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Old 08-16-2012, 06:30 AM   #16
padeen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjreilly View Post
padeen - I have never used a /srv partition. Today was the first day I've ever looked in that dir and there is nothing in it.
It's the new hierarchy for served files, such as web, etc. RH are moving to it and Debian looks like they are too. I recently installed a Debian Squeeze package of a web-server and it set up /srv (but admittedly with soft links to /var/www).
 
Old 08-16-2012, 07:50 AM   #17
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padeen - thanks for that info.
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:04 AM   #18
Aunnix
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It sounds like Debian is the way I should go, being a newbie? I've been told Ubuntu is pretty easy to learn and get the hang of, and since it is based of Debian they are similar. Then, per sjreilly above, Debian has alot of packages available and I like the idea of the rolling update.
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:22 AM   #19
Aunnix
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I run a number of servers (Debian, Ubuntu and CentOS), but I chose to run Debian at home because of the huge number of packages available, the fact that it a rolling-update install (ie no need to reinstall when the next version comes out) and it just keeps going with little (no) maintenance.

My preference would be to go for a 5 partitions;

10G /
5G /tmp
5G /var
RAM+2G swap
/home "the rest"

Given that you have 750G drives the amount taken up by the OS is small. You might even want to consider using an SSD drive for the OS then use the two 750G drives for /home mirror.

I would have a good long "play" with setting things up. Try different setups and just enjoy the experience.
I don't have a firewall running on my server as I have a NAT firewall on my DSL router, so only WWW and SSH ports are directed to that machine (and SSH is on a none-default port, away from prying eyes)

Saying that, I do use fail2ban to drop connections from people trying too hard to access my server.

Don't put all your data on the machine until you've had a GOOD LONG PLAY!

and BACKUP your data!!!!! (rdiff-backup is great for incremental backups, and clonezilla (mentioned previously) is great for taking a snapshot image of the OS).

padeen - I have never used a /srv partition. Today was the first day I've ever looked in that dir and there is nothing in it.
I have actually considered the third hard drive to house the OS and supporting files, but my I don't think my power supply has enough connections for all of them, lol. And, I'd really like to avoid spending more money. It may not matter much, but I'm already using a molex splitter to run an extra fan and I'm trying to keep the splitter adapters to a minimum, lol. I don't know how much my power supply can handle because I've been told the Radeon 4650 is a power hungry card. I did actually come across an old video card, so maybe it still works and can be used to consume less power. I don't plan to keep a monitor attached to it once everything is setup (maintenance will be done remotely) but I'd like to keep a video card in it in case I do need the monitor.

I didn't really plan to transfer any of the data until all packages/functions are setup and secure. Figured there is no point in wasting time transferring everything if I can't get the system functioning, lol. So far, I only have about 25GB of data (I'm not much of a file sharer / donwloader, lol) and it is all on my windows machine. I will keep this in a backup folder until everything is functioning and can be safely retained on my 750GB hard drive.
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:25 AM   #20
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In the event I can hook up a 3rd hard drive... what would be your suggestions on the size of hard drive which would be enough to house the OS and system files?
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:34 AM   #21
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I think a 40G SSD would work great. You don't need that much space, but you don't want to be running at capacity either, especially on an SSD.

I would steer clear of Ubuntu as well. Yes it's based on Debian, just like Fedora is based on RHEL, but that doesn't mean it's a good alternative for the same applications.
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:52 AM   #22
Aunnix
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I think a 40G SSD would work great. You don't need that much space, but you don't want to be running at capacity either, especially on an SSD.

I would steer clear of Ubuntu as well. Yes it's based on Debian, just like Fedora is based on RHEL, but that doesn't mean it's a good alternative for the same applications.

Thanks! I don't know if I'll have the cash to spend on a SSD, but I do have an IDE 40GB drive that I could throw in.

I do believe I'll start with Debian and see what happens. Does Debian have a desktop feature? I planned to install a desktop feature just to have it for learning purposes (and in case I can't figure out something in command line, maybe I can going through the desktop). I assume since it will be a server that no one is physically using everyday, I'd want to keep it pretty basic? Sounds like Debian is my best bet so far...
 
Old 08-16-2012, 11:26 AM   #23
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Great Installation How-tos at http://debian-handbook.info/browse/s...ion-steps.html and http://www.howtoforge.com/perfect-se...nx-ispconfig-3 (replacing nginx with apache - s'up to you)

Steve
 
Old 08-16-2012, 11:43 AM   #24
sjreilly
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You get an option to install the desktop packages (along with those for File, Web and other services) during the install.

A useful tool for server Admin is Webmin (http://www.webmin.com) which provide a web interface to many of the services that your server will run - its one of the first packages I install (not, however, available in the repositories but you can add the Webmin repo or install the .deb package).

I jut purchased a 60G SSD for 40 - which is pretty much all you would need for the OS (more than enough actually assuming you move the web site onto your main drives)

Your IDE drive would also fit the bill.

Steve
 
Old 08-16-2012, 01:20 PM   #25
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You get an option to install the desktop packages (along with those for File, Web and other services) during the install.

A useful tool for server Admin is Webmin (http://www.webmin.com) which provide a web interface to many of the services that your server will run - its one of the first packages I install (not, however, available in the repositories but you can add the Webmin repo or install the .deb package).

I jut purchased a 60G SSD for 40 - which is pretty much all you would need for the OS (more than enough actually assuming you move the web site onto your main drives)

Your IDE drive would also fit the bill.

Steve
Thanks for the links! And yes, that should definitely be enough space for the OS... I don't plan on having anything stored on the same drive/partition that the OS is installed on. Basically, I'd like the OS drive to house the OS and any installed packages I may use and the 750GB drives would be for only for storing data.
 
Old 08-17-2012, 04:21 AM   #26
sjreilly
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As you are planning to allow web access to your machine you should also get a domain name from your ISP, or if you have a fixed IP address from your ISP you could buy a domain name.
Or you can register free with DynDNS (http://dyn.com/dns/), use one of their domains and use the ddclient package to update the global DNS tables if your IP address changes.

Also consider running rkhunter(Rootkit Hunter) in order to check if you have been hacked.

Steve
 
Old 08-17-2012, 07:58 AM   #27
Aunnix
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As you are planning to allow web access to your machine you should also get a domain name from your ISP, or if you have a fixed IP address from your ISP you could buy a domain name.
Or you can register free with DynDNS (http://dyn.com/dns/), use one of their domains and use the ddclient package to update the global DNS tables if your IP address changes.

Also consider running rkhunter(Rootkit Hunter) in order to check if you have been hacked.

Steve
Thanks! I will be calling my ISP today, so I will ask about this as well.
 
Old 08-17-2012, 08:10 AM   #28
sjreilly
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Of course, your ISP will try to get you to use space on their server, which isn't what you are after.

One more limiting factor for a web site on a home server is upload speed - I have 12M download at home but 1M upload. Just remember that if you expect people to be able to download big files or pictures from your site(s).
 
Old 08-17-2012, 08:44 AM   #29
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Of course, your ISP will try to get you to use space on their server, which isn't what you are after.

One more limiting factor for a web site on a home server is upload speed - I have 12M download at home but 1M upload. Just remember that if you expect people to be able to download big files or pictures from your site(s).
hmm.. I have the "hi speed" connection or whatever for residential(home) services which I believe is at 8M. I'm not sure what the upload speed is. Shouldn't I only need to be worried about the download speed if I have files for viewers to download? I would assume the upload speed will only matter for the files I upload to my server through a website or for files that users/viewers can upload to my server/network (which I definitely do NOT plan to do, lol).
 
Old 08-17-2012, 08:49 AM   #30
sjreilly
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Their "download" is your "upload".
External viewers won't be able to dowload from your site faster than you can upload content.
Within your home network you are, of course, only limited by your home network speed - wireless, 100M or 1G LAN.
 
  


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