LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 06-12-2008, 10:51 AM   #1
LinuxLiker
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Florida
Distribution: Ubuntu, Vector Linux, Mandriva
Posts: 70

Rep: Reputation: 15
Question Still unable to connect to internet using Comcast Cable and Mandriva


Hi, I posted this problem about a month ago and tried the suggestions offered but have had no luck.
I had internet service for Mandriva via Embarq DSL but have moved to location that only has Comcast.
I'm using a Dell Optiplex 270 PC with an Intel Pro Gigabit network card. I've tried connecting to Comcast via a router and directly but in either case I've had no success. The router I'm using is a Linksys Model BEFSR41 v.2.

What I'm trying to do seems simple enough. I've been going to the "configure your computer" menu item, deleting my network connection and setting up a new one. When setting a new connection, I've chosen the "automatic" option letting the computer pick a DHCP address, etc... and I've chosen the "static" option, inputting my own IP address info (I think I've found the right IP address for my computer). In either case I've not been able to reach the internet, although when I choose the "static" option and input my own IP address, the computer says the network connection is operating (and the little "connection icon" at the bottom of the screen shows a connected symbol), but I still can't reach any internet destinations through my browser (Firefox).

I'd appreciate any ideas anyone has -- my wife is looking at the situation practically and says "maybe we should put Windows on that compter if we can't get to the internet with Linux." If I can't get Linux to work with Comcast, I'll probably have to do what she says.

Thanks for any help, Gil
 
Old 06-12-2008, 11:12 AM   #2
lord-fu
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Ohio
Distribution: Slackware && freeBSD
Posts: 676

Rep: Reputation: 30
Does your router gather a WAN IP from the modem?
 
Old 06-12-2008, 03:36 PM   #3
ssarasin
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: South Bend, Indiana
Distribution: Kubuntu 8.04 64bit, 32bit & PPC
Posts: 30

Rep: Reputation: 15
Setting up an IP for your computer is only part of the procedure. You will also need to configure your gateway and DNS settings. Chances are, your router will have an address such as 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 (check your documentation)

You will need to give your PC an IP address in the proper range (192.168.0.xxx or 192.168.1.xxx) if not already configured properly. You will then need to add your gateway and DNS to your Linux network configuration as well... (the IP address of your router)

Chances are, what is happening is that your computer can "see" the network, but is having problems resolving web addresses. Without being able to resolve, it will just sit there and not really go anywhere...

I have successfully set up Linux machines using Comcast before. Granted, it was using SuSE or Ubuntu, but I can't see that Mandriva should be much different.

You might also need to check the settings on your broadband modem. It may need to be set to bridge mode if you are using your router to control access to the internet. The router and modem may be fighting each other. I have run into this setting up some networks for DSL, but I haven't had as much experience with cable modems and am unsure as to weather they operate the same way as DSL modems do. (ie: needing to be set to bridge mode)
 
Old 06-12-2008, 03:58 PM   #4
LinuxLiker
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Florida
Distribution: Ubuntu, Vector Linux, Mandriva
Posts: 70

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks for the replies. I need to ask a couple of more questons.

"Setting up an IP for your computer is only part of the procedure. You will also need to configure your gateway and DNS settings."

Do you mean gateway and DNS settings for the router or computer? Also, it's slightly embarrasing to admit but I don't really know what the terms gateway and DNS mean. (Just used to the world of plug and play and not learning about the details).

Thanks.
 
Old 06-12-2008, 04:02 PM   #5
farslayer
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Willoughby, Ohio
Distribution: linuxdebian
Posts: 7,232
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 190Reputation: 190
I actually had to call my cable provider and go through a manual setup process where they registered the Modems Serial Number and MAC address into their system before I could get internet access.. typically that procedure is done with their "internet setup wizard" that comes on a CD with the internet package, but of course that only runs on Windows...

They had also insisted their tech come out to do the install.. Wife was home so I left my Linux PC unlocked and told her to let him 'have at it' since I would be at work. Of course when I got home after work it wasn't done, the tech gave up before he even started since it was not Windows.. heh i still don't knwo why HE didn't call in and do the manual modem registration for me..
 
Old 06-12-2008, 04:10 PM   #6
ssarasin
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: South Bend, Indiana
Distribution: Kubuntu 8.04 64bit, 32bit & PPC
Posts: 30

Rep: Reputation: 15
The way it works is that your computer can have it's own IP address. (such as a street address for your house...)

The network will have a range of addresses. (such as different addresses on each house in your neighborhood...)

Each PC will have it's own unique network address, as will your router. You can think of the router as the middle hub of a wagon wheel with spokes going out to each PC. Each PC will go through the router to get to the outside world. The router is the "gateway" to the internet.

Now, if you use DHCP, the router will give out addresses to your computers on the network automatically. It will configure your network settings to point to itself as your gateway and DNS (Domain Name Server). (Think of a DNS as a phone book with the number for all of the web sites out on the internet.) And things are usually pretty much good to go.

However, if you manually set network addresses, you will need to configure your network settings on your computer manually to point to your router as the gateway and the name server. Otherwise, your computer will be requesting information, but won't know where to go to send/receive from the outside world.

Usually, the router address will be in the private range. Something like 192.168.1.1

So, you will set up your computer with an IP address such as 192.168.1.10, configure your gateway as 192.168.1.1, and the DNS as 192.168.1.1 as well.

I usually will check the logs on my router to see what DNS settings my ISP dishes out, and I will add a couple of those DNS entries as secondary or tertiary DNS entries on my PC's network settings. (Just in case the router has issues resolving...)

I would try using DHCP first and see if that fixes your problems. If so, it is most likely only a matter of filling in the blanks with the proper numbers if you go manual. If the DHCP doesn't fix it, there may be other problems such as the router and modem "fighting", or maybe a bad NIC or network cable.

The DHCP is the easiest thing to test first...
 
Old 06-12-2008, 04:11 PM   #7
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
It is normally frowned on to start a new thread rather than simply continue the exisiting one. But let's just stay with this one.

With a router (good thing to have), you have to setup two different things:

1. Setup the router to use the internet connection settings provided by your ISP--almost certainly DHCP.

2. Setup the router (and computer) for connection on the local network. Here also, DHCP is a common choice.

To configure the router, start by setting your computer for dhcp (almost certainly the router default), and accessing the router using 192.168.1.1 in a browser. This should give you the router configuration page. The router manual will give you all the instructions for this.

When you have a router, there should be no issues with the Comcast internet connection---the cable modem sees only a generic router, and never knows that Linux is on the other side. If, for example, Comcast tech support tried to say that Linux was the problem, politely explain that--with a router--that cannot be the issue.

Finally, if you have any trouble getting to the router configuration page, simply try with another computer.

Finally, finally: Take the time to learn how all this works. It would be really counterproductive to simply switch to Windows to solve the issue. What if you have problems in Windows also.
 
Old 06-12-2008, 04:14 PM   #8
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
You normally don't need to be concerned about a Gateway. Also, DHCP will often do the DNS settings automatically. Your router setup and/or computer setup menus may show this as an option.

DNS=Domain Name Server This is the mechanism used to find IPs from domain names.

Gateway? Not sure--never had to deal with one.
 
Old 06-12-2008, 04:21 PM   #9
LinuxLiker
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: Florida
Distribution: Ubuntu, Vector Linux, Mandriva
Posts: 70

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks for the latest answers

"It is normally frowned on to start a new thread rather than simply continue the exisiting one. But let's just stay with this one."
I'm sorry, I don't get onto forums very often, so I don't know the etiquette -- I thought since the thread was old, no one would want to check it anymore, now I know better.

"Finally, finally: Take the time to learn how all this works. It would be really counterproductive to simply switch to Windows to solve the issue. What if you have problems in Windows also."

You're right. I have to use Apple Macintosh on my job -- I work as a video editor. I have to use a PC to communicate with other people in our organization. I'd love to spend time learning Linux, as well as how to operate Windows and the Mac OS better, but as it is, I just get by with all of them. Linux provides my best chance at actually learining something about an OS because there's a big community of users who share information. I'll try to squeeze in some time to become more versed but that will probably mostly involve a lot of asking questions at the Linux forum when I run into trouble.

Thanks.
 
Old 06-12-2008, 08:06 PM   #10
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
Quote:
I'll try to squeeze in some time to become more versed but that will probably mostly involve a lot of asking questions at the Linux forum when I run into trouble.
We'll be here...
 
Old 06-12-2008, 11:23 PM   #11
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,549
Blog Entries: 23

Rep: Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943
Hi,

When I setup a computer locally I will setup a static IP first. I do as root from cli;

Code:
~#ifconfig -a                      #get recognized devices
~#ifconfig eth0 192.168.0.10       #set to a available IP
~#route add default gw 192.168.0.1 #set to your gateway
~#route -n                         #show the route table
~#ifconfig eth0 up                 #should be up already
~#ping 192.168.0.1                 #ping your gateway
~#ping 208.69.32.130               #google.com IP
~#ping google.com                  #test DNS, if fail then
                                   #check /etc/resolv.conf
Be sure to use IPs that are in your subnet.
You should have your '/etc/resolv.conf' setup with your 'ISP DNS' nameservers.

Code:
verizon third level dns;
4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2
4.2.2.3
4.2.2.4
You could include the above in your '/etc/resolv.conf' file. I do place after my ISP assignments. I've also placed before the ISP assignments too see if there is a difference.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Comcast Cable Internet Question verdeboy2k General 7 05-20-2006 06:02 PM
Mandriva 2005 LE and Comcast Cable connection Projectpat21 Linux - Networking 2 11-20-2005 02:32 PM
Mandriva 2005 LE and Comcast Cable connection Projectpat21 Linux - Newbie 1 10-17-2005 03:57 AM
comcast -unable to connect dareino Linux - Networking 4 07-28-2005 12:53 PM
does comcast cable internet work on linux keeknspin Linux - Newbie 2 12-31-2003 06:22 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:53 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration