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Old 02-17-2011, 06:54 AM   #1
koonaone
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Steps for learning linux : references?


Hi folks

As a strategy for learning linux I have decided to adopt using a lean windows based approach. I want to focus on command line machine system, network basics, and file management knowledge. In other words find out how desktop manager does it's business, so I know how to master my machine, but by and large once I have made my choices, leave it alone to do just that.

I figure I should know how applications are internally configured etc., but I also figure an apps GUI and config choices should take care of installations, and program usage as in M$ windows. Surely taking care of an applications dependencies are the responsibility of the developer, are they not?

I am working my way through "Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition (Version 1.0.0)" right now for an overall viewpoint. Can anyone suggest a specific source for a point by point explanation of the command basis of a generalised "desktop management" application (KDE,LXDE)? Better yet would be if it had some parallel comparison of the varied approaches taken by different distributions of linux.

A secondary question, is that allowed? Up to a certain point in Ms windows, a thorough knowledge of DOS 6.xx would theoreticaly enable one to more or less duplicate the actions of the windows overlay. Is there a basic distribution (or subset in all of them maybe?) of linux that would be consistent with that paradigm? What would be analogous to DOS batch files, or GM-Basic? Oh! that's 3.

I am certainly appreciating the depth of this forum, and the breadth of knowledge among you forumite's. Reading it is time well spent.

yours

douglas

Last edited by koonaone; 02-17-2011 at 06:59 AM.
 
Old 02-17-2011, 08:00 AM   #2
rich_c
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I get the impression you're looking for something like Cygwin.
 
Old 02-17-2011, 08:30 AM   #3
jschiwal
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I would concentrate on learning bash and the commands in the coreutils package. Unix and Linux are different then windows. Forget about the desktop. Learn how you can pipe simple commands together to perform complicated tasks. That is learning the core philosophy behind Unix.
 
Old 02-17-2011, 10:19 AM   #4
koonaone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rich_c
I get the impression you're looking for something like Cygwin.
Hmm, I don't think so. Cygwin describe themselves as
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cygwin.com
a collection of tools which provide a Linux look and feel environment for Windows.
I'm looking for a collection of tools which provide a windows look and feel environment (or not!) for Linux.

With bloody good reason I don't trust MS or their windows to be reliable. Not safe tools for serious work. With all the futzing around to make it safe you may as well go back to pen and ink and a real desk, and hire out the manuscript typing and printing. And so on. You must get my point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jschiwal
Unix and Linux are different then windows. Forget about the desktop.
Hmm, I don't think so. My computers sit upon my desktop, in my library, among my maps and remote camera feeds. For me the screen desktop represents the final physical integrator between my purely mental processes, the world I'm examining, and what my mind chooses to produce from the affair. Books, films, a communiqué or a bullet.

Besides the isolated tools the machine represents, type, copy, paste, print, send, save, etc., which have been available since dos days, for me the main value is in the integration properties.

yours

douglas
 
Old 02-17-2011, 01:38 PM   #5
TobiSGD
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Linux is not a free and secure replacement for Windows, it is a free replacement for Unix. You should have a look at this.
Things are very different in Linux, even if you only use GUI apps.
My recommendation: Simplest way to learn Linux is to use it. If you encounter a problem do a search on Google for it. If that doesn't get you a solution feel free to ask here.
 
Old 02-17-2011, 08:32 PM   #6
frankbell
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So, if I get it right, it sounds like you want to reproduce a Windows-like look in Linux because you are comfortable with it (please correct me if I'm wrong). I can't see anything wrong with that.

A lot of folks think that KDE has a more Windowsy feel than Gnome. I'm agnostic on this.

A search for "windows-like themes linux" led me to this for Gnome:

http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Deskt...le-40317.shtml

Here's one that claims to look like Windows 7 in Gnome (search string "make linux look like windows"):

http://ubuntu-art.org/content/show.p...content=109348

You can use Linux quite happily without spending a lot of time at the command line or learning how to use grep.

A bunch of geeks who like to tinker with stuff, like many of us at LQ, are likely to favor the command line because the command line is always faster and more precise, but only when you know the commands.
 
Old 02-18-2011, 07:01 AM   #7
koonaone
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Hear hear frank bell

The user should rule! forever!

I had a horrific experience today. My wifes bud, owns a fruit stand, has a website, wishes to change some things, comes to me... Win 7. After 1 timed hour, I could not even change the background image on the desktop. At about 2 hours, I'm ready to break the fkr. Then I realise... This is a GOOD representation of what the guy really wants from his computer. If I mess with it, he's going to have more control, be able to do more things, and be forever unhappy because of it.

It was humbling to me. The guy has a machine capable of precision mortar patterns at a range of 200 miles, all he wants is better sales. Me, I just want to introduce a few little capabilities to make his life easier. Phew!

Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell
So, if I get it right, it sounds like you want to reproduce a Windows-like look in Linux because you are comfortable with it (please correct me if I'm wrong). I can't see anything wrong with that.
Not exactly, but ya, kinda. Whatever works. I have evolved to a twisted morph of win 98, then resisted the groundbreaking "improvements" of xp, vista.... At the same time I run a dos prog, cube calc, never equaled in the win or *nix world, and grep. I'm a hold out. Never expect perfection less I do it myself. And that's the attitude I'll take to linux I suppose.

I would welcome a better and different computer representation of my working environment... which is largely at a real life desktop. I understand that linux presents the possibility of creating the perfect solution, tailormade to the individual, rather than the one size fits all solution of windows. I applaud that. In the spirit of not re-inventing the wheel however, I will seek out linux's best representations of the desktop metaphor as a starting point.

Getting back to my original question:
Quote:
Can anyone suggest a specific source for a point by point explanation of the command basis of a generalised "desktop management" application (KDE,LXDE)? Better yet would be if it had some parallel comparison of the varied approaches taken by different distributions of linux.
And thanks to TobiSGD, that was a good article.

yours
douglas
 
Old 02-18-2011, 09:16 AM   #8
rich_c
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Having now understood the question, I think, the answer would seem to be there is no definitive comparison of the merits of different distributions and/or desktop environments. What I would say is that currently, for new(er)users, I'm recommending Linux Mint. I don't use it myself as my main distro, but have done a bit of testing and have found it to be very pleasant to use. I don't think you'd go far wrong...
 
  


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