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Old 03-14-2013, 06:44 PM   #1
TomConnolly
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Registered: Dec 2012
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Something's eating up my disk space


I have four 68-MB files called "pulse-shm-..." where the ... represents a 10-digit number. Anyone have any idea what these files are? I found them in media/shm folder.
I want to toss them, but since I don't know if they're associated with any program I use, I'm afraid to. Anyone know what these files are?
 
Old 03-14-2013, 07:08 PM   #2
custangro
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You can do an 'lsof' of the files to see what process is holding on to them.

--C
 
Old 03-14-2013, 09:05 PM   #3
jpollard
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I think these are actually in /dev/shm rather than /media.

The description matches the use of shared memory. They can be fairly large, but they are not disk files - these are shared memory segments used to pass data to/from the pulse audio subsystem.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 09:06 PM   #4
frankbell
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They appear to be somehow related to Pulse Audio, according to this link.
 
Old 03-14-2013, 09:25 PM   #5
TomConnolly
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Thank you all for responding.
I ran a lsof (which I had never heard of before) and a lot of info came into the terminal, but it was too hard to read. I'll try it again for just that particular folder. But from what I understand, lsof will show only open files, and by that I guess is meant files in use. I was looking for big files to dump because after only three months or so of using Ubuntu, almost all of the 20 gig I partitioned off is eaten up. I have a huge hard drive, but was unable to do some things in Ubuntu because I didn't have enough room on the disk.
So my REAL question should have been, how can I find out, without opening every folder and subfolder, what's eating up all my space. A second question is whether I can re- repartition my 1 T hard drive to increase that space without endangering the files I need. I'm not storing a bunch of pictures and I have no music files on this 20 Gig partition.
I also find it hard to understand exactly what is on the Ubuntu partition, since I can migrate to all my Vista files as well through the terminal. The Windows file system might be inferior to the Unix, but it is simpler to understand, in my opinion.
Thanks again.
 
Old 03-15-2013, 02:44 AM   #6
chrism01
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1.
Quote:
The Windows file system might be inferior to the Unix, but it is simpler to understand, in my opinion.
Actually, that's just because you're more used to it (honestly).

2. Anyway, on to your problem.

Start by looking at the disk layout; run the following and post the results.
(BTW: you should read up on each cmd we mention eg use search util at http://linux.die.net/man/, or on your local system it would be 'man cmd-name'. man = manual pages )
Code:
df -hT

# just in case, also do
df -i


fdisk -l  #that's a lowercase 'L' BTW
3. for any dirs mentioned by the above cmds you, you can drill down looking for disk space with the 'du' cmd
eg
Code:
du -sh <somedir>
4. Look to see if you have logrotate setup; should be under eg /etc/logrotate.d and main cfg /etc/logrotate.conf.

5. lets see what your system is doing
Code:
top
That lot should do for a start
 
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