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Old 06-23-2014, 03:05 PM   #16
273
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NGIB View Post
My opinion about root access - it's my computer and I should have access to it. I understand the need for security on a multiuser system; however, for my personal computer it's whatever works simply and sudo works...
I'm of a similar opinion but I prefer "su -". Sudo is OK but you've reminded me to sort out the passwordless sudo on my pi as I think that's a step too far.
 
Old 06-23-2014, 05:01 PM   #17
Shadow_7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
...
If you have broadcom wireless and are relying on that to work during install, you're out of luck however as I don't know of any distributions which redistribute their firmware.
I tend to do the debootstrap method of installing debian. One advantage is that you basically install debian in a chroot environment with an already running linux with the firewall and networking needs already done. Which allows you to get the networking up to par on the chroot install before you actually boot it. And other perks like putting a non-pae kernel on it and slapping it on a USB storage device destined for a different machine.
 
Old 06-24-2014, 01:36 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdkaye View Post
I was under the impression that /etc/sudoers came with the sudoers package. Am I mistaken?
Since sudo is a common tool, I imagine it is included in every distribution. (I have not checked the guts of every distro to see what is and is not installed, so there may be distros without it.) Systems like Debian do not have sudo enabled. It must be enabled and configured by those who need it.

Last edited by Randicus Draco Albus; 06-24-2014 at 01:40 AM.
 
Old 06-24-2014, 01:47 AM   #19
evo2
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdkaye View Post
I was under the impression that /etc/sudoers came with the sudoers package. Am I mistaken?
You are correct. The default config gives full root permissions to members of the sudo group via the following line in /etc/sudoers
Code:
%sudo   ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL
(from sudo 1.8.5p2-1 in wheezy).

Evo2.
 
Old 06-24-2014, 01:50 AM   #20
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
Systems like Debian do not have sudo enabled. It must be enabled and configured by those who need it.
what do you mean by "enabled"? Installed? Configured in a manner you don't like?

Evo2.
 
Old 06-24-2014, 02:42 AM   #21
jdkaye
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evo2 View Post
Hi,

what do you mean by "enabled"? Installed? Configured in a manner you don't like?

Evo2.
Yes, that was part of my puzzlement as well. I have been using Debian for a rather long time and I don't recall any versions that didn't come with the sudo package already installed. That package does include a sudoers file. I still have no idea of what an "ignorant abuse of sudo" is. Is it any different from an "ignorant abuse" of su. And is there such a thing as "an intelligent abuse"? Or is the the "ignorant" inserted for dramatic effect?

Oh, and congratulations on attaining guru-hood.
jdk
 
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Old 06-24-2014, 08:09 AM   #22
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Installed by default in debian, sure. Enabled for users in the sudo group, sure. But users are not in the sudo group by default, and some folks prefer that. Normally if I need root permissions, I'm going to be doing more than one command. As in "apt-get update" and "apt-get dist-upgrade". So prefixing a sequence of commands with sudo in front of every command is wasted keystrokes for me. When I could just su to root.

I can see where sudo might be preferred for a company where full trust isn't given to all employees. But for my home desktop(s) where I'm basically the ONLY (known) user, it's wasted effort. And wasted drive space if I never use it. And a potential security hole if misconfigured. And... And... And... As I look at the raspbian defaults and cringe a little more everyday. That passwordless sudo, those rpc and nfs modules not as modules, that dated debian squeeze aroma. And I guess the arch image also has rpc and nfs non-modules. That wasted ram on a low ram piece of hardware. Probably just a personal preference, but geez louise.
 
Old 06-24-2014, 08:28 AM   #23
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It's all a matter of taste and preference. I enable sudo, because I'm sometimes forgetful. I run the risk of logging in as root and forgetting that I did, leaving my computer in root. I don't like to do that, so I mostly use sudo, which is set to time out in 5 minutes if I forget about it. If I'm going to do an update, I don't want to even type in the update and dist-upgrade separately, so I have an alias set to do both, using sudo. It's my computer, and if I want to use sudo, then by god I'll use sudo. If you or others want to rant about it, rant on. The Debian wiki plainly says that sudo is the preferred way, and I prefer it, so that's what I use. I do use su for some things, and have no issues with using it when needed, nor with anyone else using it exclusively. I just resent the snobs who think they know what's best for everyone in the world, when clearly they don't.
 
Old 06-25-2014, 08:55 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
{SNIP} If you have broadcom wireless and are relying on that to work during install, you're out of luck however as I don't know of any distributions which redistribute their firmware.
yikes I ran into this last night -- friend using an HP laptop w/ Win7. object: convert to MINT/LMDE

Win7 reports Broadcom network running 802.11g ( installed by his service provider )

Q: if I use an RJ45 connection during the install might the installed system then support the Broadcom network chipset?
 
Old 06-25-2014, 09:43 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike acker View Post
Q: if I use an RJ45 connection during the install might the installed system then support the Broadcom network chipset?
Only if you install the driver(s) for the chipset. Which will likely require proprietary firmware. And depending on the age of the device it may not be the default firmware that is accessible from a distros defaults. It's enough of a hassle that I use a standalone router to handle my wireless needs. In most cases it is possible to make the device work in linux. But YMMV and you might find that something like ndiswrapper works better than something like b43. Or vice versa.

In my case I use an asus rt-n12 which gives me a wireless method over ethernet for the client machines. In repeater mode for the asus firmware, and with client_bridge using ddwrt. With a side affect of having the capabilities of being the wifi access point for up to 4 wired devices. Which is a pretty good deal for a $40 device.
 
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Old 06-25-2014, 12:31 PM   #26
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super helpers!!

super helpers, thanks all So Much!!


this is a client machine -- HP laptop. I have a Netgear wireless dongle in my parts drawer; there's a chance that might do the trick. If not I'll hunt down a wireless dongle at NewEgg or Office Depot.

the machine is "for evaluation". it is an older box and my friend just "wants to get his feet wet".

most likely we'll have another Linux user

Q: would installing the Canonical based MINT possible work -- I'm using the DEBIAN base right now.... ?
 
Old 06-25-2014, 12:46 PM   #27
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Debian is great. I switched to it after having used Ubuntu 10.04 as my first Linux distro, and there was really nothing hard about it (contrary to what I had been expecting). Debian worked out of the box for me (Just be sure to enable the non-free repositories).
 
Old 06-25-2014, 02:30 PM   #28
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Used to be hard to install and configure but now Debian is really user-friendly
 
  


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