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Old 06-13-2005, 04:51 PM   #16
johnson_steve
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distro - Distribution of linux like Suse, Slackware, Fedora etc.

you can install a wide range of DE/WM on any disrto you choose. some look like windows some don't. most can be customized to look like whatever you want. Slackware can do those things as can any other distro when set up properly. I't mostly a matter of what you like.

as for the monopoly M$ has something like 90% of the desktop os market. they leverage this to help them in other areas of business and to put the competition out of business. for example netscape M$ didn't ever write IE the code was licensed and then IE given away and other products with it. Netscape couldn't pay people to use their browser that was their core business, but microsoft could afford to do this and when the company that licensed M$ the code for IE claimed that M$ wasn't paying the royalties M$ said they didn't have to pay them because they weren't selling IE and made no money off it. you should check out www.fuckwindows.com it has many more such examples and other good links.

Last edited by johnson_steve; 06-13-2005 at 05:00 PM.
 
Old 06-13-2005, 04:54 PM   #17
Linux_n00b_57
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Quote:
Originally posted by johnson_steve
distro - Distribution of linux like Suse, Slackware, Fedora etc.

you can install a wide range of DE/WM on any disrto you choose. some look like windows some don't. most can be customized to look like whatever you want. Slackware can do those things as can any other distro when set up properly. I't mostly a matter of what you like.
I still don't get it...a Distro is Slackware, or SuSE, or Fedora?(and any other Linux version not mentioned).

so a DE/WM would be what your desktop looks like?

Thanks for everything so far
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:15 PM   #18
johnson_steve
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yes a distro is any linux. thats how they come in distributions with everything you need to run your computer. windows only comes with one distribution but linux has many flavors.

The Desktop environment / Window manager is everything you can see and click when you have a gui - these run ontop of X the graphics system of which you have 2 choices: XFree86 and Xorg - X runs on top of the linux command line interface (Looks kindof like dos but way more powerful)


DE are bigger and have lots of extra utilities (like kde has k3b {cd&dvd burning app.}) where as a window manager is more minimalistic and you add the utilities you want these usual run faste then the DE i can think of
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:21 PM   #19
Linux_n00b_57
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Ok, i think i understand...Now, what is the differences between XFree86 and Xorg? and can you change your DE/WM whenever you like?
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:22 PM   #20
craigevil
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"A Linux distribution or GNU/Linux distribution (or a distro) is a Unix-like operating system comprising software components such as the Linux kernel, the GNU toolchain, and assorted free and open source software. Some proprietary software is found in certain distributions and is not free software. A Linux Distribution or distro, en parlante is created by individuals, groups and organizations from around the world.

Companies such as Red Hat, SUSE and Mandriva, and community projects such as Debian and Gentoo Linux, assemble and test the software before releasing their distribution. There are currently over two hundred Linux distribution projects in active development, revising and improving their respective distribution."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_distribution

"A window manager is software that controls the placement and appearance of application windows under the X Window System, a graphical user interface on Unix systems that enables a user to interact with a number of application programs simultaneously. Each one typically has its own independent window, and when a window manager is available, interaction between the X server and its clients is redirected through the window manager."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Window_manager

Window Managers for X
http://xwinman.org/index.php


If you 'REALLY' want to learn GNU/Linux then I would install either Slackware or Debian, either will run on a slower system. Use a window manager like Fluxbox or IceWM. My system has a 1.8Anthlon with 2GB ddr ram and I still use IceWM because it is faster than KDE or Gnome, plus I like the fact that I can icon my apps if the systemtray like windows.

For a decent set of links and a good way to start out check out:
How to Learn and Use GNU/Linux
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:29 PM   #21
johnson_steve
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Quote:
Originally posted by Linux_n00b_57
Ok, i think i understand...Now, what is the differences between XFree86 and Xorg? and can you change your DE/WM whenever you like?
Choice mostly, and they have a different config file. Xfree86 has been around longer and Xorg is newer. When I changed from SuSE (used XFree86) to Gentoo (uses Xorg by default) I noticed little difference.

yes you can even have a bunch of them and pick one when you log on.
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:31 PM   #22
Linux_n00b_57
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I haven't started reading this yet...but since it won't be for about a month till the computer is set up for use(need to get some money first), where can i learn all about linux and the systems and tools, and what can be done and can't be done? and pretty much every thing?
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:39 PM   #23
johnson_steve
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you can get books or magazines (Linux journal kicks ass. I can get it at the local pick and save {grocery store in Wisconsin}) or try www.linux.org and www.tldp.org. you can find alot on google.
 
Old 06-13-2005, 05:57 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by johnson_steve
you can get books or magazines (Linux journal kicks ass. I can get it at the local pick and save {grocery store in Wisconsin}) or try www.linux.org and www.tldp.org. you can find alot on google.
Thank you


When i was reading something it said Slackware is for more advanced users and will take more experience to use to full potential...now i'm up for the challenge of learning and going through hell to use it...but moving from a windows machine to a linux machine is gonna be big...how long is the learning curve? a week? a month? 6 months? a year? do you just keep learning? is it simple to use, just complex because you are used to something else? I am not saying i don't want Slackware because it will be hard...it want it more that way...i just want to know what i'm in for.
 
Old 06-13-2005, 06:56 PM   #25
craigevil
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The Revised Slackware Book Project
http://slackbook.org/

Slackware Linux Essentials
http://slackbook.lizella.net/html/book.html

"MEPIS and Xandros are considered the best for new Linux users who want to get productive in Linux as soon as possible without having to master all its complexities. On the other end of the spectrum, Gentoo, Debian, Slackware and FreeBSD are more advanced distributions that require plenty of learning before they can be used effectively. Mandriva, Red Hat, Ubuntu and SUSE can be classified as good "middle-road" distributions. Knoppix is a so-called live CD - it is great for trying out Linux without getting your hands dirty as it runs directly from a CD, no installation required."
http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major


"Reasons to Choose Debian"
http://www.debian.org/intro/why_debian
 
Old 06-13-2005, 07:37 PM   #26
piscikeeper
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linux is a continual learning experience,just the same as windows.the biggest difference is the timeframe for learning.XP is 4-5 years old now.linux dristros are more fluid with updates approximately every 6 months on the slower updating ones.this means bugs are fixed,not patched.
vector uses the red hat annoconda installer to install slackware with kde,so if you like the look of vector,it's easy enough to configure slack to look like that.
the reputation of slack being for advanced users is really a non-issue anymore.if you can partition a drive and follow the install steps,it really is quite easy.shilo's guide in the slack forum takes you through it step by step.
once you get a vid card you can run the live cd distros like knoppix (no need for a hard drive) ,although 96mb of ram is really going to hurt speed wise.
 
Old 06-13-2005, 09:59 PM   #27
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Slackware!!!! Slackware is excellent as coming with a full desktop OS as well as being highly flexible, stable, customizable. RAM is your only prob, but like the guys said, ICEWM or some other simple window manager will do ya fine. Although a lot of distros I've tried took several tries installing, they were all worth it. Slack is the best way ever to learn. Slackware comes with office apps and web browsers and so forth, but not openoffice specifically. You can always install it and it would be a good idea to check out some tutorials on compiling from source code. This is primarily how you should install stuff. Have fun with Slack!!! Need help: ask!!!

Good luck!!!

slackwarebilly
 
Old 06-14-2005, 01:16 PM   #28
Linux_n00b_57
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Thanks...can i get old PC133 RAM today? would i have to buy used RAM?

Aside from that i think i'm pretty well set with the OS, and the WM...How much RAM should i get? 128MB, 256MB? and my Graphics card should i just get some old cheap MX or some random used one? or are there certain ones i shouldn't get cause they will conflict with Linux, or will any old graphics card run fine on linux?
 
Old 06-14-2005, 01:27 PM   #29
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Hardware

I am currently running a VIA Samuel Cyrix III 800mhz (its a slow stupid processor, and it lagged like heck just starting and doing stuff in the Windows XP THAT IT CAME WITH!) anywho, it runs beautifully in linux. I have Jedi Knight II and Jedi Academy running flawlessly online. I have a NVIDIA MX 420 (64 meg). NVIDIA's drivers for linux are impressive. If given a choice go NVIDIA. ATI is kinda partial to Windows and only recently started releasing limited drivers. Your old card should work fine. 133 RAM is available today at your local electronics store! (hopefully). Whatever you can afford, but usually nowadays the difference in cost between 128, 256, and 512 isn't too much. 128 is fine to add, 256 is great. (I'm running 256 right now). If you need specific help with Slackware and would like to be guided through it by a real person, just lemme know. I'm willing to help.

Best of Luck

slackwarebilly
 
Old 06-14-2005, 01:41 PM   #30
Linux_n00b_57
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Re: Hardware

Quote:
Originally posted by slackwarebilly
I am currently running a VIA Samuel Cyrix III 800mhz (its a slow stupid processor, and it lagged like heck just starting and doing stuff in the Windows XP THAT IT CAME WITH!) anywho, it runs beautifully in linux. I have Jedi Knight II and Jedi Academy running flawlessly online. I have a NVIDIA MX 420 (64 meg). NVIDIA's drivers for linux are impressive. If given a choice go NVIDIA. ATI is kinda partial to Windows and only recently started releasing limited drivers. Your old card should work fine. 133 RAM is available today at your local electronics store! (hopefully). Whatever you can afford, but usually nowadays the difference in cost between 128, 256, and 512 isn't too much. 128 is fine to add, 256 is great. (I'm running 256 right now). If you need specific help with Slackware and would like to be guided through it by a real person, just lemme know. I'm willing to help.

Best of Luck

slackwarebilly
Thanks...

Right now the old card is in the new machine, its a MX 440 64MB...not at all great...So i'm going to a second hand store for all the parts i need...

I was on linux.org and i was wondering what Slackware looks like straight out of the box(so to speak)...does it look like good old Dos? or does it have a GUI or WM?
 
  


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