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-   -   Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora or OpenSuse (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/ubuntu-linux-mint-fedora-or-opensuse-948066/)

ceantuco 06-01-2012 07:33 PM

Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora or OpenSuse
 
Hi Guys,

Ive been using Ubuntu since version 8.04 but I don't like version 11 and 12. I have version 12.04 LTS currently installed on my laptop. i3 processor, 4GB or ram, etc etc. Ubuntu runs slow sometimes. Also, Ive gotten a few Crash Reports (reminds me of M$crosoft). Which Distro would you guys recommend? I need something like Ubuntu 10. Keyboard friendly with all shortcuts (alt+tab, altf4,f2,f1, etc)
Thank you

TroN-0074 06-01-2012 09:01 PM

actually since you are already familiar with a Linux distribution you should try to move up on more stable distributions such as Debian or SlackWare.
In my opinion if you install Linux Mint, OpenSuSE or Fedora you wont be moving too far from Ubuntu in the sense that all these are put together with a corporate environment in mind.
Slackware and Debian will give you the freedom to install the software you want in your computer.
Good luck to you.

CincinnatiKid 06-01-2012 09:25 PM

Why not give Mageia a try? I would not try Mint, I tried it and many basic features were not available, like creating a desktop shortcut to a program. I am not kidding, I have 10 years of Linux experience with gobs of distros including Slackware, LFS, Gentoo. I posted on LQ and no one could figure out how to create a desktop shortcut. It is like it was so oversimplified not even a caveman can figure out how to use it.

theKbStockpiler 06-01-2012 10:04 PM

In my opinion Fedora is a Moderate Distro and Suse tries to overcome Linux Shortfalls but it makes it bloated. Suse is definitely different and for that reason is worth trying out to get your own perspective of it. If you like what I think is a Linux answer to Windows ,try the Mandrake forks of Mandriva/Mageia. Mandriva 2008 was awesome ,Mandriva 2010 was the most appealing interface I have ever used and I have a solid install of Mageia 1 currently.

John VV 06-01-2012 11:26 PM

unless you build it from the ground up
think Gentoo or Slack
Arch is good IF you WANT to use a prebuilt and install ONLY what you want
it has it's good and bad points

Fedora ??? well fedora is , well "fedora" what can one say .

OpenSUSE ?? good points - it just works Except for Gnome3 gnome 3 is well a P.O.S. ( a #2 and smells like it also)

Bloated yes, but some things can be removed though not much .


put it this way my mom that has a hard time with yahoo mail is using opensuse 11.4 ( i will be upgrading her this summer)

OpenSUSE is a rpm based distro and NOT a .deb system
suse uses "zypper" and NOT yum , though yum can be installed

grail 06-02-2012 03:46 AM

I am not sure of the others but would also warn you off Linux Mint as I have used it for a number of months now and had repeated crashes that I have been unable to solve.

Another option to Slackware if too heavy for you is to try Salix which comes with its own front end installer which seems not bad.

pixellany 06-02-2012 05:55 AM

For many users, I think the "best" distro is often the last one they try. I think there are too many variables for anyone to advise someone else on what is "best".

Since joining LQ, I've probably done about 100 Linux installs, and most of them have had some kind of major or minor annoyance. Most recently, I am **really** turned off by some of the fluff that people are inventing for the GUI (gnome-shell, for starters).

I used to suggest that anything in the "top ten" at distrowatch would be a safe bet, but there's Arch in 7th place--and that is NOT a distro for an inexperienced user.

So---my answer to the original question is "try it"

TroN-0074 06-02-2012 08:00 AM

I have to point out two things here.

1) I dont think OP is inexperienced since he pointed out in post #1 he has been using Ubuntu since 8.04, so I am assuming he could handle the command line on any other distro, Debian and Slackware being the most reliable for stability I suggested them.

2) I see some of the suggestions are being based on graphical interface. Keep in mind that in Linux there are different graphical environment and you can easily change it without having to change distro at all. KDE, Xfce, LXDE and lot more still let you put icons on the desktop.

Perhaps Package manager is a better subject when considering trying a different distro .deb, or rpm,. apt or yum, YaST or Synaptic

Good luck to you!

DavidMcCann 06-02-2012 10:45 AM

It all depends on why you used to like Ubuntu and why you don't like it now. Since you stopped liking it with version 11, perhaps it was the change from Gnome to Unity that was the last straw? If so, try Linux Mint Maté version:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/review...p/product/2188
It's certainly faster, but there is the current encryption problem (unless I was just unlucky there).

Another possibility is Solus:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/review...page/15/sort/7

kareempharmacist 06-02-2012 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TroN-0074 (Post 4693517)
actually since you are already familiar with a Linux distribution you should try to move up on more stable distributions such as Debian or SlackWare.
In my opinion if you install Linux Mint, OpenSuSE or Fedora you wont be moving too far from Ubuntu in the sense that all these are put together with a corporate environment in mind.
Slackware and Debian will give you the freedom to install the software you want in your computer.
Good luck to you.

I agree with you..

kareempharmacist 06-02-2012 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TroN-0074 (Post 4693797)
I have to point out two things here.

1) I dont think OP is inexperience since he pointed out in post #1 he has been using Ubuntu since 8.04, so I am assuming he could handle the command line on any other distro, Debian and Slackware being the most reliable for stability I suggested them.

2) I see some of the suggestions are being based on graphical interface. Keep in mind that in Linux there are different graphical environment and you can easily change it without having to change distro at all. KDE, Xfce, LXDE and lot more still let you put icons on the desktop.

Perhaps Package manager is a better subject when considering trying a different distro .deb, or rpm,. apt or yum, YaST or Synaptic

Good luck to you!

wise answer from wise user

alabamaman 06-02-2012 11:44 PM

I asked this same question when I first started using Linux years ago. Instead of installing one distro after another and seeing what I liked/didn't like, I just decided to partition out my drive and make a multi-boot machine. It's not really too complicated, and there is plenty of good documentation on how to do it without a giant headache. I personally like Fedora, because it tends to be the least PITA, but that's just my opinion. It's all about finding your flavor.

ceantuco 06-03-2012 11:05 AM

Hi Guys, thank you very much for your responses. I tried Linux mint and yes, there was a few things I couldn't do or modify. Like I said I am a keyboard guy, I barely use the mouse and having to use the mouse in Gnome3 is just driving me nuts. I will give Debian a shot. I also noticed that Debian is widely used in corporations and most Linux Admin jobs require knowledge in Debian so I think Debian will be a much better distro for me to try. Do I have to download all 7 Debian DVD ISOs to be able to install it? Thanks

DavidMcCann 06-03-2012 12:01 PM

No, the full set of DVDs are for people who want their own repository because they can't get broadband (or even any internet). You can install with the first disk.

ceantuco 06-03-2012 12:11 PM

Thank you! Im downloading the first disk now.


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