LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-01-2007, 10:14 AM   #1
jrduffis
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0
Stand Alone Linux system


Absolutely new to Linux. I have WD ide hard drives coming out my ears. How do I go about finding info to install a version of Linux on a bare hard drive. I have many more questions but please let us start here. I have been using microsoft xp pro since is came out and after looking at vista.......ugh enough Bill Gates I am looking for a new computer life.

Thanks
 
Old 02-01-2007, 10:50 AM   #2
moxieman99
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Distribution: Dabble, but latest used are Fedora 13 and Ubuntu 10.4.1
Posts: 420

Rep: Reputation: 146Reputation: 146
Welcome to Linux, and you've come to the right place for help.

Why not head over into the distro review section and see which distributions you'd like to try, based on your level of expertise and comfort level with working with software? Some distributions are much easier to use than others. Probably want to start with a distro that takes you by the hand at first (and then go from there once you get your sea legs).

Then compare system requirements within the distros you're looking at with what you have for hardware.

Then download, burn your iso images, set your BIOS to boot from CD,put Disk 1 in your CD drive, and reboot using one of those fresh drives.
 
Old 02-01-2007, 10:53 AM   #3
IndyGunFreak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Indpls
Distribution: Laptops: Debian Jessie XFCE, NAS: OpenMediaVault 3.0
Posts: 1,355

Rep: Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrduffis
Absolutely new to Linux. I have WD ide hard drives coming out my ears. How do I go about finding info to install a version of Linux on a bare hard drive. I have many more questions but please let us start here. I have been using microsoft xp pro since is came out and after looking at vista.......ugh enough Bill Gates I am looking for a new computer life.

Thanks
That depends on a lot of things... What do you want to do, what type of hardware you have, etc.
I think an all around, very easy to install/setup version of Linux, is Ubuntu. An excellent package mgr, which makes software very easy to install. Lots of community support(look at the Ubuntu Forum here on LQ). Ubuntu 6.10 gets my vote, but a search will give you a ton of answers.

That's the route I'd go..
http://www.ubuntu.com
http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Edgy
 
Old 02-01-2007, 10:53 AM   #4
rmakers
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Ann Arbor MI
Distribution: Mandriva 2006
Posts: 99

Rep: Reputation: 15
linux install

Well, this is pretty easy assuming you have installed windows a few times, although it can get more complicated if you have strange hardware or are dual booting.
1: choose your linux distro.
I have found ubuntu to be easy to install, and it's free (www.ubuntu.com)
^they will even mail you cds


2:
a: if you are not going to dual boot, boot off the ubuntu cd, follow the instructions. It's prety step by step and easy to follow.


b: If you are going to dual boot with windows, make sure windows is installed first, then back up everything thats important to you. Decide which drive and how much space you want to allocate to linux. Boot off the cd, follow the instructs, make sure you tell it the right answer when it gets to the part about the windows partition, not to erase it.

c:boot into you new linux system and find out if all your hardware works properly (most people will find that one or two pieces didn't autodetect exactly as expected, and you may have to tweak some drivers or settings)


d: Anything that doesn't work, check the wiki for your distro online, and try posting here. It should be easier than you think.


NOTE: If you want 3d acceleration you will probably have to install invidia or ATI drivers after you install linux, these can be tricky at times, post back here if you need help.
 
Old 02-01-2007, 10:56 AM   #5
netstrider
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: South Africa
Distribution: Debian 4.0 Etch
Posts: 71

Rep: Reputation: 15
Well installing Linux is easy, of course it depends on which distribution you use but I'd recommend something easy such as Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS, SuSE etc..The installations are pretty straight forward and they format your drives for you.

If you want to dual-boot along side Windows then you'd want to partition your drives first. You can do this either by using the integrated Partitioner in Ubuntu, or download GParted (A liveCD which is solely used for partitioning) or you can do this via Windows itself with something like Partition Magic, which costs money...You will have to create an ext2/3 or reiser or xfs filesystem on which your Linux distribution will run. and 256 ~ 512MB swap partition which is your "Page File/Virtual memory" for Linux.

When you install Linux either GRUB or LILO bootloaders will give you the option to either boot Windows or Linux

 
Old 02-01-2007, 10:56 AM   #6
IndyGunFreak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Indpls
Distribution: Laptops: Debian Jessie XFCE, NAS: OpenMediaVault 3.0
Posts: 1,355

Rep: Reputation: 70
If you have "WD Drives coming out your ears", I'd dedicate one of those drives completely to Ubuntu. That way, if by chance you have trouble, you haven't ran the risk of hosing your windows install. It doesn't happen to often, but people have hosed their main OS by trying to partition the drive.

IGF
 
Old 02-01-2007, 10:18 PM   #7
icechong
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2006
Posts: 42

Rep: Reputation: 15
try the Ubuntu. for testing purpose, you dont need to install it into HD. it boots from CD and runs on RAM. If you feel you like it, then you can install it by only a few clicks.
 
Old 02-01-2007, 11:54 PM   #8
pk2001
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Singapore
Distribution: Debian Sarge/Etch
Posts: 19

Rep: Reputation: 0
It really does depend what you are going to use it for, but also take a look at the links below. They may appeal to you:

The debian "stable" distro for disk-installable (relatively small download and the installation is straight forward from CD). Good for desktop and server. The new "Etch" version should be released as "stable" shortly.
www.debian.org/CD/netinst/

Puppy linux for linux with a really really small footprint (even smaller download and easier installation). Often used for embedded systems.
www.puppylinux.org

Knoppix for linux that runs from CD with more pre-installed utilities than you can poke a stick at.
www.knoppix.org
 
Old 02-03-2007, 03:12 AM   #9
jason_dustrose
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Arizona
Distribution: Currently toying with Debian-based MEPIS
Posts: 31

Rep: Reputation: 15
Smile Welcome To The Good Life...

Thanks for coming around my friend. Here's the deal, since you are just getting started, I would recommend something in the area of Fedora, Mandriva, or Ubuntu. Typically these distros are highly admirable when it comes to being user friendly, and I find that their hardware support is near the top. I wouldn't want you to start with SUSE, because I hate everything that has Novell attached to it. You might also check out Debian-based systems. MEPIS is what I am toying around with, and it's backed with superb hardware support, pretty light on resources, and it's only one CD. Plus, the CD is actually live so you can mess around to see if you like it before installing, but I'm just glad to see you here.
 
Old 02-03-2007, 07:15 AM   #10
IndyGunFreak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Indpls
Distribution: Laptops: Debian Jessie XFCE, NAS: OpenMediaVault 3.0
Posts: 1,355

Rep: Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_dustrose
Thanks for coming around my friend. Here's the deal, since you are just getting started, I would recommend something in the area of Fedora, Mandriva, or Ubuntu. Typically these distros are highly admirable when it comes to being user friendly, and I find that their hardware support is near the top. I wouldn't want you to start with SUSE, because I hate everything that has Novell attached to it. You might also check out Debian-based systems. MEPIS is what I am toying around with, and it's backed with superb hardware support, pretty light on resources, and it's only one CD. Plus, the CD is actually live so you can mess around to see if you like it before installing, but I'm just glad to see you here.
Although I strongly disagree with you about Mandriva(its SLOW), Fedora Core 6 is a great distro also. FC5 is one of the first distros I got to work *98%*. . I was very happy with it, then I tried Ubuntu, and got it to work 100%. I also find the package manager awesome, keeps me from ripping my hair out due to dependancy hell, etc..

IGF
 
Old 02-04-2007, 01:43 AM   #11
jason_dustrose
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: Arizona
Distribution: Currently toying with Debian-based MEPIS
Posts: 31

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyGunFreak
Although I strongly disagree with you about Mandriva(its SLOW), Fedora Core 6 is a great distro also. FC5 is one of the first distros I got to work *98%*. . I was very happy with it, then I tried Ubuntu, and got it to work 100%. I also find the package manager awesome, keeps me from ripping my hair out due to dependancy hell, etc..

IGF

Really ? Wow, I've got Mandriva 2007 running at home, and it does pretty well I think, but who knows why these things happen. I do agree with you about Fedora, although I would recommend going with 5 instead of 6 due to the fact that there are still tons of bugs to be worked out. I think they were a little too hasty with this one, and I was shocked to find out that 7 is coming out in April.

