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Old 07-24-2006, 07:07 AM   #1
combatseabee
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Two Physical Hard Drives FC5


I have two hard drives /dev/hda and /dev/hdb. I'm using Disk Druid to install FC5 and want to install FC5 in the most stable and secure manner.

I am having trouble with this because I'm not sure which partitions to keep on hda and which to put on hdb. The books that I am using have very little information on this.

Some say putting root on a separate partition is good practice, but could cause some problems if the root partition should become full. So, how big should the root partition be? It says to create a seperate /var partition but again how big should this partition be also?

How would you separate your partitions on your hard disks if you had two and which would you consider to be more secure?

 
Old 07-24-2006, 07:48 AM   #2
konsolebox
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perhaps you can tell us the size of each hd you have and at least their rpm.
 
Old 07-24-2006, 07:56 AM   #3
MasterC
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Welcome to LQ

I don't think anyone can answer that question for you; it's personal preference. Your book is making suggestions, which is all you'll get here. In the end, it's completely up to you.

In the past here's what I've done:

I put /var /home and /usr on seperate partitions. Makes backing up easier for me in my situations.

It really depends on what you'll be doing with your machine on how you want to partition and where you want your partitions to be mounted. Typically:

On servers, you'll get logs filling up fast that you probably don't want to throw away immediately. Hence the recommendation for a seperate /var partition. This recommendation is 2 fold:
1) It allows you to dedicate an entire partition to logging and database. Both grow rapidly, and both are important to the survival of your services you are serving out (typically).
2) When these get close to full, your system will still survive a reboot without forcing you to clear up free space from your / partition.

The /home should be relatively obvious, but I place it on a seperate partition to make it easy to recover 'users' personal files and personal configurations.

/usr is on it's own because it is where I place nearly all of my applications. Again, easy for routine backup. /usr gets backed up before and after any software install/update.

However, on most of my desktops and my dedicated machines (for things like MythTV) I use a single partition for all of Linux's filesystem structure, and 1 mega-partition for the recordings (in the example of MythTV) and such; which is not part of a typical filesystem (/mnt/store for me).

How much to dedicate to each partition and on which drive to put the data is really up to you. If you are running a server that will be extremely Apache/MySQL/PHP intensive and needs a lot of I/O, you may be better off dedicating /dev/hdb for your /var partition and throw everything else on /dev/hda (assuming you are going to have something like /var/db or /var/cache/db or /var/anything be your database directory/ies).

Cool
 
Old 07-24-2006, 01:28 PM   #4
combatseabee
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Not using this as any type of server other than just to learn and experiment with. I want to use my linux box as my firewall and have any other home PC's behind it. I want to make it "somewhat difficult" to break into. I'm just learning so this will be fun to tinker around with. I'm using an old machine to do this with, using spare hard disks from old PCs laying around. I have to 40 gig hard drives.

I want to eventually install AIDE and SNORT and take it from there. Although I'm not new to Linux it has been a few years since I've used it. I took two courses, Introduction to UNIX and Linux Administration and that's it. So, what I know is from limited class experience and textbook references.

Any more feedback? P.S. Thank you MasterC, your thorough explanation and thoughts are well appreciated. I look forward to your reply.
 
Old 07-24-2006, 03:09 PM   #5
pixellany
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All you NEED for any install is / (root) and swap. I recommend not going beyond this without a reason (one whihc makes sense to YOU).

Here's one to consider: To facilitate backup, it is nice to have the /home directory on a separate partition and--if possible--a separate physical drive. This also reduces the odds of losing data when you do something else to your system.
Another sub-reason would be sharing data with Windows in a dual-boot setup.

A variant is simply linking key directories in /home to the real data on another drive.
 
Old 07-25-2006, 03:03 AM   #6
MasterC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by combatseabee
Not using this as any type of server other than just to learn and experiment with. I want to use my linux box as my firewall and have any other home PC's behind it. I want to make it "somewhat difficult" to break into. I'm just learning so this will be fun to tinker around with. I'm using an old machine to do this with, using spare hard disks from old PCs laying around. I have to 40 gig hard drives.
That should be plenty to tinker with. I assume you've got multiple NIC's in the box if you are planning on feeding it out to your network? My smoothwall setup (which is just a fancy old PC with a triplet of NICs in it) does this nicely; 1 ethernet in from my cable modem, another one of the NICs out to my server, and the third out to my switch which connects my internal network. If you are just wanting to build a fortress, you may want to become familiar with IPTables.
Quote:
I want to eventually install AIDE and SNORT and take it from there. Although I'm not new to Linux it has been a few years since I've used it. I took two courses, Introduction to UNIX and Linux Administration and that's it. So, what I know is from limited class experience and textbook references.
Sounds like a solid foundation to build on. I'd suggest following Pixellany's advice, start out with a simple partition scheme, 1 or at most 2 partitions. As you learn and grow, you can always stuff another HD in the box, or 'shuffle' files around and divide up your existing drives to better suite your needs; if necessary.
Quote:
Any more feedback? P.S. Thank you MasterC, your thorough explanation and thoughts are well appreciated. I look forward to your reply.
No problem, good luck and glad I could help!

(Side note, I just noticed your name. My brother and dad are both CB's. EOs specifically. I was a Corpsman, though I'm out now.)

Cool

Last edited by MasterC; 07-25-2006 at 03:04 AM.
 
Old 07-26-2006, 09:00 AM   #7
combatseabee
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Linux vs Microsoft certification

Yep I was a CB too! I was an EA. EO's Cool!

Thanks for Giving me the tip on using 3 NIC's. So how do you configure each separate NIC. Is eth0 going to your cable modem, eth1 to your server, and eth3 to your switch?

