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Old 11-02-2012, 08:54 AM   #1
Aunnix
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Trying to setup backup solution on server... having troubles with file systems


Hey Everyone,

I'm currently trying to build a home server. It has 3 hard drives... a 60GB for the OS/pkgs; 2TB "A" for data storage (media, docs, web design(s), etc.); 2TB "B" to copy data from 2TB "A" to act as a backup.

I plan to do automatic incremental data backup using something like rsync and/or cron (this is what has been suggested to me). I will save everything from my devices (laptop(s), home office desktop, phones, etc.) to the 2TB "A" hard drive and let rsync copy the data from 2TB "A" to 2TB "B".

I will be using databases for the web design and would like to make sure their information/data is backed up. The issue I have, is I'm not sure if any of these databases will reach over 4GB, so I'm trying to plan for that. So, FAT32 file system won't work due to its limitations on file size.

The idea is to use a file system that my Linux server has no problem writing to/reading (obviously so everything functions) and (if needed) I want to be able to pull the 2TB "B" drive out of the Linux server machine and put into an external case for transport (for example taking it to my girlfriend's house to watch the movies on it) and it be recognized by Windows with no problems. Any ideas or help is greatly appreciated!
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:28 PM   #2
mzamora87
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NTFS is well supported in most linux distributions, I suggest this because you have no size restriction for files, for example with FAT32 you cannot copy files that are bigger than 4GB, they will be truncated. Take a look to mount.ntfs-3g.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 01:13 PM   #3
Aunnix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mzamora87 View Post
NTFS is well supported in most linux distributions, I suggest this because you have no size restriction for files, for example with FAT32 you cannot copy files that are bigger than 4GB, they will be truncated. Take a look to mount.ntfs-3g.
That's what I've been thinking from what I'm reading online. I've installed ntfs-3g driver using:

apt-get install ntfs-3g

via command line. Everything seemed to update and install, but when I do:

mkfs.ntfs /dev/sdb OR mkfs.ntfs-3g /dev/sdb

I get a "bash error: command not known" message.

I am running Debian squeeze and doing all of this as ROOT user. For some reason, when I'm logged on as my regular user, "sudo" doesn't seem to work for me either. Again, I get the "bash error: blah" message.

I will do some Googling of "mount.ntfs-3g" and see what I can find for my flavor of Linux.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 01:25 PM   #4
mzamora87
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Install ntfsprogs (apt-get install ntfsprogs) and the use mkntfs to create filesystem. You will use mount after filesystem creation
 
Old 11-02-2012, 02:08 PM   #5
Aunnix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mzamora87 View Post
Install ntfsprogs (apt-get install ntfsprogs) and the use mkntfs to create filesystem. You will use mount after filesystem creation
That's my problem though.. I can't get past "mkntfs" because I'm told my bash file cannot recognize the command. Unless ntfsprogs is going to change that?
 
Old 11-02-2012, 03:19 PM   #6
mzamora87
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ntfsprogs is a toolset, contains several binaries, included mkntfs. When you install it you will be able to create the filesystem
 
Old 11-02-2012, 03:32 PM   #7
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I'd be tempted to only put the movie files on your ntfs partition. Keep all the important data on a linux file system. More to the point, I wouldn't use a backup device to use as a portable file storage.

Almost every modern version of linux has ntfs-3g and tools included.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 03:47 PM   #8
TobiSGD
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Windows will be more than confused to find a file-system on a drive without partitions, so create a partition first and then format it with
Code:
mkfs -t ntfs -f /dev/sdb1
After installing ntfs-progs first, of course. don't forget the -f option, otherwise the formatting application will zero out the disk and test for bad blocks first, which takes ages on a 2TB partition.

Debian is not Ubuntu. If you want to use sudo you have to configure it first.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 03:54 PM   #9
Aunnix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mzamora87 View Post
ntfsprogs is a toolset, contains several binaries, included mkntfs. When you install it you will be able to create the filesystem
Ok, cool.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 04:00 PM   #10
Aunnix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
I'd be tempted to only put the movie files on your ntfs partition. Keep all the important data on a linux file system. More to the point, I wouldn't use a backup device to use as a portable file storage.

Almost every modern version of linux has ntfs-3g and tools included.
So would you suggest just formatting all disks with ext3 or 4, and having a NTFS external drive (formatted by Windows) for portability? Will I run into issues backing up the data on the Linux machine with a Windows formatted NTFS external drive?

I've been thinking at some point to buy an external 3TB drive to use as an offline backup... Of course, this backup would be manual so I'd only backup my data to it like once a month or two months. Although, I'm already deep into my pockets on this project so I'd like to avoid an external if possible. I want the internal backup system to make sure my files are constantly being backed up when something is changed/edited or something new is added and it can be automated.

Last edited by Aunnix; 11-02-2012 at 04:06 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 04:04 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Windows will be more than confused to find a file-system on a drive without partitions, so create a partition first and then format it with
Code:
mkfs -t ntfs -f /dev/sdb1
After installing ntfs-progs first, of course. don't forget the -f option, otherwise the formatting application will zero out the disk and test for bad blocks first, which takes ages on a 2TB partition.
I have already partitioned the drive.. using cfdisk.. as one large 2TB partition. And, yeah, I zeroed out a 1.5 TB drive on my Windows 7 machine and it took like 9 hours. I'm assuming I'd be looking at like 10 or 11 hours with a 2TB. (If linux takes about the same amount of time as windows anyway...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Debian is not Ubuntu. If you want to use sudo you have to configure it first.
I wondered why this wasn't working, lol. On all of the Debian stuff I've been looking into they are using the sudo command, and I was a bit frustrated when mine wasn't working. I know I'm not supposed to stay sitting logged on as the root user, so I attempted to go the sudo route..

Last edited by Aunnix; 11-02-2012 at 04:07 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 04:12 PM   #12
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunnix View Post
I have already partitioned the drive.. using cfdisk.. as one large 2TB partition.
With your command, assuming it would have been installed, you would have tried to format the whole disk (/dev/sdb), instead the partition you have created (/dev/sdb1).

Quote:
I wondered why this wasn't working, lol. On all of the Debian stuff I've been looking into they are using the sudo command, and I was a bit frustrated when mine wasn't working. I know I'm not supposed to stay sitting logged on as the root user, so I attempted to go the sudo route..
Right, you are not supposed to be root all the time. Therefor you should normally use an unprivileged user. this is of course unless you have to do administrative work on the machine. in that case you have to be root and it is OK to be root. The difference is: With sudo you launch single commands as root, with being logged in as root (usually using the su command) you don't have to use sudo. Both are equally dangerous if sudo is configured in the "Ubuntu way" and there were already flame-wars about the use of sudo and su, so I will not bring up my personal opinion on that topic here.
If you want to use sudo have a look here: http://wiki.debian.org/sudo
 
Old 11-02-2012, 05:41 PM   #13
Aunnix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
With your command, assuming it would have been installed, you would have tried to format the whole disk (/dev/sdb), instead the partition you have created (/dev/sdb1).
Ah, I think I see what you mean. However, now that I've booted the system up, it has moved my 2TB drive to sda and it also appears to be the boot drive? The boot option is starred for this drive and not the others (ie: 60gb drive with the OS)

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
Right, you are not supposed to be root all the time. Therefor you should normally use an unprivileged user. this is of course unless you have to do administrative work on the machine. in that case you have to be root and it is OK to be root. The difference is: With sudo you launch single commands as root, with being logged in as root (usually using the su command) you don't have to use sudo. Both are equally dangerous if sudo is configured in the "Ubuntu way" and there were already flame-wars about the use of sudo and su, so I will not bring up my personal opinion on that topic here.
If you want to use sudo have a look here: http://wiki.debian.org/sudo
If they are both equally as dangerous, I will not worry about sudo. Seems a bit pointless at that point, lol.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 06:22 PM   #14
Aunnix
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I'm now seeing on my 60gb OS drive that "Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary"... I formatted it using the netinstall version of Debian Squeeze. Could I be seeing this message now because I've used fdisk on the 2TB drive and formatted them using different methods?
 
Old 11-02-2012, 06:27 PM   #15
TobiSGD
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No, this is simply not relevant, this warning is a remnant from the past of computing.
Sometimes something like the rearrangement of the disks happen, especially when adding new drives/partitions. That is the reason why many distributions (like Debian) use UUIDs the find their partitions rather then device-descriptors, which is the reason why your Debian still works.
 
  


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