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Old 03-07-2011, 02:29 AM   #1
Chesong
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Question Totally new to the whole Linux Fourms


First of all I would like to hello to the Linux community.
I decided to join this forum because I would like to learn more on Linux.
I want to dual boot both Windows 7 and Linux. (is that a good idea?)

My computer is old so i'm not really sure if I should here are the specs and tell me if I should buy more ram or update anything.
Processor: Intel (R) Core (Tm)2 CPU 4400@2.00 Ghz 2.00Ghz
Installed memory (RAM) 2 GB
System type: 32 bit
I have 300 gb of hard drive memory

Thanks in advance
 
Old 03-07-2011, 02:41 AM   #2
sandy.bhadoriya
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yes you can go ahead with your current configuration
 
Old 03-07-2011, 05:12 AM   #3
EDDY1
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Welcome to linux.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 05:27 AM   #4
cascade9
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Having windows (any version really) and linux together on the same HDD shouldnt be a problem. When I was dual-booting I prefered to have a HDD for each OS, and have a bootloader on each HDD. Windows bootloader on the windows drive, GRUB (grand unified bootloader) on the linux drive. That way I could remove either HDD and still have a running OS with any fiddling.

Core2Duo T4400/2GB should run anything distro/desktop enviroment you want.

All Core2Duos are 64bit capable.

Quote:
Intel® 64 Yes
http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=40739

Intel 64 = AMD 64 = x86-64.

That doesnt mean you have to run a 64bit linux version.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 07:12 AM   #5
Soadyheid
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Quote:
My computer is old
It looks pretty good to me.You can generally find Linux distributions which will run on old Pentium kit. My first foray was with a dual Pentium Pro 200Mhz box!

I assume you've already got Windows 7 installed? If you've spent some time wandering through these forums, you'll know that there are things called Live CDs which have a bootable Linux distribution which allows you to try the operating system and some of the applications available unser Linux before you take the leap to installing?
I'd suggest you download a Live Ubuntu 10.10 CD (google the website) and download the .iso file. Burn the CD from the image with whatever you've got available under your Windows system; Roxio, etc, and try booting.

If you are happy, you can modify your 300Gb disk by partitioning it. This means by splitting it into two partitions which will look like two separate disks to the operating system.

You can find a program called GParted under the Admin menu. This allows you to shrink the size of your windows partition and free off space for the Linux install. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN WIPE YOUR WHOLE DISK WITH THIS PROGRAM! So you may want to run it up and look only before comming back to the forums for guidance.
It won't damage the hardware but it could damage your Windows 7 install!

Assuming you got through the partitioning, you'd have one partition with Windows 7 and another with nothing. Installing Ubuntu from the live CD is just clicking the install icon. When it gets to the partitioning section of the install, select the non-Windows partition and it should then go off and do its thing. At the end it installs the Grub2 boot loaded which will allow you to dual boot.


Does this help your understanding in any way or has your head just exploded?

Play Bonny!

Last edited by Soadyheid; 03-07-2011 at 07:14 AM. Reason: Warning!
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:15 AM   #6
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soadyheid View Post
You can find a program called GParted under the Admin menu. This allows you to shrink the size of your windows partition and free off space for the Linux install. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU CAN WIPE YOUR WHOLE DISK WITH THIS PROGRAM! So you may want to run it up and look only before comming back to the forums for guidance.
It won't damage the hardware but it could damage your Windows 7 install!
I would suggest not to use GParted to shink the Win7 install. Use the one windows tools for that, basic guide here-

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials...me-shrink.html

Using GParted would work, but its more likely to bork windows than using the windows tools.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 06:22 PM   #7
EDDY1
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Quote:
I would suggest not to use GParted to shink the Win7 install. Use the one windows tools for that, basic guide here-
Wins 7 can only reduce itself a maximum of 50%
Gparted-live shrink more & it also checks fs to make sure it's not doing damage or overwriting data.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:19 PM   #8
jefro
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You would be much better off using windows 7 to shrink a partition. Then you can blame them.

Actually I think it is a very bad idea to learn on a dual boot. No real reason since your computer is good enough to use virtual machines. Free virtual machines are one of the most safe, fast, easy ways to run multiple OS's. You don't need to shrink or move or worry about any data loss. Try one of these. They are all free and easy. VMplayer, Virtualbox, virtuaPC or maybe even try VMlite. (never tried last one yet)

Last edited by jefro; 03-07-2011 at 08:56 PM.
 
Old 03-08-2011, 06:14 AM   #9
Soadyheid
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@ jefro
Quote:
Actually I think it is a very bad idea to learn on a dual boot.
Hmmm... I don't see why it would be bad. You're using all the machines resources and if the OS gets damaged by your inexperienced hacking about, you just re-install it. Virtual machines are great but you have to realise that you've added a couple of layers of complexity and overhead; host OS and a VM hypervisor. (Like running Nortons Anti Virus on Windows? er... Maybe not.)

I reckon it's horses for courses, whatever suits, if it's just a home system. Isn't it great to have a choice!

My

Play Bonny!
 
Old 03-08-2011, 07:53 AM   #10
ntu929
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Re

hmm... u can check out Vector linux it works it low configuration and old architectures as well.
Vector linux can run on low RAM and HDD also



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesong View Post
First of all I would like to hello to the Linux community.
I decided to join this forum because I would like to learn more on Linux.
I want to dual boot both Windows 7 and Linux. (is that a good idea?)

My computer is old
 
Old 03-08-2011, 08:18 AM   #11
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDDY1 View Post
Wins 7 can only reduce itself a maximum of 50%
Gparted-live shrink more & it also checks fs to make sure it's not doing damage or overwriting data.
I've heard of people totally borking windows by resizing from GParted. Its still possible that the windows tools will bork it as well, but its far less likely to happen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ntu929 View Post
hmm... u can check out Vector linux it works it low configuration and old architectures as well.
Vector linux can run on low RAM and HDD also
A core2duo with 2GB "low configuration and old architecture"? You've got to be joking...

If you want to run Vector linux on a machine like that, go ahead, but its not going to make any real difference compared to slackware with the same desktop environment.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 12:20 AM   #12
ntu929
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post

A core2duo with 2GB "low configuration and old architecture"? You've got to be joking...

If you want to run Vector linux on a machine like that, go ahead, but its not going to make any real difference compared to slackware with the same desktop environment.
i think i was misunderstood... what i meant was that the performance and speed of the system may be good in case of Vector Linux.

i am sorry in case it was sarcastic in any way....

i had tried running Vector Linux on following desktop configuration and it was running at good speed.

Processor:PIV. @ 1.7 GHZ clock speed
Graphics card: Intel.
RAM:256 MB.
HDD:80GB.
OS:Win 2000, Win xp, Linux(Vector Linux).
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:22 AM   #13
cascade9
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ntu929, it wasn't sarcastic, and in some ways you are right, vector linux performance should be good on that system. But so would everything else.

If I put number in they would be made up. Though I really should get of my butt and actually do a multi-distro, multi-computer comparison between a few 'light' distro and some normal distros, using some ancient hardware and some more modern hardware.

What you would see in my expereince is that the 'light' distros would start faster, and run on less RAM, even with the more modern hardware. But its not going to be worth it. If you have 2GB, the difference between using 100MB of RAM idle vs using 200MB isnt really worth worrying about. With 256MB, it sure is. Start times would be more complicated, but would still not be worth it on the more modern system IMO.

I've used those early P4s, they are not quick at all. The 400MHz/256k cache models are particularly bad (which is what your 1.7GHz model would be).

BTW, going purely off clock speed is misleading. A 2GHz P4 is a lot slower than a 2GHz Athlon XP, which is slower than a 2GHz Athlon X2 (dual core), and so on.

Last edited by cascade9; 03-09-2011 at 09:01 AM. Reason: typos.....one of these days I'll learn to speel :P
 
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Old 03-09-2011, 06:39 AM   #14
ntu929
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Re:Totally new to the linux forums

Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
ntu929, it was scarcastic, and in some ways you are right, vector linux perfroamnce should be good on that system. But so would everything else.

If I put number in they would be made up. Though I really should get of my butt and actually do a multi-distro, multi-computer comparison between a few 'light' distro and some normal distros, using some ancient hardware and some more modern hardware.

What you would see in my expereince is that the 'light' distros would start faster, and run on less RAM, even with the more modern hardware. But its not going to be worth it. If you have 2GB, the difference between using 100MB of RAM idle vs using 200MB isnt really worth worrying about. With 256MB, it sure is. Start times would be more complicated, but would still not be worth it on the more modern system IMO.

I've used those early P4s, they are not quick at all. The 400MHz/256k cache models are particularly bad (which is what your 1.7GHz model would be).

BTW, going purely off clock speed is isleading. A 2GHz P4 is a lot slower than a 2GHz Athlon XP, which is slower than a 2GHz Athlon X2 (dual core), and so on.
So cascade9, what would you suggest for ideal user in case of light distros?

i intended not to bring number herein. But u see all this may be relative to specific environments also.
again i am going into specifics such as types of HDDs,RAM(static/dynamic)(Static being highly obsolete). Just as you mentioned the type of processors(Athlon) with its own specifics. Please correct me in case i am wrong ...

Regards
 
Old 03-09-2011, 09:45 AM   #15
cascade9
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I'd like to apologise to Chesong for semi-derailing this thread, and to ntu929 for the huge number of typos I put in my last post. Some of those typos changed the meaning of what I was saying as well. Too late, I should have been in bed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ntu929 View Post
So cascade9, what would you suggest for ideal user in case of light distros?
I think you mean 'what would I suggest to use for light distros'. Sorry if I've misread that. There is no simple answer.

It all depends on how slow the machine is, how much RAM you have, how many machines you are using and how much experience you have.

Some people like to run the same distro for all the machines they have. I tend to, thats why most of my machines are either debian or debian based. That is my choice, there is nothing wrong with running all Slackware, Fedora, Arch, Gentoo, OpenSUSE and so on. If you've got a distro you know well, or are just starting it does make life a lot easier.

I have various computers I can use, ranging from a Intel P3-866/256MB machine up to a AMD Phenom II X2 550 (unlockable to quad core if I want)/4GB DDR3/8600GT, and they all run just fine with some variant on debian.

In my opnion, unless you have very low spec computers you would be best of using one of the major distros and using different desktops. I like KDE on the faster machines I have with dual-core CPUs and good video cards (KDE is video card dependent IMO) . I like Xfce on the slower machines, and machines with nasty video cards. Again, thats my choice, there is no problem with running gnome, lxde, E16/E17, openbox, fluxbox, JWM or other DEs I've forgotten about, or dont even know about.

To people with more expereince, or with a very slow machine, and a different faster machine running 2 totally different distros would probably be better. Eg- Puppy linux on the 48MB Pentuim 200, Gentoo on the i3/i5/i7/athlonII/PhenomII machine.

Vector Linux is slackware based. I've used it, abut I really dont know enough about slackware or vector linux to say much about it. If you are happy with vector linux, keep using it. Unless one of the people who actually know far more than me about those distros have some words of wisdom, I would say there is no need to reinstall with slackware just because of my theory or beliefs.

If you ever do go to reinstall, and have the bandwidth to d/l a new .iso, give slackware a try (or a different distro if you want). You might be suprised at how little difference there is between slackware and vector linux with whatever desktop you are using.

Yes, the athlon is has a different CPU, socket, and chipsets to the Intels. The RAM, HDDs etc are the same between them though. I just used the athlon as an example becuase I happened to know offhand that there was 2.0GHz athlon XPs and 2.0GHz athlon X2 CPU.

Last edited by cascade9; 03-09-2011 at 11:08 AM.
 
  


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