LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-04-2008, 07:32 AM   #16
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181

Quote:
Originally Posted by TentativeChaos View Post
Ok, so I booted from the CD now I'm installing it and I chose a custom install because I want to partition the hard drive so that Vista isn't deleted. How do I do that?
That depends on what you already did to get the partitions into the strange condition shown in that picture. Try providing more info when asking a question.

Maybe an expert here can deduce a lot from the hint that the partitioning program can't determine the Used amount on your larger ntfs partition. I can't.

Maybe you used Vista to shrink your C: partition to around 10Gb and to create a D: partition in the free space, and then you didn't finish initializing the D: partition of about 300Gb (which is fine because you didn't really want it created at all).

If that is all true then the first step in the Linux partitioning tool is to delete the partition in /dev/sda3. However, if there is some other reason you have two ntfs partitions, and you have data in the big one, then you don't want to touch it in Linux until you do something (probably shrink it) in Vista.

Once you have free space, from deleting a bad ntfs partition if Vista created one, or from correctly shrinking an ntfs partition, then you want to create (in a Linux partitioning tool) the two or three partitions needed for Linux.

I've seen some recent threads discussing how big those should be, but I haven't seen any clear answers. It depends on your intended use. But you probably can't get a good answer from that either. If most of that 300Gb is available, you can afford to make the root partition bigger than you need and make the swap partition bigger than you need and still have most of the space (also likely more than you need) available for a /home partition.

For the actual mechanics of deleting and creating partitions, I'm not sure the partitioning program you're using in Ubuntu is the same as the one I just used in Mepis, but try this and see. IIRC, I was was able to start each action by right clicking on the line in the partition list and selecting the desired action from the context menu: Right click on the garbage partition (IF THAT IS WHAT IT IS) and select delete. Right click on the empty space that creates and select create a new partition and tell it how much space to take (do that for root and for swap then home, taking all the remaining space for home).

Last edited by johnsfine; 02-04-2008 at 07:37 AM.
 
Old 02-04-2008, 01:03 PM   #17
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 4,165

Rep: Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223Reputation: 1223
For the size of Linux partitions:

10GB should do for the root partition: I have that and it's still half-empty after installing Fedora and assorted extra software

Make the swap partition bigger than the maximum amount of memory you expect to get (some of the partition is used for internal admin): this will let you hibernate and give you a quick start (if Ubuntu supports it)

The rest can be /home
 
Old 02-04-2008, 01:53 PM   #18
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
TentativeChaos
I nearly had a heart attack when I saw your screenshot. Please cancel that operation.

All your partitions are used by windows. You need some spare space. You do not have any.
Whilst it is possible for you to shrink your windows partition(s) to make space for linux, may I gently suggest that this may not be the best course for you to follow, as an absolute newbie?

Disks are cheap now. Buy another one, plug it in, boot from the linux install CD, and install to your shiny new disk. That way less chance of nasty trouble . When you get better at linux, you can play with gradually shrinking your windows partitions until they eventually disappear completely, and you finally find you are happy! (That's what happened to me )
 
Old 02-04-2008, 02:42 PM   #19
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
Quote:
Originally Posted by tredegar View Post
All your partitions are used by windows.
Did you see something I didn't see?

What makes you think the second ntfs partition is in use? I didn't see enough to be sure it isn't (see my earlier post). But more likely than not, it isn't in use.

Quote:
Whilst it is possible for you to shrink your windows partition(s) to make space for linux, may I gently suggest that this may not be the best course for you to follow, as an absolute newbie?
As a newbie myself, I do have to agree the person we are trying to help is significantly newbier. But I don't think shrinking a Vista partition is really that hard.

Quote:
Disks are cheap now. Buy another one, plug it in, boot from the linux install CD, and install to your shiny new disk. That way less chance of nasty trouble
I wouldn't bet that approach is easier. Do you know how things are laid out mechanically inside his case? Sometimes that can be quite a challenge. Are you sure his motherboard has a spare SATA connector? (We'll assume SATA. It is easier and more likely than older ATA). Does he know whether/what cable he needs to buy? What about the power connector? Then there will be extra chances to make a partitioning error or a GRUB install error by getting confused about which drive is which.

External disks save all those mechanical issues but are more expensive and generally lower performance and even more likely to confuse a newbie during a Linux install.

There's a good chance TentativeChaos already correctly shrank his C: partition. Then he or Vista created a D: partition he doesn't want. If so, then once he's sure that is what happened he can kill the D: partition and continue installing Linux.

I've heard lots of bad things about Vista. I used it once for 15 minutes in a store and really hated it. It certainly has the design philosophy of guess what the user should have wanted to do and do that even if the user tries to do something else. So maybe when you shrink C: it automatically helps you out by creating D:. I don't know and hope it is a long time before I need to know.
 
Old 02-04-2008, 03:07 PM   #20
tredegar
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian "Jessie"
Posts: 6,085

Rep: Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398Reputation: 398
Quote:
All your partitions are used by windows.
I should have said allocated to windows.

I have no idea what he has stored there and whether it is important to him. So I am suggesting the safest thing for him to do. If he wants to shrink his NTFS partitions he's welcome to do that. And you are most welcome to help him, by providing precise, fail-safe instructions rather than saying "But I don't think shrinking a Vista partition is really that hard."

I have never used vista and cannot recommend, from experience, any methods of shrinking its partitions. So I do not.

Quote:
Do you know how things are laid out mechanically inside his case?
No I do not, but if he is hardware-challenged, he is welcome to say so and someone more vista-aware than I am can help him further if he wishes to pursue the software solution to repartitioning.
 
Old 02-04-2008, 04:03 PM   #21
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsfine View Post
Did you see something I didn't see?
I was perfectly serious in asking that question. I'm trying to help in this thread, but I'm also trying to learn. Someone (who knows that partitioning program MUCH better than I do) understands why the "Used" column is "unknown" for /dev/sda3 in that picture. Someone might see some other detail I'm ignoring entirely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tredegar View Post
So I am suggesting the safest thing for him to do.
I didn't (and still don't) intend to offend anyone. But I've had a lot of experience calling customer support at Dell and similar operations. Describe any problem that they can't solve easily and they will come up with a plan involving excess delay and expense and/or effort for the user. That plan is never better (for the user) than some plan with less delay. Usually it is much less likely to succeeed. The point is that the delay benefits the customer support person. The user is off the phone now. They won't call back soon. When they do call back (because the slow, expensive, difficult idea did no good) they'll talk to someone else. Or better yet, they may give up entirely (because the suggested plan was too expensive or hard) and simply write off their investment in the product whose support is failing them.

Your suggestion felt like one of those. More delay and more expense than continuing the current effort, but no more likely to work. Just more likely to get rid of the request for help. Since we made no commitment to help in the first place, it would make more sense to just say "I'm sorry, the amount of hand holding you are requesting is greater than the amount I'm willing to give". With TentativeChaos, I'm close to that point.

Quote:
And you are most welcome to help him, by providing precise, fail-safe instructions
Obviously not going to happen. I have neither the required knowledge nor the required patience. The task itself would be easy for a newbie of my level. But writing "precise, fail-safe instructions" is harder than doing the task blindfolded. There are only a few computer tasks I can do blindfolded. Definitely not this one.

Quote:
rather than saying "But I don't think shrinking a Vista partition is really that hard."
I guess we'll disagree there. Wanting more hand holding than that doesn't mean needing more hand holding than that. I still think he could do it easily if he decided to pay attention to what he is doing rather than ask for more hand holding.

Last edited by johnsfine; 02-04-2008 at 04:08 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newbie thinking of switching to Linux from XP/Vista. Options and Advice... Mysticle31 Linux - Newbie 38 11-27-2007 03:18 PM
Thinking about switching from Windows to Linux ... BeachBilly Linux - Newbie 8 06-23-2007 04:38 AM
thinking of switching to linux streetrat Linux - Newbie 1 02-27-2007 12:28 PM
Thinking About Switching to Linux for the Desktop ljeevan Linux - General 4 06-06-2006 04:40 AM
thinking of switching to slack bosewicht Slackware 9 11-20-2003 10:08 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:05 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration