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Old 04-11-2008, 10:44 AM   #1
Flowbie
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Thinking of Installing Linux & Gnome


I've got a Gateway2000 running windows xp. I think
it has a 2ghz processor and a pathetic 128 megs of
RAM.

I heard that Linux runs well on lower end computers.
XP runs like a crippled snail for me sometimes.

About the installation process - I read that I need
to partition my hard drive and some other things. If
anyone knows of a good guide or how to that would be
very beneficial I would imagine.

I'd really like to try linux and am interested in using
a desktop such as gnome or any other quality desktop, but
I don't want to screw up my pc. Any tips or recommendations
would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 
Old 04-11-2008, 10:54 AM   #2
pixellany
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Welcome to LQ!!

On my P-III with 128M ram Windows 2000 was hopeless. Increasing it to 192M made a huge difference.

Now with 192M, every Linux version I have tried runs with no problems.

Install all the RAM you can afford....

Do you want dual-boot or just Linux alone?

See the links below for more help....
 
Old 04-11-2008, 10:58 AM   #3
Flowbie
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I'd like to dual boot. Is it pretty easy to switch between the two??
 
Old 04-11-2008, 02:32 PM   #4
inspiron_Droid
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Smile

I havwe tried every thing From FreeBSD, PCBSD, Ubuntu, Fedora Core, Debian(pre woody) to Slack Ware. My Two favorites as of yet are Slack Ware and FreeBSD as I am twenty years young in life but thirty-three yeasr old due to thae fact that I prefer to do as much as posaible via command line utilities. IMHO, If you are ready to dive headlong int linux go with slackware because despite it ratehr steep learning curve what with having to hand configure X11 and pretty darn near every thing else you will rapidly gain both known how and trouble shootin experience.! :P:P
 
Old 04-11-2008, 02:40 PM   #5
3rods
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I find Ubuntu is the easiest for new users of linux. I don't run it on as server anymore (now I use Fedora 8), but it was a good stepping stone to learning linux and debian flavors of linux. I still prefer it for desktops and laptops.

Everyone has there own favorite flavors though.


linux-Hawk Check your sig. I think you have a typo. If it's not a typo, I wouldn't recommend telling time like that or putting it on a wall...
 
Old 04-11-2008, 02:42 PM   #6
jay73
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Quote:
I'd like to dual boot. Is it pretty easy to switch between the two??
Sure, the installer will place a menu on your hard drive so you can select operating systems when the systems boots up.

128MB RAM may be a bit too modest to have Gnome running - or at least running well. Maybe you should consider installing something that has XFCE rather than Gnome (such as Xubuntu, which comes with XFCE pre-installed but you can install XFCE on any distro). XFCE looks VERY different from a Windows desktop, however. I'm sure you'll find screenshots on the net to give you an idea.
 
Old 04-11-2008, 02:54 PM   #7
The Other Guy
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I would recommend Ubuntu if you're an absolute beginner, because it will partition your hard drive for you. Just select dual-boot and choose how much room you want each operating system to have. It's a great OS for beginners (like me).

I can't believe I'm giving this advice when I was in your position just four months ago.
 
Old 04-11-2008, 04:45 PM   #8
Flowbie
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Thanks for all the advice. Seeing as how I am an absolute beginner I'm going to
look into Ubuntu. I've never had the need to partition my hd, so I'm a little
hesitant to do that. Probably going to buy some more RAM when I get the chance
as well.

I actually have 2 more questions.

Are there ways to run Win programs in Linux?I know that on a Mac there are a few
that will actually let you run Windows programs and OS9 progs as well.

Does Linux offer most things that are available in Windows? ie mp3 players,
internet browsers, games etc...
 
Old 04-11-2008, 05:11 PM   #9
sajro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flowbie View Post
Are there ways to run Win programs in Linux?I know that on a Mac there are a few
that will actually let you run Windows programs and OS9 progs as well.

Does Linux offer most things that are available in Windows? ie mp3 players,
internet browsers, games etc...
Wine is the most common (and free) Windows-software-on-Linux solution, but there are also Cedega and CrossoverOffice, which cost money. However, you'll often find Linux equivalents better than their Windows counterparts.

"MP3" players: amaroK, Songbird, Rhythmbox, Listen, XMMS (compatible w/ Winamp themes), and more. Take your pick!

Browsers: Firefox, Flock, Konqueror, Epiphany, and others.

Games: often considered the Linux Achilles Heel, but there are plenty of awesome Open Source games, Linux versions of games like "Wolfenstein," and there's always Wine and Cedega for the others.

It's quite mature! Welcome to Linux!
 
Old 04-11-2008, 06:48 PM   #10
Flowbie
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Alright, finally home from work and I started looking into Xumbutu.
I'm not quite sure if I understand, it says I need a cd to install,
LiveCd, Install CD. Do I just dl it and burn it to a cd for installation?
And it also says that I should have at least 192 in ram. I've
got 128 at the moment, but I'll be getting some ram next month some
time.

Should I wait to install this or would 128 cut it for a month?

Thanks a lot, and sorry for asking so many questions
 
Old 04-11-2008, 07:13 PM   #11
jay73
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Quote:
Do I just dl it and burn it to a cd for installation?
Yes, download the alternate Xubuntu install cd, not the live cd. It does not have the fanciest installer but that is why it will work even with less than 192MB (I believe that only 64 is required). Of course, the alternate cd is only good for installing, unlike the livecd it cannot be used to run the operating system live from cd.

Bear in mind that the cd has to be burnt as an iso (or image), not as a regular data cd. Decent burning applications should all have an option to do that.
 
Old 04-11-2008, 08:03 PM   #12
cizzi
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I personally like debian's netinst cd, its small to download and then when you install it only downloads and installs the modules you need. Saves alot of time and configuration hassles.
 
Old 04-11-2008, 09:43 PM   #13
Doctorzongo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flowbie View Post
I've got a Gateway2000 running windows xp. I think
it has a 2ghz processor and a pathetic 128 megs of
RAM.

I heard that Linux runs well on lower end computers.
XP runs like a crippled snail for me sometimes.

About the installation process - I read that I need
to partition my hard drive and some other things. If
anyone knows of a good guide or how to that would be
very beneficial I would imagine.

I'd really like to try linux and am interested in using
a desktop such as gnome or any other quality desktop, but
I don't want to screw up my pc. Any tips or recommendations
would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
KDE is superior to GNOME. We will incorporate GNOME's uniqueness into our entity. Resistance is futile.

:-D

Try DSL Linux.
Or KNOPPIX (English KNOPPIX download page is: http://knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html)

as a Live CD. This will enable you to run Linux on an older computer with out modifying your hard drive -- it will run off the CD Drive.

You can also try Ubuntu. For older computers, XUbuntu would be better.

Good luck!
 
  


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