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tevinjoseph 07-04-2011 10:31 AM

system administrator
 
what commands i need to master with, to become system administrator

repo 07-04-2011 10:31 AM

All off them ;-)

Kind regards

tevinjoseph 07-04-2011 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by repo (Post 4404477)
All off them ;-)

Kind regards

thanks for reply.can you specify some commands

i92guboj 07-04-2011 10:37 AM

You can start reading here:

http://tldp.org/LDP/sag/html/sag.html

TobiSGD 07-04-2011 10:38 AM

You don't only need to master the commands, you also need to understand how the system works, how to install and configure the services you need and so on. You can't get that knowledge from a thread on a forum, read a book or two on that topic or take a course.

tevinjoseph 07-04-2011 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by i92guboj (Post 4404484)
You can start reading here:

http://tldp.org/LDP/sag/html/sag.html


thank u. i think this might help me

anomie 07-04-2011 11:57 AM

@tevinjoseph: in addition to having a deep bag of tricks (known commands for appropriate situations), becoming a competent sysadmin means adopting a particular mindset and gaining a lot of experience through experimentation - and the school of hard knocks.

If I could make some specific recommendations for you to follow, they'd be precisely these:
  • Get a book, and read it cover to cover. (If you're like me, you prefer paper copy to electronic "print".) One of the more comprehensive texts I have read is the UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook, by Nemeth, Snyder, Hein, Whaley. The first and second times you read it, lots of it will be Greek. No matter. You will get something new each read.
  • Pick a Linux distribution. If your goal is employment, then I suggest you choose either CentOS or Debian, period. Install it, break it, fix it, blow it away, install it, set up services, configure them, break them, fix them, blow it all away, develop and test disaster recovery methods, compile a custom kernel, automate tasks with shell scripts, etc., ad infinitum.
  • Read the book again. Notice how new concepts pop out during the latest read.
  • Back to your chosen distro for more tinkering. Now it's time to learn about TCP, UDP, IP, and ICMP. (That's a good twelve months out. You can post again then.)

There's no quick track to doing this well. If there was, every schmuck would do it, and we'd all be paid US$0.55 / hour. Apart from the specific advice above, what I can tell you is to become passionate about it and be persistent. If you're in it strictly for the money, you will be disappointed. Better become an investment banker instead (and learn how to rip off your fellow countrymen).

tevinjoseph 07-04-2011 12:12 PM

@anomie

thank u for ur information. iam really happy to say that u r welcoming newbies well

salasi 07-04-2011 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by repo (Post 4404477)
All off them ;-)

Nah, you only need 'man -k'. Trouble is, if that's all you know, you'll be the slowest sys admin on the planet.

jefro 07-04-2011 04:35 PM

Problem with man pages is they kind of assume you are an admin. Not an easy read in some cases.

You may wish to get some books or pay for some schools.

An administrator needs to know much more that some few hundred shell commands in some of the common shells. That would only be 5% or less of what they need to know.

markush 07-04-2011 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefro (Post 4404840)
Problem with man pages is they kind of assume you are an admin. Not an easy read in some cases.
...

But manpages have a common layout and one can search very efficient within manpages. In my opinion learning to use the manpages is as important as any other knowledge.

But I agree that manpages can't substitute a good schoolbook or tutorial.

Markus

chrism01 07-04-2011 06:08 PM

I'll go with anomie's post #7.
As for man pages, I prefer the online version here for ease of searching/reading http://linux.die.net/man/ when I can reach it.

salasi 07-05-2011 02:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jefro (Post 4404840)
Problem with man pages is they kind of assume you are an admin.

The question that the OP asked was:
Quote:

what commands i need to master with, to become system administrator
and the trouble is that you need a lot more than commands. I mean, you can find all of the commands that have something to do with networking, but that really, really won't teach you all of networking and if you don't come to the commands with some level of knowledge, you'll be lost.

(And, anyway, one disadvantage that I should have pointed out with the man command, and variants, is that they are the man pages for every command installed on the system. Here Chris's suggestion of an online version does have the advantage when it comes to other things that you might install.)

And, I've no idea which commands anyone could think that they could learn to give them the answer to '....when do I say no to the Boss...'.


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