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Old 08-22-2006, 11:55 PM   #1
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Two operating systems on one hard drive.


How could I install another operating system on my hard drive, so when I boot up, I can choose which linux system to run?

I currently have Ubuntu 6.06, and I want to put on Linux From Scratch 6.0.

How could I do that?
 
Old 08-23-2006, 12:10 AM   #2
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Hi User Name
albeit far from my concern, but, can I just ask why it would be that you want to run two distro's off your 'puta?

Hypcocracy at the highest level, i know, I run FC5 and Mandriva along side XP, but thats only coz I cant decide which one I REALLY want to use as a replacement yet!
 
Old 08-23-2006, 12:20 AM   #3
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Some of us run 5 or more---one resident here has a famous thread on how to have more than 100: http://www.justlinux.com/forum/showt...hreadid=143973

To answer the question: Most installers will detect other OSes and automatically set up the bootloader. Basically, the first step is to create space on your drive. (Not all installers will let you resize existing partitions) Use GParted ( a standalone bootable CD), QtParted (comes with Knoppix), ar any other common partitioning tool.

Once you have empty space (at least 3Gb), then simply proceed with installing the 2nd distro. If it does not detect your other system, then you will need to go into the bootloader config menu to make an entry. In your case, you already have a bootloader with Ubuntu. When you install the new system, tell it NOT to install the bootloader. Then, go into the Ubuntu config file and make an entry for the new install.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 12:22 AM   #4
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PS: Search here on "dual-boot". It is one of the most common topics.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 12:30 AM   #5
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Quote:
Some of us run 5 or more---one resident here has a famous thread on how to have more than 100:
Thanks for putting me in my spot, pixellany.
I think I shall just stick to 2 or 3 OS's. I had enough trouble getting the three of them that I already have to happyily co-exist with each other!
 
Old 08-23-2006, 12:41 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Some of us run 5 or more---one resident here has a famous thread on how to have more than 100: http://www.justlinux.com/forum/showt...hreadid=143973

To answer the question: Most installers will detect other OSes and automatically set up the bootloader. Basically, the first step is to create space on your drive. (Not all installers will let you resize existing partitions) Use GParted ( a standalone bootable CD), QtParted (comes with Knoppix), ar any other common partitioning tool.

Once you have empty space (at least 3Gb), then simply proceed with installing the 2nd distro. If it does not detect your other system, then you will need to go into the bootloader config menu to make an entry. In your case, you already have a bootloader with Ubuntu. When you install the new system, tell it NOT to install the bootloader. Then, go into the Ubuntu config file and make an entry for the new install.
If during the instalation, you have to use disk partioning programs, such as fdisk, or cfdisk, would you need Gparted, or QtParted?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DJNolz83
Hi User Name
albeit far from my concern, but, can I just ask why it would be that you want to run two distro's off your 'puta?

Hypcocracy at the highest level, i know, I run FC5 and Mandriva along side XP, but thats only coz I cant decide which one I REALLY want to use as a replacement yet!
Becuase I want to use Linux From Scratch, but I don't want to use Ubuntu too. And buying/making another computer costs alot.

Sorry about making a thread that already existed.

Last edited by User Name.; 08-23-2006 at 12:42 AM.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 09:17 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by User Name.
If during the instalation, you have to use disk partioning programs, such as fdisk, or cfdisk, would you need Gparted, or QtParted?
The partitioning tool built in to the installer is typically all you need---unless you need to re-size an existing partition to create empty space. Then you need QTparted, Gparted, Partition magic. etc.

What is you current configuration?--drives, partitions, etc.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 10:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
The partitioning tool built in to the installer is typically all you need---unless you need to re-size an existing partition to create empty space. Then you need QTparted, Gparted, Partition magic. etc.

What is you current configuration?--drives, partitions, etc.
I don't know. I don't remember from ubunu's install.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 03:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by User Name.
I don't know. I don't remember from ubunu's install.
As root (or using sudo) do "fdisk -l", and post the results. The idea is to see if you already have empty space on your disk.
 
Old 08-23-2006, 07:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
As root (or using sudo) do "fdisk -l", and post the results. The idea is to see if you already have empty space on your disk.
Code:
Disk /dev/sda: 120.0 GB, 120034123776 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14593 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1       14219   114214086   83  Linux
/dev/sda2           14220       14593     3004155    5  Extended
/dev/sda5           14220       14593     3004123+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
That help?
 
Old 08-24-2006, 12:56 AM   #11
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OK---there is no empty space. You will need one of the more capable partitioning tools to resize the existing partition. Be sure to back up any important data first.

One thing to consider: It may be just as easy to start over---install one of the Linux systems, giving it maybe 10-15 GB (+ 1GB swap) Leave the rest of the drive empty.

Then install the other OS--also in a 10-15 GB partition (swap can be shared) The installer SHOULD automatically detect the 1st OS and set up the bootloader. Once everything is working, then make a data partition to share data between the two systems.
 
Old 08-24-2006, 09:23 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
OK---there is no empty space. You will need one of the more capable partitioning tools to resize the existing partition. Be sure to back up any important data first.
I am backing up my data, and I found this guide.

But, I don't know what they mean by root directory. Ubuntu doesn't have root, yet, it uses sudo. Where would the root directory be located?
 
Old 08-24-2006, 09:37 AM   #13
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Quote:
But, I don't know what they mean by root directory. Ubuntu doesn't have root, yet, it uses sudo. Where would the root directory be located?
This is one of the most confusing points about linux. The root user is the superuser and you can temporarily become that user by using the su or sudo commands. The root directory is the / directory on your file system. The superuser (root)'s home folder is /root and usually all the other users are in /home/[username]
 
Old 08-24-2006, 12:44 PM   #14
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by User Name.
I am backing up my data, and I found this guide.

But, I don't know what they mean by root directory. Ubuntu doesn't have root, yet, it uses sudo. Where would the root directory be located?
Ubuntu DOES have root (as in root user). To enable it:

sudo passwd root
enter your user password
at the prompt, enter the new root password

Absolutely the ONLY flaw in Ubuntu--diabling the root user by default.....
 
  


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