By the way when I tried to install with the two drives connected my install failed. I had to disconnect the slave hard drive to successfully complete the install. So now how do I mount the slave? Forgive me if I'm leaving out important details, just ask me if I am.

I have another off the subject question MasterC. From one veteran to another, I am being offered VocRehab training to get certified in anything I want. I am struggling between two OS's Microsoft and Linux, MCSE or RHCE. The only reason I am struggling between the two if because of job marketability. I am working at an IS Helpdesk at a hospital because I could not find a job as a Network Adminisrator. I went to school for 3 years and have an AS in Computer Information Systems with a concentration in "Network Administration". I am CompTIA Network+ Certified.

My heart lies with Linux, I love command-line and open source. I have to give my Voc Rehab counselor a good argument as to why I am choosing RHCE over MCSE. I live in Mass (at the very heart of the Open Document Format excitement) CIO Quinn? Know about it? Anyway can you give me any good supporting arguments that I can relay to my Voc Rehab counselor other than the obvious reasons as to why I believe I would have more of an edge with RHCE over MCSE?

Maybe I should start a new thread? I will post this as a new thread as well to get any other input.

CB!
 
Old 07-27-2006, 11:20 AM   #8
MasterC
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Yes, I pretty much have it setup like that. 1 coming in from Cable modem, one going out to server, other going out to Switch; works quite nicely and is a standard setup option for use with Smoothwall (as a firewall only box). They call it a Green/Red/Orange network.

Configuring it myself would have probably a lot more work than I actually put into it since Smoothwall configures it all for you, to a point anyway. I just had to supply the info (IP, etc) and the rest was basically just a scripted install.

That's odd the install failed, maybe it couldn't format over the existing data on the second drive for some reason. To get the second drive up and working with your system now, you'll want to do something similar to following:
(c)fdisk to create the partitions, I prefer fdisk over cfdisk, it just seems more straight forward. Then, create a filesystem on the paritition(s) on that second disk, and if necessary, copy over the existing data, and finally choose a mount point. The following are the commands I'd use if my second hard drive was on the second IDE controller and jumpered as master (/dev/hdc):
fdisk /dev/hdc
n
p
1
ENTER/ENTER
w
What those commands will do is start fdisk on /dev/hdc, create an new partition, primary, the first partition, use the entire disk, and finally write the changes to disk. For more info on using fdisk, after you fire it up, hit 'm'.
Next, a filesystem, for simplicity we'll use ext3:
mke2fs -j /dev/hdc1
This will create a filesystem on the first partition of the hard drive (which in the above example ends up being the only partition from this hard drive).
Next, mount it somewhere different to copy the data from the existing directory to the new hard drive that will eventually live at the old directories home, I'll assume /home for this example:
mkdir /mnt/newdisk
mount -t ext3 /dev/hdc1 /mnt/newdisk
cp -a /home/* /mnt/newdisk/
rm -rf /home/* &&
mount -t ext3 /dev/hdc1 /home
Please note, this step will remove all the data on home. You might want to test the /mnt/newdisk data to make sure nothing accidently went missing during the cp command (though I've personally never had it happen to me). If all the data seems to be there, go ahead and delete the existing data in /home and then mount up with the remaining commands. Remember to create the new entry in /etc/fstab, something like:
Code:
/dev/hdc1    /home    ext3    defaults   0  0
Usually I'll reboot after this to make sure that on subsequent reboots, everything is as I expect it to be (/home is mounted on /dev/hdc1, etc).

For all of the above, you'll need to change the device for your actual device (Primary controller, jumpered slave is hdb, and so on) as well as whatever directory(ies) you actually want mounted on the new partition(s).

HTH

OT:
They are pretty strict with the VocRehab stuff eh? Part of my disability made it so they won't pay for me to go through Pharmacy school, so I am using GI Bill instead. Though, I am rapidly changing my mind, that is another story...

One of the best arguments I've given to people for wanting to get Linux certs versus Microsoft certs is the field I am interested in. Networking folks seem to be more Linux/Cisco than MSFT, also a better argument I used at one point was that I found a handful of job descriptions for basically just tech support where they required MCSE, yet every RCHE/Cisco/Linux + requirement was alongside a job that was a career type IT job.

Good Luck!

Cool
 
Old 07-27-2006, 05:13 PM   #9
combatseabee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterC
They are pretty strict with the VocRehab stuff eh? Part of my disability made it so they won't pay for me to go through Pharmacy school, so I am using GI Bill instead. Though, I am rapidly changing my mind, that is another story...
Yeah I hear you there! Because I had already used my GI Bill (a benefit I paid for), they cut my Voc Rehab down to one year. I actually wanted to go back to school and get my Bachelors in Computer Engineering. Oh well, at least I'm getting something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterC
One of the best arguments I've given to people for wanting to get Linux certs versus Microsoft certs is the field I am interested in. Networking folks seem to be more Linux/Cisco than MSFT, also a better argument I used at one point was that I found a handful of job descriptions for basically just tech support where they required MCSE, yet every RCHE/Cisco/Linux + requirement was alongside a job that was a career type IT job.
You are so right about "career type" IT jobs, only I can't seem to get experience because no one want's to hire me to get experience. Go figure?!! I got a reply from "hob" under the General forum and he seems to have a good argument. BTW I am also a woman so I do have to compete with stereotypical roles here in Mass. They are so behind the times here with allowing women get into technical careers (especially Networking!)

Thank you again for your detailed explanation on how to set things up on my Linux box. I can't thank you enough. I'm sure will be needing more of your expertise for advice as I dig myself into a never ending project(something I love to do!).

 
  


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