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Old 09-16-2011, 02:57 PM   #16
T3RM1NVT0R
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juc1 View Post
Can I please clarify this - I use putty on my home laptop to connect to my VPS in another country so I guess that would be remote access.
Yes, that is remote access.

Quote:
But I can also log in to the VPS via Parallels Plesk Panel which has its own SSH client. So is that still remote access, or I mean is there any real difference between these two types of SSH login?

Thanks
This is also remote access from what I can read from their site.

Local Access: When you access a machine from within the network it is consider as local access. It doesn't matter even if you VPN. When you VPN you are in local network so that is local access. I am defining local access in terms of network not in terms of geography.

Remote Access: When you access a machine from outside your network it is consider as remote access.

This is my understanding of local and remote access.

Last edited by T3RM1NVT0R; 09-16-2011 at 02:58 PM.
 
Old 09-18-2011, 08:31 PM   #17
chrism01
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In security terms, specifically sshd_config, remote means anyone using an ssh client on another machine.
Strictly speaking, 'local' means you are already logged into the machine and just want to change users via su or sudo.
IOW, local vs remote is defined relative to the machine itself, not the network its on, even if it is a 'LAN'.
 
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Old 09-19-2011, 02:42 PM   #18
T3RM1NVT0R
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@ Reply

Hi Chrism,

Yes, you are right. I was thinking in terms on network.
 
  


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