Furthermore, I find that Debian-based systems like Ubuntu and MEPIS have superb package systems, compared to EVERYTHING out there, but that could just be me.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 09:39 AM   #12
war1025
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Distribution: Debian: Squeeze AMD64
Posts: 318

Rep: Reputation: 31
Debian has the easiest package management I have ever seen. Granted, the only thing I've ever messed with is Windows. But it's amazing how much software is just an "apt-get" away.

Nobody threw in this caveat yet that I can see:
Sarge is old and tired. If you are going to install a new Debian system, go with Etch. That way you don't have to deal with the Xfree86 -> Xorg upgrade. Plus, you get updates with Etch. Sarge is pretty well unchanging.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 11:36 AM   #13
forsaken_pariah
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: Prattvegas
Distribution: Debian Etch, Kubuntu Feisty
Posts: 16

Rep: Reputation: 0
I agree Debian has the best package management out there, but it is relatively difficult to install. It was the first distro I tried to install which turned out to be a mistake. I failed horribly at it the first 3 times i tried to install before finally turning to FC6, but after hearing all the great stuff everybody had to say about Ubuntu, I decided to try that. I absolutely loved it, all except for the fact that I hate GNOME, so I installed Kubuntu and used it for a few months before my hard drive crashed, after which I finally got a working Debian installation to work which I've been using for about 3 months and counting.


Final word:
I would suggest Kubuntu for anybody just starting out with Linux because it's hard to believe how user friendly it is, not to mention the fact that they'll give you enough free CDs to give a few to your friends who are just as tired of M$ as we are .
 
Old 02-04-2007, 05:33 PM   #14
jacook
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Townsville, Australia
Distribution: PCLinuxOS .93 Junior
Posts: 437

Rep: Reputation: 30
Kubuntu
http://www.kubuntu.org/


Mandriva
http://www.mandriva.com/community/mandrivaone


PCLinuxOS .92
http://ftp.nluug.nl/pub/metalab/dist...glish/preview/
ftp://ftp.nluug.nl/pub/metalab/distr...glish/preview/

This is the distro I use and recommend, Why because it works right out of the box. No need to configure Everything, everything just works. It also comes as a 1 CD install that is a live CD that you can install later if you wish.

Mephis
http://www.mepis.org/


depending on which Distro you choose there are many guides out there:

Installing Mempis
http://www.mepisguides.com/install/i...artitions.html
http://www.mepisguides.com/install/i...and-clear.html

Dual boot Ubuntu 6.10 +XP
http://www.ubufied.com/2006/11/01/ub...nshots/#more-4

Installing Kubuntu 6.10 +XP
http://www.ubufied.com/2006/11/01/ku...nshots/#more-1

Installing Edubuntu 6.10 + XP
http://www.ubufied.com/2006/11/02/ed...nshots/#more-6

Installing Xubuntu and XP
http://www.ubufied.com/2006/11/05/xu...nshots/#more-7

General install guide
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Partition/...pes.html#types

Jake
 
Old 02-20-2007, 02:46 PM   #15
jrduffis
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 9

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks everyone for the help. I finally wiped a hard drive clean and installed Ubuntu 6.10 from a dvd source and I want to tell you that it was the smoothest installation I have ever done (about 150 installs of MS) after the up dates were installed I cannot find a single issue and love the hell out of linux so far. I tossed the windows xp drive in the bottom drawer and said good night. Thanks again

jrduffis
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Firefox 2.0: Install on a Stand Alone System Armor Linux - Software 3 02-02-2007 09:12 AM
Stand alone Linux games? broom Linux - Games 6 01-04-2007 06:22 PM
System goes out of stand-by after 1 sec OR13 Linux - General 1 08-12-2006 08:46 AM
CDMA Stand Alone Modem For Linux xyzxyz Linux - Wireless Networking 1 03-07-2005 01:19 AM
what does the $ stand for in linux ?? Kilahchris Linux - Newbie 23 09-07-2004 12:23 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:36 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration