LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - Newbie (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/)
-   -   Terminal emulator on Linux (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/terminal-emulator-on-linux-786544/)

elainelaw 02-02-2010 06:06 PM

Terminal emulator on Linux
 
We use Netterm as terminal emulator on windows , it works fine , is there any terminal emulator have the similar function that can be run on Linux ? thanks

chrism01 02-02-2010 07:12 PM

What's wrong with the built-in ones?
PS Please add distro & version to your profile.

lwasserm 02-02-2010 07:22 PM

I'm not familiar with Netterm for windows but there are many terminal programs for linux. All the major desktop environments have their own, such as gnome-terminal, konsole for KDE, xfce-terminal, etc. and there is xterm which runs on any system using X. I googled netterm and see that it has a dialer. If you need dialup access to a system you can install minicom or check your distribution for similar packages.

If you need a specific capability that netterm provides, describe your needs and I'm sure you'll get many suggestions.

SkiTz0.BiLL-BoB 02-02-2010 07:31 PM

I like Yakuake, runs quietly and invisibly in the bkg until you need it, then vanishes again afterwards. If that's any help.

jefro 02-02-2010 07:34 PM

Almost all linux distro's have a terminal. You can set it to emulate almost any terminal.

catkin 02-03-2010 01:50 AM

While looking for a terminal emulator (because Xfce's did not meet my requirements) I found these: 9term, aterm, fbiterm, gtkiterm, gnome-terminal, konsole, Lxterm, mlterm, mrxvt, ROXterm, rxvt, Sakura, wterm, xterm. I chose mrxvt and am very happy with it.

What are your needs in a terminal emulator?

t2000 02-03-2010 04:32 AM

I like xfce4's Terminal very much, mrxvt is also nice but doesn't support UTF.

catkin 02-03-2010 04:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by t2000 (Post 3850584)
I like xfce4's Terminal very much, mrxvt is also nice but doesn't support UTF.

There were two things I wanted Terminal to do that I was not able to configure. The first was to have a different colour scheme when running it as root and as an ordinary user; the second was to change the window title a) to the current directory on using cd and b) to show the name of the file being edited when using vim.

Lack of UTF support has not, so far, been an issue.

clowenstein 02-03-2010 12:06 PM

Terminal emulator on Linux
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by catkin (Post 3850599)
There were two things I wanted Terminal to do that I was not able to configure. The first was to have a different colour scheme when running it as root and as an ordinary user; the second was to change the window title a) to the current directory on using cd and b) to show the name of the file being edited when using vim.

Lack of UTF support has not, so far, been an issue.

This is not so much a Terminal problem as it is a BASH problem. You can configure your shell to do many different things with the terminal Title Bar. For more information than you really wanted, see

<http://www.linuxselfhelp.com/howtos/Bash-Prompt/Bash-Prompt-HOWTO-12.html>

<http://tinyurl.com/yjrbw8w>

vorbote 02-04-2010 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elainelaw (Post 3850145)
We use Netterm as terminal emulator on windows , it works fine , is there any terminal emulator have the similar function that can be run on Linux ? thanks

Elaine, you have already received lots of suggestions on terminal emulators you can use with either a graphical windows manager (e.g., fluxbox and openbox to mention the better known) or a desktop environment (e.g., GNOME, KDE, Xfce to mention the most popular). Yet, no one has stated the obvious: There is a big difference between a terminal emulator under windows and a terminal emulator under a POSIX-like operating system.

NetTerm is, before anything else, a modem dialer with integrated terminal emulator, you know, the kind one used to connect to BBSs (if you are old enough to know the term, older to have used them). As such, it supports streaming file transfer protocols such as X-MODEM, Y-MODEM, Z-MODEM and a couple more I don't recall off-hand. It even works as an emulator for batch-mode terminals such as the IBM tn3270. As time passed (the first time I used NetTerm was with MS Windows 3.1.1 and Trumpet Winsock to connect to our central UNIX server of the day; Microsoft had not deemed TCP/IP important enough to support it in its offering back then) NetTerm grew organically slapping in more and more features until it became a kitchen sink.

OTH, in POSIXy operating systems, a terminal emulator is simply that. All extra functionality is provided by other programs, following the UNIX philosophy of "do one thing and do it well". That includes the command line, provided by a shell program (in GNU/Linux it is bash except in the oddest of circumstances).

Thus your question is too vague to receive a useful answer. Try restating it in terms such as "In Windows we use NetTerm to connect to an IBM terminal, use SSH to connect to remote server, etc. How can I do the same in GNU/Linux?" I'm sure someone will beat me up to give you a good answer to your questions.

jefro 02-04-2010 05:28 PM

Good place to start.

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Text-Terminal-HOWTO.html#toc2.2

axobeauvi 02-09-2010 08:42 AM

good thread
 
this might be a bit off topic, but does anyone know one that does wyse60?
there was a free one a few years ago, but it won't build on modern distos and doesn't seem to be actively maintained.

jefro 02-09-2010 04:04 PM

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=90810

vorbote 02-13-2010 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by axobeauvi (Post 3857844)
this might be a bit off topic, but does anyone know one that does wyse60?
there was a free one a few years ago, but it won't build on modern distos and doesn't seem to be actively maintained.

Adding to Jefro's link, which basically tells you to use telnet with the environment variable defining the terminal definition to use, see telnet(1) and the manual page of your favorite shell (bash(1)?):

Most package-managed distros include only a minimal set of terminfo definitions in the base install and you have to add an extra package to add the rest, including the Wyse 60.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:14 PM.