LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-08-2004, 10:11 AM   #1
j-la
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Distribution: SUSE 10.0
Posts: 10

Rep: Reputation: 0
trouble unlocking a windows directory


Hi, I'm new to the linux community so I apologize in advance if my terminology is confusing and/or my question is simple yet wordy.

My summary: After a steep learning curve I currently have a dual boot system (Windows XP and Suse 9.0 - the default minimum free version) running on two physical hard drives. The first drive has 3 partitions two of which are formatted as NTFS and running Windows. /dev/hda2 is mounted as /windows/C and /dev/hda4 is mounted as /windows/F. Linux is happily running on the other drive.

My problem: When I am logged in as a regular user I can access /windows/C without problems but I am denied permission to access /windows/F. I have tried using chmod, chown, and chgrp (while logged in as root) in order to change the permissions and ownership and such but have had no success. When listing (using ls -l) the contents of the windows directory I see that C has "users" for a group name so I assume that's what is allowing me to access it. But F has "root" as the group and user name and my attempts to change either to "users" have failed.

I would like all users to be able to access the F directory, can someone please help.

Thanks for your time.
 
Old 01-08-2004, 10:14 AM   #2
keegan
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Distribution: Redhat WS and VectorLinux
Posts: 41

Rep: Reputation: 15
have you tried changing the partitions in the windows side? boot into safe mode (press F8 at bootup for a while) and look at it. make sure the necessary people have the correct access.
 
Old 01-08-2004, 11:06 AM   #3
Franklin
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2002
Distribution: Slackware, WinXP, Windows 7
Posts: 1,253

Rep: Reputation: 55
From linux, unmount /windows/F
open a terminal and su to become root
CD to /windows
enter the following command:

chmod 777 F

now exit the terminal and remount /windows/F

you should now have full read, write, and execute privilages as any user.

HTH
 
Old 01-08-2004, 11:10 AM   #4
vinay_s_s
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 658

Rep: Reputation: 30
make sure that the option umask=000 is present in ur /etc/fstab for /windows/F
 
Old 01-08-2004, 11:37 AM   #5
tgzuke
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks vinay_s_s!

I was actually having the same problem, where my windows 98 drive was uneditable and inaccessible due to what I thought was the permissions, on my new slackware system, and the umask=000 option in fstab cleared it up.

Thanks a bunch!
 
Old 01-08-2004, 01:12 PM   #6
ac1980
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Trento, Italy
Distribution: Debian testing
Posts: 394

Rep: Reputation: 30
I wouldn't go for umask=000, expecially on a ntfs partition... this means any user can completely clear the partition. Moreover, I'm not sure ntfs write support is really mature.
I would go with 022 (only root can write), or mount it ro.
Quote:
.. I see that C has "users" for a group name so I assume that's what is allowing me to access it. But F has "root" as the group and user name and my attempts to change either to "users" have failed.
edit /etc/fstab
there should be a gid=100 (or other number) in C options... copy it to the F too. Be sure not to insert spaces among options.
 
Old 01-08-2004, 05:26 PM   #7
j-la
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Distribution: SUSE 10.0
Posts: 10

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thank you for the suggestions. I got it to work (kind of) but I still have some questions. Here's what worked for me:

I inserted the following line in /etc/fstab:

/dev/hda4 /windows/F ntfs ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=iso8859-1 0 0

where the options were copied from the line referring to /windows/C
I was wondering what the part between "ntfs" and the zeros means. I see that it changed the group name of F to users but it seems a little redundant and I don't know what the rest is doing. Specifically, what does umask=0002 mean?
Should I modify this to give all users rwx access?

Also, I'm still having trouble changing the permissions for F (as well as the owner and group). I followed Franklin's instructions (modified to add writing permission instead) but to no avail. The following text is my attempt. What am I doing wrong? Is the best way perhaps to modify one of those options in
/etc/fstab? I would like all users to have rwx permission.

Thank you for your time.


jla@255:~> umount /windows/F
jla@255:~> su
Password:
255:/home/jlaing # cd /windows
255:/windows # chmod a+w F
255:/windows # exit
exit
jla@255:~> mount /windows/F
jla@255:~> ls -l /windows
total 16
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 2004-01-08 14:08 c -> C
dr-xr-xr-x 1 root users 8192 2004-01-07 01:01 C
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 2004-01-06 15:29 d -> D
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 2004-01-06 15:29 e -> E
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 2004-01-08 09:34 f -> F
dr-xr-xr-x 1 root users 4096 2004-01-06 02:46 F
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 1 2004-01-08 14:08 i -> I
dr-x------ 1 root root 4096 2004-01-06 05:35 I
jla@255:~>
 
Old 01-08-2004, 05:56 PM   #8
ac1980
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Trento, Italy
Distribution: Debian testing
Posts: 394

Rep: Reputation: 30
I love recycling
Quote:
2) FAT filesystem doesn't have the concept of 'owner' or 'permissions', so you must specify what users can/cannot do (to learn more about permissions, use 'man chmod')
I think in ntfs there is some ownership, still it's not in terms of unix owners
This is the relevant part of mount manpage ('man mount')

umask=value
Set the umask (the bitmask of the permissions that are not
present). The default is the umask of the current process. The
value is given in octal.

3) Probably what makes free software great is good to excellent documentation. if you feel courious/have a question about a command, the first thing to try is 'man commadname'. Pressing 'h' while in man pages takes you to viewer help. Take a minute to read the 'searching' section, it's worth it.
HOMEWORK: find the info on umask in muont man page with '/' and 'n' commands

Goodnite
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
problem unlocking screensaver acb67 Linux - General 6 01-31-2012 05:44 AM
6800nu unlocking? Jason711 Linux - Hardware 0 04-18-2005 02:51 AM
unlocking a directory chemdawg Linux - Newbie 4 01-26-2005 05:06 PM
Unlocking /root file Carpinus Linux - Newbie 4 01-16-2005 04:12 AM
Unlocking Windows partition Waldhorn34 Linux - Hardware 7 10-05-2004 01:41 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:03 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration