LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-03-2010, 03:17 PM   #1
dunnery
Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Location: East Stroudsburg
Distribution: Debian Jessie
Posts: 211

Rep: Reputation: 8
the confusing world before me


hi guys, im am completely new to this linx world so please have a little patience. i am very experienced with computers but not with programming. I would like to know how do I instal programs? there is an astrology program that I would like to use but I cannot understand how to install it. the program is here http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20...Skylendar.html

do I need to download a terminal? where do i type in the program data?

sorry for my ignorance, i will be making a concerted effort to learn this stuff but you have to start somewhere. thank you in advance.

francis
 
Old 05-03-2010, 03:20 PM   #2
custangro
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: California
Distribution: Fedora , CentOS , RHEL
Posts: 1,970
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 208Reputation: 208Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunnery View Post
hi guys, im am completely new to this linx world so please have a little patience. i am very experienced with computers but not with programming. I would like to know how do I instal programs? there is an astrology program that I would like to use but I cannot understand how to install it. the program is here http://www.linuxlinks.com/article/20...Skylendar.html

do I need to download a terminal? where do i type in the program data?

sorry for my ignorance, i will be making a concerted effort to learn this stuff but you have to start somewhere. thank you in advance.

francis
First what version of Linux are you running?

-C
 
Old 05-03-2010, 03:22 PM   #3
Hangdog42
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Maryland
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,803
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 416Reputation: 416Reputation: 416Reputation: 416Reputation: 416
Welcome to LQ!

The short answer is that there are usually two ways of installing software: From your distro's repository or from source. Since software installation is one of the areas where there is significant differences between distros, if you tell us which distro you are using, we can probably give you a better answer.
 
Old 05-03-2010, 03:44 PM   #4
broken
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Location: Your mom's trailer
Distribution: NetBSD
Posts: 31

Rep: Reputation: 15
I'm betting $10 on Ubuntu.

Just in case I turn out to be right, I'll save the OP some time. Taken from https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Astrology :

Quote:
Skylendar

Skylendar is succesor of Kastrolog, these also Astrolog derivatives. KAstrolog cannot probably be installed because its dependancies on old QT libraries (?), while Skylendar is newer, unformately there are no binaries or packages, again compilation is necessary. This is only for experienced users (compilation). Author has on its pages special Ubuntu binary (skylendar.bz.2), but this one file is not enough for program to run. So, if you are not experienced Linux administrator or have not such acquaintace, I would not recommend to fiddle with this. Better try Astrolog32, which has also more functions. Home page: http://skylendar.kde.org/
So, unformately, there seems to be no easy way to get that program to work on Ubuntu, especially for a new user such as yourself.

Last edited by broken; 05-03-2010 at 03:49 PM.
 
Old 05-04-2010, 07:26 AM   #5
dunnery
Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Location: East Stroudsburg
Distribution: Debian Jessie
Posts: 211

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 8
ha ha someone just won $10 although I'm not sure who is supposed to pay it.
I am indeed using ubuntu

I have bought a book called linux for dummies so i will be getting stuck into that for the next few .... years

thank you to 'broken' for researching the astrology software, i will take your advice and download astrolog32

thank you
 
Old 05-04-2010, 07:27 AM   #6
dunnery
Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Location: East Stroudsburg
Distribution: Debian Jessie
Posts: 211

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hangdog42 View Post
Welcome to LQ!

The short answer is that there are usually two ways of installing software: From your distro's repository or from source. Since software installation is one of the areas where there is significant differences between distros, if you tell us which distro you are using, we can probably give you a better answer.
what is a distro's repository? does it mean the distributors storage space where they keep the data for their programs?

is distro 'ubuntu'?
 
Old 05-04-2010, 07:39 AM   #7
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 8,576
Blog Entries: 31

Rep: Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunnery View Post
what is a distro's repository? does it mean the distributors storage space where they keep the data for their programs?

is distro 'ubuntu'?
A distro's repository are where they keep packages used for installing software. The packages contain all the files, settings etc required. Packages are downloaded onto the computer and unpacked during the installation procedure.

ubuntu is a distro. Wikipedia has a fuller explanation.
 
Old 05-04-2010, 07:39 AM   #8
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
The repository is simply a website where program and utilities are stored. These are generally in the form of "packages" that include system instructions for installing the software.

Each distro (version) of Linux uses a "package manager" to get software from the repository and install it on the computer.

Yes---"Ubuntu" is the name of a popular Linux distro. Is that what you have?
 
Old 05-04-2010, 07:51 AM   #9
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,542
Blog Entries: 23

Rep: Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943
Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

'How to Ask Questions the Smart Way' would be one link you should look at to help us to help you in the future.

Just a few more links to aid your endeavors;

Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking
Virtualiation- Top 10


The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 05-04-2010, 08:21 AM   #10
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunnery View Post
does it mean the distributors storage space where they keep the data for their programs?
When you use the package manager, you'll notice it is getting packages from several repositories. There are a few reasons a distribution has its software divided into several repositories. The most important reason for a Debian based distribution, such as Ubuntu, is that Ubuntu repositories only need to hold the software that is different from the corresponding version of Debian. The package manager will get packages from Debian if they aren't overridden by Ubuntu.

Debian is another distribution, which is more complete than other distributions (probably more complete than any other distribution). But Debian is not as beginner friendly as Ubuntu. Since Ubuntu is based on Debian, you get the advantages of Ubuntu without missing the completeness of Debian.
 
Old 05-04-2010, 08:46 AM   #11
savvaio
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
Hi, I'm also new to linux world. I want to start using Linux as my primary operating system on my personal PC, as I feel this is a great first step to really force myself to learn it. I need to know what distribution would be best for me to use. I want to find one to learn on that will best allow me to be comfortable on any linux I run into in the future. Thanks much for your advice!

Last edited by pixellany; 05-04-2010 at 08:50 AM. Reason: removed sig with advertising
 
Old 05-04-2010, 08:52 AM   #12
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
savvaio;

Welcome to LQ!!

I removed the advertising link in your post---if you want to advertise here, please see the links at the bottom of the page. There is also a jobs marketplace section.

Please remove the link from your signature before posting again.

Last edited by pixellany; 05-04-2010 at 08:54 AM.
 
Old 05-04-2010, 09:26 AM   #13
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 7,177

Rep: Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210Reputation: 2210
In the Windows world, there's a rather vast number of pre-installed system libraries, maintained and supplied (pretty much) by Microsoft, which form the (only...) foundation of libraries that "everyone can count on." Beyond that, easy-to-use installers are provided to correctly install whatever piece of software you just bought, and those applications are normally shipped with "everything that they need."

In the Linux world, it's similar but different. Software is assembled into "packages," and there's some kind of easy-to-use installation process for those packages -- same as Windows. But since Linux is a substantially more diverse system (it runs on more than 21 different types of hardware, after all...) it relies much more on the notion of "package dependencies." One package might require another one to be installed first (or at the same time), ad infinitum.

Another very-refreshing change in the Linux system is that you can have many different versions of the same software on your system at the same time, without conflict. The package management software therefore is able to detect when a new version of something is needed, and whether-or-not the old version needs to remain in place. You will also find tools that can comb through your system, detecting obsolete versions of things that are no longer required by any other installed package.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I am confusing ram_rajavarapu Linux - Enterprise 3 11-12-2008 07:54 PM
very confusing metallica1973 Linux - Software 5 08-07-2006 08:21 PM
this is so confusing!! theguitarness Linux - Newbie 5 03-07-2006 11:53 PM
so confusing c12ayon Programming 5 10-27-2003 12:52 AM
Very confusing rm Luc Linux - Newbie 3 11-04-2002 02:42 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:38 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration