LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-24-2007, 12:18 AM   #1
CyberInfantry
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Fayetteville
Distribution: Ubuntu 7.10
Posts: 13

Rep: Reputation: 0
Unhappy Trouble Installing Software from ANY Distribution


I think I may have been born without that thing that most people have that tells them what they are supposed to do next, or even how to start.

For the past 8 months I've been considering delving into linux. I finally bit the bullet and installed Ubuntu 7.10 on my big beefy desktop after my third re-install of Windows in two weeks.

Immediately, I am hit with the same problem I've been being hit with ever since I even started thinking about switching over on a permanent basis.

I am completely inept at installing things.

Ideally, it runs like this.
unpack
./configure
make (as root?)
make install

Right? Well, that has never worked for me. Not on Kubuntu, Ubuntu, or Slackware 11.0.

I've done a little delving. This whole linux thing is completely new to me, but I thought I'd at least try to do a little research on my own. I've read a couple of how-to's, but they never seem to address my problems.

My most recent occurrence happened with the installation of nmap. This is from a fresh installation of Ubuntu 7.10 desktop edition for 32bit systems. I've installed all the updates it told me to, I've enabled my restricted network and video card drivers...

And apparently I am lacking a C compiler?

Every distro I've tried (from the impressively long list above... -.-) has yet to come with a C compiler. Isn't that supposed to be the most common method of installing programs on Linux is to compile them from source? It never works for me. I've read the "INSTALL" files that appear after I unpack. I've looked for "README" and "SETUP" files to read as well. The only clue I find that something is wrong is when I do "./configure" and it DOES somehow work, it quickly stops at "make" with the error that I have no C compiler.

So then I quest out to find out "how do I obtain a C compiler"? And here is another obstacle: it seems like everyone else just assumes the distro comes with it.

So... I guess I'm just at a loss. I've got no idea what to do next. How do I fix this? Is there something I can tell a distro before I install it that ensures it comes with these very necessary utilities?

I would love to embrace a free computing experience. I would love to eventually develope my own programming talent and be able to contribute.

Maybe I'm just too dumb for linux.

System Specs:
ASUS A8N-SLI Premium Motherboard
AMD 64 4000+ 2.4ghz overclocked to 2.64ghz
2gb Corsair XMS DDR-400 RAM
400gb Western Digital SATA Hard Drive
BFG nVidia GeForce 7900 GTX 512mb PCI-Express graphics card
 
Old 11-24-2007, 02:57 AM   #2
ciden
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Location: New Delhi, India
Distribution: PCLinuxOS 2010
Posts: 246
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 31
You have overclocked your cpu. A noob, huh?


Just in case you are serious, why dont you try a package manager.?

try installing gcc(GNU c compiler) using aptitude or synaptic.
Then compile all u want.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 04:11 AM   #3
btmiller
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: In the DC 'burbs
Distribution: Arch, Scientific Linux, Debian, Ubuntu
Posts: 4,275

Rep: Reputation: 370Reputation: 370Reputation: 370Reputation: 370
For (KXU)buntu:

Code:
apt-get install build-essential
to install a basic build environment. Really, though, you should install from APT as much as possible rather than compiling fromsource. It tends to make for easier installs/removals of software.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 11:30 AM   #4
CyberInfantry
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Fayetteville
Distribution: Ubuntu 7.10
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I had gotten this from a google search result of
"C compiler cannot create executables" and "ubuntu 7.10"

Even this would not install because I do not have GTK+ or whatever.

Code:
sudo aptitude update
sudo aptitude install build-essential
gcc -v
[Edit]
I just tried the
Code:
apt-get install build-essential
and got the following as a response:

Code:
BlahBlah@BlahBlah-desktop:~$ apt-get install build-essential
E: Could not open lock file /var/lib/dpkg/lock - open (13 Permission denied)
E: Unable to lock the administration directory (/var/lib/dpkg/), are you root?
BlahBlah@BlahBlah-desktop:~$ sudo apt-get install build-essential
[sudo] password for BlahBlah:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
build-essential is already the newest version.
0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
BlahBlah@BlahBlah-desktop:~$ wtf?
bash: wtf?: command not found

Last edited by CyberInfantry; 11-24-2007 at 11:34 AM. Reason: Did not want to double-post.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 11:36 AM   #5
CyberInfantry
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Fayetteville
Distribution: Ubuntu 7.10
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Please forgive the double post...

Quote:
Originally Posted by btmiller View Post
For (KXU)buntu:

Code:
apt-get install build-essential
to install a basic build environment. Really, though, you should install from APT as much as possible rather than compiling fromsource. It tends to make for easier installs/removals of software.
Where do you find what all is available on the apt? What is apt? Just a package management system?

And for that matter, when something is installed from source, apt, or synaptic, how do you access it? O.o
 
Old 11-24-2007, 12:22 PM   #6
DragonSlayer48DX
Registered User
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,454
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberInfantry View Post
Where do you find what all is available on the apt? What is apt? Just a package management system?

And for that matter, when something is installed from source, apt, or synaptic, how do you access it? O.o
Yes, apt is a package manager. Synaptic is a graphical front-end for apt. It can be found in the System -> Administration menu. Once opened, it will show the available packages in the Ubuntu repositories, and you can select them for download from the window. Once a package is installed, Synaptic will show where the launcher icon was placed.

Also, to add to btmiller's statement, compiling from source can cause a lot of trouble if you're not sure what you're doing.


Cheers

Last edited by DragonSlayer48DX; 11-24-2007 at 12:36 PM.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 01:48 PM   #7
CyberInfantry
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Fayetteville
Distribution: Ubuntu 7.10
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I googled "first things to do after installing ubuntu 7.10" and got a pretty good list. It took care of most things through apt-get, and then I went and explored through Synaptic.

I was really impressed with the amount of code available on those programs. I have no idea how many I installed that I had no need of and such, but it did make it easier for getting zsnes and other programs. :P I'll have to look again for nMap.

My only concern with the package manager is timely availablity:
do code developers post updates to the package managers automatically? is every bit of software available for Ubuntu (or Linux in general) available on those package managers? How reliable are they as a source for programs?


Thank you, any who add to this thread.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 02:18 PM   #8
DragonSlayer48DX
Registered User
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,454
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 74
Personally, I'd say the repositories are the most reliable source for new programs, as the packages have been tested for compatibility and stability with your distro before being added. Also, when you install through the package manager, the program is automatically added to the automatic updates list. And yes, new packages are constantly being added to the repositories as they become available.

Cheers

Last edited by DragonSlayer48DX; 11-24-2007 at 03:14 PM.
 
Old 11-24-2007, 10:43 PM   #9
birdbrained
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Posts: 19

Rep: Reputation: 0
A newbie with suggestion, for another newbie.

I cannot tell you anything about a c compiler but I have a question. Did you try Puppy Linux? I think Puppy Linux is great for first timers.It is small and up to date. Due to it's size,you can install it just to ram.You can also try it out without installing it to your hard drive.An already burned cd can be purchased at Osdic.com for $1.95 plus postage.The language used in Puppy is user friendly.
Do you still have Windows on your computer? You can try Puppy out ,just in ram,to see what you think. If you don't like it,don't save it and it won't affect your Windows.It might be possible to have both Windows and Puppy on your computer simultaneouly.
To install Puppy,you would have to set your computer to boot from the cd. That won't affect Windows unless there is a cd in the drive.
Experts,have I said anything incorrectly? Have I left anything out? Please review what I have written.I just sense this person has feelings I had when I was thinking of converting to Linux. Someone suggested Puppy Linux to me. I have really enjoyed learning about it.
 
Old 11-25-2007, 04:12 AM   #10
CyberInfantry
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Fayetteville
Distribution: Ubuntu 7.10
Posts: 13

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I *just* reinstalled Windows XP, and I am about to set it up to dual-boot Ubuntu. I really like the linux feel, but there are some needs that only Windows can meet right now.

I will give Puppy a try. Thank you for the suggestion. Lots of my friends are telling me that once I really do get things stuff figured out, it's really quite fun.

I really appreciate everyone's contributions to this thread. Thank you all very much!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
trouble installing software from source ol1v3rw Linux - Software 6 06-06-2006 01:14 PM
why there is so much of trouble in installing any software in linux? amolgupta Linux - Software 2 04-11-2005 01:18 PM
trouble installing software with yast UGT001 Linux - Software 1 12-24-2004 02:30 AM
trouble installing some software vr6stress Linux - Newbie 6 03-23-2004 01:02 AM
Trouble installing afterstep software shrndegruv Linux - Software 0 10-24-2003 10:52 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:52 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration