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Old 10-03-2010, 10:49 AM   #1
L-p-BTM
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Sudoers file gone?


I logged in as root and was trying to add a user to sudoers, but then when I tried to save it said that the file was write protected and couldn't be saved. However, when I returned to look at the contents of the sudoers file, they were all done. The file is now empty.

1- How can I restore the contents of the default sudoers file. (I have FC12)
2- How can I add a user (no password) to the sudoers list without this happening again?

Thanks in advance!
 
Old 10-03-2010, 10:54 AM   #2
sohail0399
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try visudo to edit the file
 
Old 10-03-2010, 10:57 AM   #3
L-p-BTM
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ok I will. I would be grateful if someone can supply me with the default contents of the file so I can put them back.
 
Old 10-03-2010, 11:01 AM   #4
sohail0399
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here is the defult seeting , i newly installed fedora 13 so that i just copy and past but you check it:


===================================================================================================
## Sudoers allows particular users to run various commands as
## the root user, without needing the root password.
##
## Examples are provided at the bottom of the file for collections
## of related commands, which can then be delegated out to particular
## users or groups.
##
## This file must be edited with the 'visudo' command.

## Host Aliases
## Groups of machines. You may prefer to use hostnames (perhaps using
## wildcards for entire domains) or IP addresses instead.
# Host_Alias FILESERVERS = fs1, fs2
# Host_Alias MAILSERVERS = smtp, smtp2

## User Aliases
## These aren't often necessary, as you can use regular groups
## (ie, from files, LDAP, NIS, etc) in this file - just use %groupname
## rather than USERALIAS
# User_Alias ADMINS = jsmith, mikem


## Command Aliases
## These are groups of related commands...

## Networking
# Cmnd_Alias NETWORKING = /sbin/route, /sbin/ifconfig, /bin/ping, /sbin/dhclient, /usr/bin/net, /sbin/iptables, /usr/bin/rfcomm, /usr/bin/wvdial, /sbin/iwconfig, /sbin/mii-tool

## Installation and management of software
# Cmnd_Alias SOFTWARE = /bin/rpm, /usr/bin/up2date, /usr/bin/yum

## Services
# Cmnd_Alias SERVICES = /sbin/service, /sbin/chkconfig

## Updating the locate database
# Cmnd_Alias LOCATE = /usr/bin/updatedb

## Storage
# Cmnd_Alias STORAGE = /sbin/fdisk, /sbin/sfdisk, /sbin/parted, /sbin/partprobe, /bin/mount, /bin/umount

## Delegating permissions
# Cmnd_Alias DELEGATING = /usr/sbin/visudo, /bin/chown, /bin/chmod, /bin/chgrp

## Processes
# Cmnd_Alias PROCESSES = /bin/nice, /bin/kill, /usr/bin/kill, /usr/bin/killall

## Drivers
# Cmnd_Alias DRIVERS = /sbin/modprobe

# Defaults specification

#
# Disable "ssh hostname sudo <cmd>", because it will show the password in clear.
# You have to run "ssh -t hostname sudo <cmd>".
#
Defaults requiretty

Defaults env_reset
Defaults env_keep = "COLORS DISPLAY HOSTNAME HISTSIZE INPUTRC KDEDIR LS_COLORS"
Defaults env_keep += "MAIL PS1 PS2 QTDIR USERNAME LANG LC_ADDRESS LC_CTYPE"
Defaults env_keep += "LC_COLLATE LC_IDENTIFICATION LC_MEASUREMENT LC_MESSAGES"
Defaults env_keep += "LC_MONETARY LC_NAME LC_NUMERIC LC_PAPER LC_TELEPHONE"
Defaults env_keep += "LC_TIME LC_ALL LANGUAGE LINGUAS _XKB_CHARSET XAUTHORITY"

Defaults secure_path = /sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin

## Next comes the main part: which users can run what software on
## which machines (the sudoers file can be shared between multiple
## systems).
## Syntax:
##
## user MACHINE=COMMANDS
##
## The COMMANDS section may have other options added to it.
##
## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root ALL=(ALL) ALL

## Allows members of the 'sys' group to run networking, software,
## service management apps and more.
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
# %wheel ALL=(ALL) ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

## Allows members of the users group to mount and unmount the
## cdrom as root
# %users ALL=/sbin/mount /mnt/cdrom, /sbin/umount /mnt/cdrom

## Allows members of the users group to shutdown this system
# %users localhost=/sbin/shutdown -h now

## Read drop-in files from /etc/sudoers.d (the # here does not mean a comment)
#includedir /etc/sudoers.d
 
Old 02-02-2012, 12:08 PM   #5
jpearl24
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Thanks for this. I totally forked mine hah.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 12:41 PM   #6
Mr. Alex
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In order to edit sudoers safe - you can use any editor but be logged in as root via "su" and add a "return" char to the end of the file. I use medit for /etc/sudoers - works fine every time.
 
Old 02-02-2012, 12:58 PM   #7
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Alex View Post
In order to edit sudoers safe - you can use any editor
In order to edit sudoers safe it is suggested to use 'visudo': "visudo edits the sudoers file in a safe fashion, analogous to vipw(8). visudo locks the sudoers file against multiple simultaneous edits, provides basic sanity checks, and checks for parse errors.".

If you don't want to then at least run 'visudo -c' afterwards.
 
  


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