LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - Newbie (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/)
-   -   Unable to log in after KDE fresh install. Arch Noob (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/unable-to-log-in-after-kde-fresh-install-arch-noob-924358/)

KevinZ 01-18-2012 12:20 AM

Unable to log in after KDE fresh install. Arch Noob
 
I've been following the Wiki for the past couple hours , and i'm on about my third install (i've had to work out a few kinks and figure a bit out). I've gotten X installed and was running fine with that. I've gotten the whole KDE package installed along with a new user named 'kevin'. I've checked my permissions on that account and everything looks fine , but when I try to log in on the KDE screen it won't let me...It still says "myhost" on the box , but I know i'm not supposed to make it so I can log in as root either.

I can log in to the root on the command line as well as my account I created using add user command and following the steps. I do have sudo powers (I think It said I did) and I have wheel access (if thats the correct term.)

i'm apparently typing in the wrong information...can someone point me in the right direction to edit my KDE files? I've been messing around with this for about an hour and a half....

xylos 01-18-2012 12:29 AM

What is being reported in /var/log/secure?

KevinZ 01-18-2012 12:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xylos (Post 4577548)
What is being reported in /var/log/secure?

I honestly didn't know this existed. I'm currently on a windows machine looking for fixes for this problem , so I can't try that for the time being.

This:http://forum.kde.org/viewtopic.php?f=66&t=97029 sounds like the same problem I'm having , but they haven't found a fix....

xylos 01-18-2012 12:40 AM

Hmm... I'll try to build up an Arch VM tomorrow to check this out... headed to bed at the moment. I'd agree with the comments in the thread you posted though; it sounds like there's something misconfigured there. A few other things to try:

1. Fire off a startx from the terminal with the following command: "startx > /tmp/xlogfile 2>&1" Then review the /tmp/xlogfile contents after it fails to see if you captured any more useful information.
2. Check /etc/securetty and TEMPORARILY allow root to login anywhere, then see if the problem occurs for both regular users and root or only for regular users. If it's the latter case, it's time to check file permissions.
3. As a hail mary attempt, you could always try creating an account without wheel/sudo access and see if it's a problem with the configuration rejecting anyone with root access in any way (very unlikely)

KevinZ 01-18-2012 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xylos (Post 4577555)
Hmm... I'll try to build up an Arch VM tomorrow to check this out... headed to bed at the moment. I'd agree with the comments in the thread you posted though; it sounds like there's something misconfigured there. A few other things to try:

1. Fire off a startx from the terminal with the following command: "startx > /tmp/xlogfile 2>&1" Then review the /tmp/xlogfile contents after it fails to see if you captured any more useful information.
2. Check /etc/securetty and TEMPORARILY allow root to login anywhere, then see if the problem occurs for both regular users and root or only for regular users. If it's the latter case, it's time to check file permissions.
3. As a hail mary attempt, you could always try creating an account without wheel/sudo access and see if it's a problem with the configuration rejecting anyone with root access in any way (very unlikely)

I'll try the first two probably since I'm not too sure on adding and deleting past users since that is done through vi ( I think ). I tried startx or something like that earlier , but the first time I ran it it wasn't working , and then the second time it brought up the GUI with three windows.

To check /etc/security I would type nano /etc/security into the CI right? I'm still a tad shaky on finding things so far...

xylos 01-18-2012 12:56 AM

To add a user:

# useradd USERNAME
# passwd USERNAME

And then enter a password. Don't do anything else and they won't have root access. :)

To view a file, you can use nano as you indicated, or you can use my personal favorite:

# less /etc/securetty

Then you can scroll up and down (up arrow/down arrow), page up and down (with PgUp/PgDown), and not have to worry about accidentally changing anything.

As a note, it's /etc/securetty (NOT /etc/security/, which is a directory). /etc/securetty defines where the root account is allowed to login; for any terminals not listed there root login is denied (aside from SSH, which handles things its own way).

KevinZ 01-18-2012 01:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xylos (Post 4577566)
To add a user:

# useradd USERNAME
# passwd USERNAME

And then enter a password. Don't do anything else and they won't have root access. :)

To view a file, you can use nano as you indicated, or you can use my personal favorite:

# less /etc/securetty

Then you can scroll up and down (up arrow/down arrow), page up and down (with PgUp/PgDown), and not have to worry about accidentally changing anything.

As a note, it's /etc/securetty (NOT /etc/security/, which is a directory). /etc/securetty defines where the root account is allowed to login; for any terminals not listed there root login is denied (aside from SSH, which handles things its own way).

Ah yes :P

Must I download anything to use the # less /etc/securetty ? Sorry I thought it was a spelling error haha

excuse the ignorant questions I decided to dive into Arch head first :o so tomorrow I should try that stuff? I was also told to try cat /etc/rc.conf..... I'm pretty tired so I'll re-read this tomorrow at the very least.

KevinZ 01-18-2012 12:22 PM

Here is my rc.conf file....

http://pastebin.com/JXYvmXp9

KevinZ 01-18-2012 03:32 PM

I've gotten dbus to start up automatically but KDE still won't let me login...


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:57 AM.