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Old 12-31-2005, 05:01 PM   #1
megalomando
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Suse: Step one is?


Hi,

I want to leave windows and Linux is the route that seems best. I have downloaded Suse 10 and installed it. I have 3 SATA HDs two are NTFS running XP and one I formatted to FAT32. Suse partitioned the fat drive and installed a linux Ext2 partition. I have managed to get this properly connected to the internet via a DSL connection.

I access XP or Suse via the bios boot loader which if I hit Esc at startup, I select which device the boot goes to. The first bootable device is the drive with Suse. If I arrow down to the next HD, XP starts. This way I don't have to worry about a software problem with a dual boot.

That said, here's some issues I have to deal with & not in any particular order, they all are are a hassle:

I have no idea how to pretty much do anything. Command line? where does one find the command line to enter something? I assume you hit enter when your'e done entering text to set the command in action?

I see people asking questions & the answers are in a language I don't understand and I have looked for a tutorial explaining this obvious need to know but haven't found it yet. I hesatate to go to the Bookstore to select a book on Linux as there's so many different Linux versions, how would I know which book to buy. I would think it would have to be for the platform I installed. If it's written for Suse 8 is that OK with Suise 10?

I have the internet set to start at at startup and sometimes it doesn't work after I use it for awhile. Maybe the isp hiccuped and I need to reconnect. the icon Shows the connection is active but there's no connection to the internet. I try to restart it again with no luck. The only way to reconnect is to reboot and then it's auto reconnected again.

I thought Suse 10 could read NTFS but neither of my NTFS disks show up. I do see the fat32 drive under a windows folder and sniffing around with YasT I see Suse does correctly ID the NTFS drives but allows no link to them. I thought I could use them for a database for MP3 and video files. I had some files there for Linux but I can't access them from Suse.

I do not know how to install wine but thought I could run Pegasus with it. If I can't access my Pegasus folder on the NTFS, how do I use it under wine?

Why does root not allow me to open that folder, it says I am not the owner. I am the only one using the computer and did not direct ownership when I installed it. Is that where the NTFS drives are being held hostage?

Is there some GUI that allows someone who does not understand the linux protocol/langage to install programs?

I know these questions have been encountered by everyone here at some time or the other. Is there not a tutorial for non linux savy newbies to learn from? As it is, running Linux is pretty useless to me for I can't do anything more with it than I can at the library's internet computer...

Thank you
 
Old 12-31-2005, 05:10 PM   #2
KimVette
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You need to create mount points and mount the drive. In my system I have:

/windows
/windows/c
/windows/d
/windows/e
(f and g have been moved to Linux drives)

In my fstab I have:
Code:
/dev/hda1            /windows/c           ntfs       ro,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0
/dev/hdf1            /windows/d           ntfs       rw,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0
/dev/hdh1            /windows/e           ntfs       rw,users,gid=users,umask=0002,nls=utf8 0 0
To determine the device files for your partitions, check fdisk -l:

Code:
kimp4:/usr/src/linux/arch # fdisk -l

Disk /dev/hda: 27.3 GB, 27373731840 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3328 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda1   *           1        3327    26724096    7  HPFS/NTFS
{snip}
This should give you enough info to go on. If you need help beyond this please post the entire output of your fdisk -l command (you need to run it as root)
 
Old 12-31-2005, 05:32 PM   #3
saikee
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Using the BIOS to switch the disk order should stop if you know how to edit a text file in Linux. Just adding 2 to 3 lines there you can kiss the Bios switching good bye.

Post your screen information after issuing "fdisk -l" in Bash shell and cotent of /boot/grub/menu.lst here if you want the advice of these 2 ~ 3 lines.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 05:50 PM   #4
megalomando
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Thank you for the replies. They are I'm sure accurate & the answer to a few off the problems I mentioned. If you would have said the same thing in Espiranto it would have conveyed as much.

I think there's little for me in the Linux platform. I don't understand the language you're using nor can I find what to me should be an obvious thing and that is an explanation geared for someone who knows "Nothing" about Linux. NOTHING... and I can't use your information you've kindly offered.

Bash file? Sounds like something you do to a filing cabinet when you're mad.

Knowing how to edit a text file in Linux? no unless it's the same way you do it in windows. Use the proper syntax in Linux? not if you don't know it.

cotent? no clue

fstab? some medicine you take daily?

fdisk? sounds like a dos command when you want to initalize a disk for formatting? If I wasn't familliar with the old dos commands I wouldn't even have that clue.

See... That's the problem. If you're new & someone talks what's gibberish to you, you can't use it.

What do I need to do to learn how to use Suse 10 linux? None of the forum sites I have found have this kind of ovbvious basic instruction on them.

This is more than frustrating...

Thank you
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:11 PM   #5
stress_junkie
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The previous two posters apparently didn't read the part of your post you said that you don't know how to start a command line or what to enter on the command line. I'll start a little bit closer to the beginning of learning about Linux.

You say that you have installed SuSE. Okay. When you installed the system you were asked for the password for the root account, and you were asked to enter the name and password for a normal user account. You will use the normal user account 99.99% of the time.

The normal installation for SuSE uses a graphic package called KDE. You probably see a graphical login screen when the system starts. This screen looks a lot like the login screen for a Microsoft operating system. Log in to your normal user account.

Once KDE is logged on and has finished "setting up your session" then you will see that the screen is a lot like a Microsoft operating system desktop. It also works a lot like a Microsoft desktop. The bar along the bottom is a task bar. It shows what is running. It also has icons to start some applications. The left part of the task bar is a start button. If you click on the button it will raise a menu of applications. And lastly, most of the screen looks just like a Microsoft desktop. There may be icons positioned around the desktop. They are just like Microsoft icons on the desktop. They start an application. So far you should feel pretty much at home if you are already familiar with Microsoft operating systems.

Now click on the start button at the bottom left of the screen on the task bar. Click on the following sequence. System | Terminal | Konsole

You should see a window open. The window is mostly empty except for a cursor at the top right of the window. This looks a lot like a command line window in Microsoft operating systems. In fact it is like that only much more fun.

Now enter the command suggested by the first poster. Just enter these letters and press the <Enter> key.

/sbin/fdisk -l

You've just entered your first command. The fdisk command showed you your hard disks with their partitions. Here is what my system looks like with fdisk -l:

$ /sbin/fdisk -l

Disk /dev/hda: 81.9 GB, 81964302336 bytes
16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 158816 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 18725 9437368+ 83 Linux
/dev/hda2 18726 20806 1048824 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/hda3 20807 158816 69557040 83 Linux

Disk /dev/hdb: 81.9 GB, 81964302336 bytes
16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 158816 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hdb1 * 1 24975 12586896 83 Linux
/dev/hdb2 24975 27046 1044225 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/hdb3 27047 158816 66412080 83 Linux

One of the posters asked you to enter the result of running this command on your system. You do this exactly the same way that you do it on Microsoft operating systems. Use your mouse to highlight the output of the fdisk command. Then click on the "Edit" on the toolbar at the top of the window. Then click on "Copy". Then come back to your web browser and click on the Quick Reply window in this web page. When you see the cursor in the window then go to the "Edit" in the toolbar of your browser. Click on "Paste". You should see the stuff that you highlighted in the command window copy into the Quick Reply window on this web page.

Okay so that's step one. You have already learned a lot. You have learned that the KDE graphic environment in Linux is a lot like the graphic environment in Microsoft. You do many of the same things in the same way. A lot of the things that you already know about Microsoft will work in KDE on Linux. Hopefully you will feel better about Linux already.

Lastly you can close the command line window in two ways. The first way is just like on Microsoft. You can click on the [X] button at the top right of the window border. Or you can click on any part of the window to bring the window into focus, then press the control button and the d button at the same time. This is the Linux way to log out of a session.

Now you already know enough to start playing with the applications. If you want to play with the command line then you can learn a lot from reading these forum questions. You will probably have more fun if you stick to the graphical applications for a while. There are a lot of them included with SuSE. You can see various things about your computer in the Start Button | System menu. There are a lot of good office applications in the Start Button | Office menu. Just play with that for a while. I hope this gets you over the hump and you start to have some fun. You can learn to be a system administrator after you fall in love with Linux.

Last edited by stress_junkie; 12-31-2005 at 06:53 PM.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:13 PM   #6
saikee
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Thank you for convincing me that I am wasting my time on this thread.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:31 PM   #7
megalomando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saikee
Thank you for convincing me that I am wasting my time on this thread.
You're welcome.

But thank you for trying.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:36 PM   #8
megalomando
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Stress Junkie,

Thanks so much for what I needed to know to get started. The task bar was on the topso I relocated it to the bottom. I went to the Konsole and entered the command but it didn't work. This is what I ended up with.

fiddle@linux:~> /sbin/fdisk -l
fiddle@linux:~>

So no action was performed. Still, I will re-read what you've suggested. Thanks for getting me started on the right track.

If I still can't get things to display I'll come back & ask but I'll see what I can find on my own.

FWIW, The first 5-6 times I tried logging on I had to enter my password to get to the desktop. Now it does not ask me anymore.

Not sure what that means.

Last edited by megalomando; 12-31-2005 at 06:37 PM.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:37 PM   #9
stress_junkie
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saikee, are you talking to me or megalomando? I would respond the same either way. This is the newbie forum. It isn't helpful if your posts require a lot of foreknowledge in order to understand them. megalomando said that he didn't understand what a command line is, much less how to enter commands.

I like helping newbies. That's why I looked at this thread. I'm delighted when I can show someone that they already know more than they thought because their experience in Microsoft is applicable in KDE. I've spent twenty years helping people learn about computers one keystroke at a time. I get a thrill out of helping people get started. If you don't then just don't respond to these kinds of requests for help. Your response about wasting your time is not very nice.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:43 PM   #10
stress_junkie
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megalomando,

You may need to use the root account for some command line commands. You don't need to log out of your normal user account. You can just click on Start Button | System | Terminal | Terminal in Super User Mode. This will open a command line window and ask you for the root account password. When you enter the password then that window will be running as root but the rest of your window session is still your normal user account.

Have fun.

Last edited by stress_junkie; 12-31-2005 at 06:45 PM.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:51 PM   #11
megalomando
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Thanks, I did that. I wonder if the reason it didn't run in konsole is in some way related to my not have to log in to Suse anymore? Maybe the system has defaulted to a more restrictive state that does not require a password but at the same time restricts what can be freely done?

Here's the result of the super terminal query

linux:~ # /sbin/fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 250.0 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 2 10133 81385290 c W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda2 10134 10264 1052257+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda3 10265 30401 161750452+ 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdb: 251.0 GB, 251000193024 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30515 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 * 1 30515 245111706 7 HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sdc: 251.0 GB, 251000193024 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30515 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 2 30515 245103705 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sdc5 2 30515 245103673+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
linux:~ #
 
Old 12-31-2005, 06:52 PM   #12
saikee
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stress_junkie,

My reply is to the poster.

I have been careful to suggest if the guy want to stop Bios switching all he has to do is to edit 3 lines. I asked to see the essential information because I knew if I write it out now he wouldn't know how to use it.

I can only help people who are prepared to help themselves.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 07:06 PM   #13
megalomando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saikee
stress_junkie,

My reply is to the poster.

I have been careful to suggest if the guy want to stop Bios switching all he has to do is to edit 3 lines. I asked to see the essential information because I knew if I write it out now he wouldn't know how to use it.

I can only help people who are prepared to help themselves.
FWIW, I elected to do my start-up this way as I did not want to disrupt or potentially disrupt my XP settings and get a NTLDR not found message. It's just as easy to use the bios switch as it is to select from a different on screen option. By default when I start up the computer it automatically goes into Suse. If I hit Esc during the start-up I get the option to select a drive and I can select the XP drive. If I stick with Linux I never have to hit the Esc again. If I want to default to XP on start I can make that switch in bios. It's as easy as anything else and I haven't added anything to any start-up routine.

Now something personal to you:

I have the feeling you're not an easy person to work with. I am a Doctor and deal with people every day who do not understand what I have been doing for years. I do my very most not to talk down to them but try to find where their level is & help them reach the understanding I have. After that is done everyone understands and there was no attitude involved.

Just a guess on my part but when someday you become a little more humble and loose your brashness, you will be a much happier person in life.

Cheers
 
Old 12-31-2005, 07:20 PM   #14
saikee
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I happen to be a doctor too.

I boot 100+ systems in a box without any BIOS switching and don't understand the big deal of dealing with only two. I run 3 Dos, 3 Windows (including XP in the 3rd disk), 2 BSD and 97 Linux (including Suse 9.1, 10.0, and 10.1). I can boot any system from selcting from the screen and I thought you would like to move up too, hence I enter this thread.

If you don't like my advice I just take elsewhere. You would do the same. Both are happy this way.

Anyway I have put in the link showing how 100+ systems are controlled by one Grub. This Grub can come from your Suse.
------------------------
To make my departure as a constructive one let me state that the reason why you can stop Bios switching is because the Suse's bootloader Grub has a "map" command to re-map the disk order "on-the-fly" or by software to save you from messing around the the BIOS.

I also take the opportunity to apologise if having created any misunderstanding.

Last edited by saikee; 12-31-2005 at 07:39 PM.
 
Old 12-31-2005, 07:38 PM   #15
megalomando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saikee
I am a doctor too.

I boot 100+ systems in a box without any BIOS switching and don't understand the big deal of dealing with only two. I run 3 Dos, 3 Windows (including XP), 2 BSD and 97 Linux (including Suse 9.1, 10, and 10.1). I can boot any system from selcting from the screen and I thought you would like to move up too, hence I enter this thread.

If you don't like my advice I just take elsewhere. You would do the same. Both are happy this way.

Anyway I have put in the link showing how 100+ systems are controlled by one Grub. This Grub can come from your Suse.
If you are a doctor then you need to change your profile, you were an engineer before.

I only want to run one system. If I get away from windows 100%, Perfect. If not I only need to have two systems, not 100.

My starting the thread here was not related to bios switching, that was your take on my post. My queery related to my not knowing about the command line, how to use it and not being able to have Suse recgonize my hard drives.
 
  


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