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Old 07-28-2004, 05:42 AM   #1
Scratchit
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SUSE Yum


Hi all

I'm running SUSE 9.1. Can anyone give me a rundown on how to install programs using yum. It only seems to do upgrades. How do I install 'Foobilliards' for example, I see the files are tar or gz or some-such, how do I deal with files with these suffixes?

Can anyone give me blow by blow instructions?

Cheers
 
Old 07-28-2004, 06:49 AM   #2
Foxy
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I use SuSE Personal 9.1 but I've no idea what 'yum' is, lol!

In general, .tar.gz files are tarballs g-zipped up (like a .zip file) of source code, which need compiling/making to be useable.

Instructions for install (in general):

*Use Ark to extract the files from the tarball/gzip file to somewhere (usr/src is good AFAIK). Or, browse to the archive in Konqueror, double click it to enter the file and copy the directory inside to somewhere.

*Look in the extracted folder for 'README' or 'INSTALL' or similar. This will tell you specifically how to compile and install the program. Instructions may also be on the website (depends on the program).

Generally though, you have to open a console window (Konsole in KDE), and do:

su
(type root password, it won't appear as you type it, hit enter)
cd /wherever/you/put/the/folder/thefolderitself
./configure
make install (this handles the files and calls the compiler to compile them).

If you're lucky and there are no errors the program should be around somewhere. Usually in a /bin folder.

Hope this helps a bit.
 
Old 07-28-2004, 07:31 AM   #3
Scratchit
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Ups!! Slip of the pen!!

Sorry guys I meant Yast not yum: scratch:
 
Old 07-28-2004, 07:50 AM   #4
mykrob
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YAST can only install from RPM's, not from source. IF you're trying to install a downloaded RPM, simply click it in Konqueror, and it will open a dialog giving you the option to "Install with YAST". Click that, it will ask for your root password, and install.. Pretty easy..
 
Old 07-28-2004, 08:23 AM   #5
leadazide
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If the program is packed as a tar.gz file, most likely you will have to compile it from source. Install gcc, make,automake from yast, unpack the archive with ark to some directory (I use /usr/src/<program name>),
read README or INSTALL,
most likely you'll have to run three commands: ./configure , make , and make install (as root). Sometimes you don't need to run ./configure

launch console, cd to this directory

cd /usr/src/<program>
./configure
make
su
make install
 
Old 07-28-2004, 08:29 AM   #6
leadazide
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oops
sorry Foxy, didn't notice your post.
What I'd like to mention, in suse you've to install gcc, make, automake and the rest extra, they aren't installed by default. And in Suse 9.1 Personal gcc isn't included at all AFAIK.
 
Old 07-28-2004, 09:32 AM   #7
Scratchit
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OK guys!!

Got the hang of it. Using Yast is very simple once you've been told how!

Thanks a lot
 
Old 07-28-2004, 05:49 PM   #8
mykrob
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you can also install RPM's from command line. This is WAYYYYYYYYY faster that yast.
Go to the directory that the RPM is in. Open a terminal from that directory (pressing F4 will do this).
Type is "su" and enter your root password.
Next, type:

rpm -Uvh rpmName.rpm

this will install the rpm in record time.
I know these RPM names can get long, but you can use wild cards.. For example, ifyour file name is "really.Long.Filename-0.1-3.3748239-3.longerName.cvs.rpm", you can simply type:

rpm -Uvh reall*.rpm

and it will instally any rom file that begins with "reall".
Also, if you have a directory with several RPM's that can be dependencies for each other, you can install them all in one pass:

rpm -Uvh *.rpm

this will install ALL rom's in the directory.

A little more info: the -U means "upgrade". If there is an existing install of the rpm your are installingthat is older, it will overwrite it and upgrade. The "v" means verbose, text will detail what is happening during the install process. Finally, the "h" mean hashmarks. You will get a text-based progress indicator like "Installing: ####### 35%".

the command line install will also notify you if dependencies arent met and tell you exactly what is needed.

-myk
 
Old 07-29-2004, 01:17 PM   #9
leadazide
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Well, commandline is a good helper in most times, but IMHO installing RPMs with YaST is still faster and more comfortable (at least for such a noob like me) - just 2 clicks and ready (maybe the installing process itself takes some more time, but while installing you can do other things.) When it comes to dependencies, YaST tries to install needed additional rpms from a cd, so you don't need to install'em manually. And you're informed of failed dependencies as well.
 
Old 07-29-2004, 01:47 PM   #10
detpenguin
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Quote:
I know these RPM names can get long, but you can use wild cards.. For example, ifyour file name is "really.Long.Filename-0.1-3.3748239-3.longerName.cvs.rpm", you can simply type:

rpm -Uvh reall*.rpm
wow...THAT sure makes it easier...i've been typing all those numbers and stuff for soooo long now, and hating it. thanks!!!
 
  


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