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Old 01-12-2004, 08:30 AM   #1
lemuel
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suggestions on a good book that is not too technical nor too brainless


I'm planning on buying an introductory book on linux.
can anyone suggest what i should buy and what i shouldn't buy?

I'm a 5th year computer engineering student who knows (and loves) programming on assembly language, C & C++, and most of all Java.

my only experience on operating systems other than windows is that i've successfuly installed a RH9 on my PC with an empty Hard disk, but failed to get all my devices (like handheld, scanner, winmodem) up and running. Oh, and i also tried installing FreeBSD but it was too complicated for me and wasn't able to setup the GUI part correctly

I got this awfully bad thing about buying books. I tend to buy the one with the most attractive cover. I've done this a lot of times, and to my great dissappointment, the books would always turn out to either be too technical for me, or too brainless.

Is there any book out there that's suited for my level of experience? I need something that could teach me the basics. my goal is to be able to program in linux and to use it as an ordinary desktop system. I'm not that interested on the networking side. It would also be cool to be able to learn how to tweak the OS (if that's not too hard that is).
 
Old 01-12-2004, 08:45 AM   #2
Seventh
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I'm new as well, and have been pouring over this one:

http://www.bitworm.com/detail/067232...Unleashed.html

Highly recommend it.
 
Old 01-13-2004, 12:20 AM   #3
lemuel
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thanks, seventh. It looks promising.
 
Old 01-13-2004, 12:37 AM   #4
rberry88
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I see you are using Red Hat, in that case, I would recommend picking up either "Red Hat Linux 9 Bible" and/or "Red Hat Linux 9 Unleashed". Both a very good books that cover everything and is explained in an easy to follow sense.

Two other non-distro specific books that I have found invaluable are "Linux in a Nutshell" and "Running Linux", both on their 4th editions and are superb.

rberry88
 
Old 01-13-2004, 07:56 AM   #5
ScooterB
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I would concur with rberry88 on the choice of books. I would also add that any choice of books by O'Reilly Press would be good. You might also check and see if your local Barnes and Noble has any of the Red Hat Press series. Redhat has now come out with their own manuals and from glancing over the first one (the first one that I've got anyway) it looks very informative (and it has a cool cover too!). I hope that helps! Good luck and enjoy Linux!
 
Old 01-13-2004, 08:33 AM   #6
sick-o-windoze
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I'll second that. I've always had good luck with O'Reilly and Wrox books and been disappointed with others, so I always check them out first. Don't much care for the "whatever for dummies" books. Too cutesie. I would also suggest a beginner guide to Unix, because Linux books tend to assume that you already have that background.
 
Old 01-13-2004, 10:46 AM   #7
lemuel
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Quote:
Originally posted by ScooterB
Good luck and enjoy Linux!
I'm sure I will. My classmates and teachers have been telling me how cool linux is. I can say that they did a good job of persuading me to try it. Now I'm so excited to get started!

Thanks for the suggestions guys. I'll try to look for those books mentioned. Maybe I will also try o'reilly books first cause I have had good experiences with them too.

Hey I just found this book at Amazon called "Moving to Linux: Kiss the blue Screen of Death Goodbye! by Marcel Gagne" pretty catchy name huh? what do you guys think? Is it any good?
 
Old 01-15-2004, 09:47 AM   #8
sick-o-windoze
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It has good reviews and has been recommended by someone else on this board. I've pretty much figured out what I need to do to get Linux going, so I bought Alton Brown's "I'm Just Here for the Food" instead. Used the roast chicken technique... delicious!
 
Old 01-15-2004, 05:49 PM   #9
ScooterB
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Well, the books I mentioned before just saved my ass. My email server was hacked (because I didn't follow all the recommendations in those books to close all bu the necessary ports and use the firewalls). With a little help from a friend and all my books I got us back up and running in less than 24 hours. I have also found that I really enjoy working with Linux. It has caused me to learn so much more about computers, networking, etc. And for that I'm thankful!!!
 
Old 01-15-2004, 10:53 PM   #10
gdivens51
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i bought 38 Linux books off Ebay b4 i found this excellent site to buy books. Would have saved me alot of money & some of the Used books advertised as in good shape were brand new.

http://www.alibris.com/

here's another good source

http://www.fetchbook.info/
 
Old 01-15-2004, 11:44 PM   #11
Velvet Elvis
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I've gotta chime in with support for O'Reilly as well. Their _Running_Linux_ is the only Linux book I've ever purchased. Other than that I've gotten by fine with man pages and HOWTO's.

You should also check the free Rute guide at : http://www.icon.co.za/~psheer/book/index.html

If you're enough of a masochist to git a kick out of programing in assembly, you'll love traditional UNIX manuals. You probobly don't need to spend much money on books. There are tons of great free resources out there, they just aren't written in what most people would consider English. Check out the Linux Documentation Project at www.tldp.org
 
Old 01-15-2004, 11:52 PM   #12
Velvet Elvis
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Somthing else:

For your purposes, you should really try Slackware. It doesn't do much of anything automaticly, so you have to learn a lot on the fly while setting it up. It's also the most UNIX like of the distros, so if you ever want to work with a UNIX machine, the transition will be pretty easy. The Slackware forum on sight is great for getting help when you're first starting with it. If you want to use linux, stick with redhat. If you want to learn linux, (as I assume you do, since you're training to be a computer professional) use Slackware or Debian.

Slackware is the most "pure" distro out there in that almost no modifications have been made to the default componets by the distrobution maintainer. Other than the rc.d init scripts, most anything you learn using Slackware will carry over to other linux and unix systems. Redhat, on the other hand, is so non standard that upon learning it, you'll have to do some readjusting if you try to use anything other than Redhat.
 
Old 01-16-2004, 06:02 AM   #13
lemuel
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Thanks for the info, Velvet Elvis. I've never heard about slackware before. I'll go try that out. I'm willing to try anything that can boost up my learning experience.

great site, gdivens51! I've never seen such cheap books in my entire life!
 
  


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