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Old 11-14-2005, 11:00 PM   #1
jandjbtx
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Registered: Nov 2005
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Uninstall Debian Sarge


I recently installed a downloaded version of Debian Sarge without having done enough research, and now I have a mess. I think my best bet is to start over. Can someone tell me how to uninstall Debian Sarge?
Thanks
 
Old 11-14-2005, 11:59 PM   #2
purelithium
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Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Canada
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depends, do you want to go back to windows or do you want to re-install?

If you want to get rid of linux, just boot from your Windows setup disc and re-install, when it asks where to put the OS, make sure you delete all the linux partitions before you start.

It's basically the same idea if you want to re-install a linux distro, just boot to the install disc and just re-partition the drive when prompted.

It's quite easy, if you want to keep your X settings, you can just tell the installer to not format your partition that had your /home directory on it. Saves a lot of trouble when installing linux, I find. This makes cleaning up messes easy.
 
Old 11-15-2005, 07:12 AM   #3
stealth_banana
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Registered: Mar 2004
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Do you have any data you want to keep?

If so, back all of it up first (hint always put /home) on a separate partition.

Then just boot from the debian disc and do a fresh install. I am assuming you have now worked out what you want to do. Don't worry, it took me at least 3 test installs until I was happy, and I bet most people here as well. In fact even after having debian on this box for over 3 years I am still thinking of changing how my discs are partitioned.

If you are new to linux, to be honest, I would try one of the 'easier' distros first, the ones that hold your hand in the installation and setup.
 
Old 11-15-2005, 07:51 AM   #4
ethics
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Registered: Apr 2005
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depending on how far you got into configuring your system, backing up/storing home on a seperate partition is a good idea, if you haven't made any changes (/home normally contains user specific configs and your personal files) i wouldn't bother, it's just wasted time.

Once you have resolved that you can work on resinstalling/removing.

If you want to start Debian again, just go through the same installation route, formatting the same partitions again (different layout if you want)

to remove debian for good boot to a windows cd, go into rescue mode, fix the mbr to remove grub, then from windows or something else remove/format the partitions linux is on,and it's all gone.

If you have a particular problem as to why the current system got in a mess, people here can help.

I recently installed debian with a graphical desktop, discovered that doing it that way means everything is tied into gnome and gnome is tied into everything, ie trying to remove games would try and remove the desktop environment, not fun.

Next i installed a minimum system (text mode, with file sharing server (SSH etc) and i am using apt-get to install what i need piece by piece, time consuming but worth it i feel. Also gives you a good insight int o what packages can do what
 
Old 11-15-2005, 02:07 PM   #5
halvy
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sounds like when you 'upgraded' you may have used a different respository than the one your system started with ..

ie, if you have a 'stable' system, and tried using 'unstable' or even 'testing' as your respository for upgrading/updateing (i'm talking about the whole os, not just one program), then that may have been the cause of your problem.

i've heard people say it is 'ok' to do that.. and maybe you could (get away with it sometimes), but to me, it is NOT worth it, when you could just 'upgrade' from the proper respository when you want to...and always have a good solid system to work with.

this way you can ALWAYS upgrade any of your personal favorite applications from ANY of the repositories, this way you can find out which one is best suited for you system, without trashing your 'whole' os.

good luck :)
 
Old 11-15-2005, 07:44 PM   #6
jandjbtx
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Registered: Nov 2005
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Still confused

At this point I would be happy if I could get Win 98 reinstalled, then worry about Linux when I learn more about it. The reinstall goes fine until I get to the question of partition. I am referred to FDISK, and am able to complete the first few steps, but I hang up on the "Delete DOS Partition or Logical DOS Drive" step; I can't get past that. Also, the Linux system, if I try to use it, gets to the password, but then refuses to accept the proper password. If anyone has a drastic suggestion, I will try it.

Thanks
 
Old 11-16-2005, 12:43 AM   #7
halvy
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if you have only one drive then just go ahead put 98 back on (ooooh, that hurt saying thahttt!!) ;)

i believe the 98 disk has fdisk and format on it somewhere.. so just look for them and use them if the install craps out when it sees linux.

if you were using debian to install, you probably ran into cfdisk, which is actually quite a good partitioner... if you follow it's instructions, you will get what you want occomplished.

my suggestion then is to build a debian from scratch, on a seperate drive, so you don't have to worry about partitioning (until you learn and get comfortable with it).

debian is one of the most stable and supported distros out there.. many, many people (and companies) use it, and build custom distros from it. it has over 20k programs written for it!!

i say build it from scratch, because you will get a stable system that is to 'your liking' at that point. then all you need to do is to 'harden it' and keep it backed up properly, and you'll be all good to go!!

surely you can afford an old 20-100gig drive from a mom & pop computer store in your area to do this when you are ready.

good luck, and just relax, linux will be waiting for you :)
 
Old 11-16-2005, 03:51 PM   #8
jandjbtx
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Registered: Nov 2005
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OK, I invested in a 40GB hard drive, which I will probably mess up when I install it, but I want to get one more answer. The Debian OS will take me to the "login" prompt. When I enter the login name (at least I think that's what I am entering - the instructions were not clear to me), a "password" prompt comes up. When I attempt to enter the password which I assigned during installation, nothing happens. Regardless of what I type, nothing enters. What am I doing wrong?

Thanks
 
Old 11-16-2005, 05:37 PM   #9
ethics
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you should have created both a root account and a normal user account during the installation, make sure you are not confusing the 2 user/pass'
 
Old 11-16-2005, 06:04 PM   #10
halvy
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if you haven't reinstalled yet, add a user now (if you can).

at the command prompt (get to one by ctrl alt f1 or f2, etc (except f7, it is your graphical terminal) if you need to, but it sounds like you don't have a graphical screen yet created.

then add a user by typing: adduser

then a space

then a name (other than root).

then hit enter.

from here on out you can use the command: su

when you need to do certain admin (root) functions.

but it sounds like you corrupted your root by not giving it a password during your last install, like ethics said... so a fresh install will be the easiest/fastest way at this point to recover.

(dont' worry, we all learned this way), and be sure to create a 'root' password when the install programs asks for one AND add a user name that you would like to have (the installer should ask for that as well).

these two are essential in most linux distros because of the way security and certain programs require it.

hang in there.. when you are done building your linux box, you will be very knowledgable in it, as well as be VERY glad you took the time and patience to do it

ahhnd finally use that 98 disk what it was always meant for, ----- a coaster ;)

Last edited by halvy; 11-16-2005 at 06:08 PM.
 
  


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