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Old 06-15-2005, 11:05 AM   #46
slackwarebilly
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Talking thx!


thanks for the tips, they helped me!

slackwarebilly
 
Old 06-15-2005, 02:27 PM   #47
Linux_n00b_57
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How do you compile source code?
 
Old 06-15-2005, 02:53 PM   #48
craigevil
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LinuxQuestions.org- Compiling Programs from Source - LinuxAnswers
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ticle&artid=15
 
Old 06-15-2005, 03:00 PM   #49
slackwarebilly
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Cool Well... (prepare for long winded explanation)

If you're lucky (he, he) the distributor will have their source code in this format. There is a script called "configure" or something along those lines. It checks everything there is to know about your computer and if you have needed dependencies and if you have the proper C compiler. (In slackware you're probably going to want to go to wxwidgets.org and download the source for this compiler thing. A lot of programs I've tried need it.)

Type "./configure" or "sh configure" stuff will happen

after this is finished, type "make" This will probably take the longest (quite awhile)

then type "make install" (more stuff happening)

Now in any Konsole or terminal you should be able to type the name of the program or something to get it to work for example. "gaim" or "cedega [name of .exe]" will run stuff in the terminal.

Sometimes there are different install scripts with other names like "install.sh" . Guess what.

type "sh install.sh" or whatever it may be. You're gonna have to look around to find the right install scripts before you try compiling.

Still other times there are a series of directories that you may recognize. (i.e. usr, etc, lib)

You need to copy all of these files in the .tgz or whatever into the corresponding directories on your system. if the program is say ganim8, inside the ganim8 tgz is "/ganimate/usr/lib"
You need to copy the files in the previously mentioned folder into your system's "file/usr/lib"
This is how you do it foe all directories

Other source codes make you run python or java scripts, (i.e. .py, .jar) I don't lnow how to run these, but you can look it up. If this is confusing keep asking and google searching until you get it. Once you do get it, it is the funnest (yes funnest) thing you will ever do in linux. This is what makes you a Slackware user, you refuse to use buggy precompiled packages!(1.e. debian, fedora, suse, mandrake)

I'm tired of typing, go ahead and ask questions,

regards,

slackwarebilly
 
Old 06-15-2005, 03:38 PM   #50
craigevil
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Debian packages are not buggy. Question: is English your original language?

The link in my last post explains how to compile from source very well.
 
Old 06-15-2005, 05:23 PM   #51
slackwarebilly
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Unhappy Sorry

I did not see your post before, just went straight to typing, you know I get those e-mail things. I haven't had nice experiences with any packaging system. That's why I compile from source, and as long as you have the compiler it makes a good tool in other distros when their packaging system fails. I have never used straight up debian, though, only offshoots. Anywho no hard feelings, I was trying to be in depth, too about when people's "source code" is actually a python or Java script, or when you are supposed to copy some directories or binaries or when people's configure and install scripts aren't named the standard names. English is my native language, I'm just long-winded and not a very good communicator(at least with words).

Peace, man,

slackwarebilly

Last edited by slackwarebilly; 06-15-2005 at 05:24 PM.
 
Old 06-15-2005, 05:46 PM   #52
strwood
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While I am also a complete newbie, I prefer Slackware. I am using Slack 10 - I tried 10.1 but did not find it a success. Have also tried Red Hat, which I found almost impossible to install & assumes you either know everything or nothing. Slack has good support for newbs in the form of the"Book" at slackware.com and also gives me the chance to actually learn how to find my way around Linux. The command line interface (yes, it does come with KDE & GNOME) is more difficult than GUI interfaces when coming from Dos but does allow for mistakes. If you want to learn Linux, this is the one I'd recommend.
strwood.
 
Old 06-16-2005, 03:36 PM   #53
tobrien
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Re: So, I'm moving to Linux soon...

Quote:
Originally posted by Linux_n00b_57
Well, I'm bring back an old computer PIII 450MHz(i think), 96MB RAM, no graphics card or hard drive yet....anyways i'm planing on using it for homework, research, chatting, reports, learning how to use linux, learning to hack, really old games(FF7, Rainbow Six, just old school games that are kicking around, HL1)
I know nothing of Linux, and it will be on a network with a windows machine.
So what version of Linux should i use?
If I were you, though I'm not I would try to install one of the following three Fedora Core 3, Unbuntu, or Kunbuntu. I have FC3 loaded on one machine and in 8 months have set up a web server, a small home network (with two window boxes), and have learned a bit about the command line and linux itself. I also installed the other two distributions, one on my laptop next to windows and the other on a machine with a 1 GB harddrive. All three of these I have played with a little. Unbuntu and Kunbuntu are both a bit more locked down then Fedora, but really none of the three were hard to install.

Plus as long as you can get here you will be able to get help!! As for your goals I would bet Fedora would be your best bet, but this is just my thought, and I am still a newbie.
 
Old 06-16-2005, 05:38 PM   #54
slackwarebilly
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Arrow Careful!

I've tried those distros and after awhile couldn't live with 'em. Don't depend on a binary package! Optomize it for your system. (sorry for yelling) Fedora and Ubuntu reminde me of too much Windows in different ways. Learn Slack, it is your destiny...

slackwarebilly

NOTE: let's not have a distrowar here, fedora and ubuntu were solid systems, just I'm not sure about running Gnome or KDE that come with those distros on his comp
 
  


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