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Old 07-30-2010, 06:45 AM   #16
sumeet inani
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Quote:
Gotta love the apt-get command, too!! It doesn't get any easier than that- trouble is, how does one know which programs/apps are available vie apt-get?
Everyone told you something
i usually do
Code:
sudo apt-get update if you want to get latest list from repository
dpkg-query -W > ~/Desktop/installed-on-my-computer.txt;apt-cache pkgnames > ~/Desktop/available-softwares.txt
Thus I have list of softwares available via repository and another file listing what I have installed on my desktop.
 
Old 07-30-2010, 08:27 AM   #17
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
Common misconception # 439: A .tar.gz archive does not always contain source code----it is simply a way of efficiently packaging files.
I don't think that.

Anyway, for the OP, tar.(gz|bz2) is like the Unix equivalent of .zip files. Except that unlike zip, the compression and archiving are separate. TAR is *just* and archiving format, it doesn't compress, and gzip, bz2, etc. are *just* compression formats, they don't archive many files into one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by b0uncer View Post
By the way, Ubuntu (among some others) has implemented a way to get package names by typing in a command they provide, which may or may not be useful. For example if you'd like to run 'fancy-command', but it is not installed, typing
Code:
fancy-command
at terminal usually just tells you "command not found". On Ubuntu, if it finds the package which provides that executable, it in addition tells you the package name (and if I remember this right, the apt-get command to install it as well) that you'll get it from.
That's really cool! I always thought it just prints "apt-get install fancy-command", and doesn't actually search the repositories.
 
Old 07-30-2010, 11:40 AM   #18
Sumguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cybercastaway View Post
That's what the messenger handles in the profiles are for.
I had to read that a few times- I was almost taking it seriously! LOL.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cybercastaway View Post
It is also good to get Avast anti-virus and anti-spyware for Linux. It is free for home use:

http://www.avast.com/linux-home-edition
Appreciate the advice....but I didn't use antivirus in windows...I'm darn sure not going to use it in LINUX! (I always research unknown stuff first...and the types of things that interest me are not likely to be the province of hackers....) [11 years of Windows use without a virus- not that I knew what I was doing...I just don't mess with games or porno]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadow_7 View Post
Using your package management system for your distro is almost always the preferred way. Especially for newbies. How to use it should be well documented in your distro and probably on your distros website and user forums as well.

Baring that however.

.gz is a file archive format
$ man gunzip
$ man gzip

.bz2 is a file archive format
$ man bunzip2
$ man bzip2

.tar is a file archive format
$ man tar

.tar.gz is the combination of two archive formats. tar can normally handle both formats for you.
$ tar -xzvpf <file>.tar.gz

.tar.bz2 is the combination of two archive formats. tar can normally handle both formats for you.
$ tar -xjvpf <file>.tar.bz2

.tgz is shorthand for .tar.gz and other quirks depending on what, where, and when.

What you do with it after that is normally contained in the archive. Probably a README or INSTALL or other file that you can open in a simple text editor. A lot of times it's sources that need to be compiled and installed. But not always. And it can be a real headache if you don't have a development system installed yet, or know what you're doing. You can sometimes use your distros package management system to bundle it up from sources into a distro package. But that can be harder to do (or do right) than just compiling from source.

.deb is a file archive format specific to a package management system. You can install such a thing on a debian system with fairly simple commands.
# dpkg -i <package>.deb

But, if there's unmet deps and other things it can be more trouble than it's worth. And various others compiled against version X of something with compiler that differs from yours. And this is why you want to use your package management system. It has some built in layers of protection to keep you from shooting yourself in the foot. Not to imply bullet proof.

And then there's patches, repositories, and other joys of layering an LFS system over an existing system / distro. LFS being the short form of linux from scratch. Which might be worth reading about if you're truly curious about what happens under the hood. And otherwise don't have anything productive to do with your life.
Yes, the package management in Ubuntu is simple as pie, and once I made the conscious effort to search there for what I needed (Old Windows habits die hard) I was in heaven.

Gotta love the "man" command!

Guess I will take a look at compiling to see what's involved (Not that I'll ever need it...but I like to be prepared just in case....)

Last edited by Sumguy; 07-30-2010 at 11:55 AM.
 
Old 07-30-2010, 11:51 AM   #19
Sumguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sumeet inani View Post
Everyone told you something
i usually do
Code:
sudo apt-get update if you want to get latest list from repository
dpkg-query -W > ~/Desktop/installed-on-my-computer.txt;apt-cache pkgnames > ~/Desktop/available-softwares.txt
Thus I have list of softwares available via repository and another file listing what I have installed on my desktop.
Excellent!


Quote:
Originally Posted by MTK358 View Post
I don't think that.

Anyway, for the OP, tar.(gz|bz2) is like the Unix equivalent of .zip files. Except that unlike zip, the compression and archiving are separate. TAR is *just* and archiving format, it doesn't compress, and gzip, bz2, etc. are *just* compression formats, they don't archive many files into one.
.
Ah! Now I get it. Very helpful.
 
Old 07-30-2010, 07:32 PM   #20
Shadow_7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumguy View Post
Guess I will take a look at compiling to see what's involved (Not that I'll ever need it...but I like to be prepared just in case....)
Trust me, you'll need it. Maybe not right off. But you'll find some software you simply can't live without and have to compile it from source to get it, because your distro doesn't yet package it. Or you have some special hardware that needs custom drivers, not packaged in your distro. Or you're doing something fancy in the realm of audio and your distro's package is not configured the way you want and otherwise need it to be configured. But that's why your distro has a source archive as well as a package archive. And other can't get there from here without taking that plunge. But for most uses, email and web browsing, not needed.
 
  


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