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Old 09-01-2014, 05:19 PM   #1
Cliffl
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Set up a dual boot system


Been meaning to do this for some time now. I dabbled with Unix back in the 70'a but have forgotten everything now.
I have Windows 7 one one drive and Linux mint 17 on another.
Somehow I have managed to get a window up to give me the choice of what I boot to.
Originally I installed Mint to a lone drive on the system having disconnected the windows drive first. Did not want to make any mistakes and destroy Windows.
So what is the file I should edit, I notice that the type in the file where I make the choice of operating systems is so small as to be almost unreadable.
Would appreciate some guidance, I have learnt that grub cannot be edited as it is a read only file and from what I have read even if you do manage to change it it will revert back to its original state afterwords.

Regards Cliff
 
Old 09-01-2014, 05:48 PM   #2
yancek
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Quote:
I have learnt that grub cannot be edited as it is a read only file and from what I have read even if you do manage to change it it will revert back to its original state afterwords.
Best to unlearn that as it is completely inaccurate and also find a better source of information.
If you edit the Grub2 menu which is called grub.cfg and update grub, it will remove anything you have changed only in that file. That is the behavior meant by the developers. If you make a change to that file and do NOT update-grub, it can remain unchanged. This is explained at the top of that file.

So if I understand your situation, you now have a grub menu when you boot that allows you to select to boot either Linux Mint or windows 7, is that accurate? Your problem then is simply that the grub fonts are too small and you have difficulty reading the entries, correct?

The link below explains it, scroll down to option # 7 on the page

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1542338

I read another post where a user had the same problem and simply opened a terminal and entered: sudo update-grub
I would make that my first option.
 
Old 09-01-2014, 05:52 PM   #3
EDDY1
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Linuxmint uses grub2 which if you want to add another OS you would install without bootloader then boot to mint & run update-grub. If you're worried about windows partition it's fine if you disconnect mint drive you should see yor normal windows boot menu.
Grubs editable configuration files are /etc/default/grub & those under /etc/grub. The ones under /etc/grub are for editing OS entries & themes etc...
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2
Also grub found your windows entry when you did an update.

Last edited by EDDY1; 09-01-2014 at 05:54 PM.
 
Old 09-01-2014, 05:59 PM   #4
EDDY1
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@ yancek
grub.cfg is not to be edited directly, it's to be edited from /etc/default & the others in /etc/grub
http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/g...mozTocId542243
 
Old 09-01-2014, 09:44 PM   #5
yancek
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grub.cfg is not to be edited directly, it's to be edited from /etc/default & the others in /etc/grub
And the reason for that is explained at the top of the file, because running update-grub will change it if the change is not also added to one of the files in /etc/grub.d. That's the only reason, which I also explained in my post. I edit it all the time because in some cases it is a lot simpler when I am only going to use a menuentry one time. Never had any problems with it.

Last edited by yancek; 09-01-2014 at 11:50 PM.
 
Old 09-02-2014, 10:00 AM   #6
Cliffl
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Editing the Grub File

Maybe it would have been easier if I had asked you all to teach me Chinese.
First from EDDY1 I quote
"grub.cfg is not to be edited directly, its to be edited from .etc/default & the others in /etc/grub.
So thats 2 separate places to be edited? or is it?
Then YANCEK article says
running update-grub will change it if the change is not also added to one of the files in /etc/grub.d.
So is that 3 files one has to edit.

Now do not think I do not appreciate your help but would like to know if I can just edit one file to do the job if that is possible.
I like to know how things work, and this looks highly confusing.

Regards Cliff

P.S. I am 70 next year and have been building windows systems for a very very long time without much of a problem, compared with this Windows is a walk in the park !!
 
Old 09-02-2014, 10:21 AM   #7
syg00
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffl View Post
... have been building windows systems for a very very long time without much of a problem, compared with this Windows is a walk in the park !!
That's a byproduct of having choice.
Most Windows users are not even aware they have a boot-loader - and the brain-dead offering they have is only minimally aware of the concept of multi-booting.

Another "problem" is that we (Linux users) try to give all the information we can. And quite often answer the question (actually) asked, rather than what was imagined was asked.

If you want changes to persist you must update the "default" file(s) mentioned above - then run update-grub to generate the cfg file which is actually used at boot.
There is no "one file" like a boot.ini - there used to be, but things have moved past that.
 
Old 09-02-2014, 02:12 PM   #8
Cliffl
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I do appreciate what you are saying, unfortunately I had a Heart bypass in the early 90's which killed my memory, so things take a long time to sink in.
I thought the obvious thing would be to start with the Boot loader first and go on from there.
So I guess I need to get a book or something from the net and work my way through it. Not worried about a backup at the moment have mint 17 on a separate drive so if I screw it up can re install it again.
So back to the drawing board and dream of working in Sydney teaching at the Rolling Mills, cannot remember the name of it now too long ago.

Regards Cliff

Last edited by Cliffl; 09-02-2014 at 02:13 PM. Reason: typos
 
Old 09-02-2014, 03:38 PM   #9
yancek
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You seem to have two problems. One is that you have no entry to boot windows although that isn't really clear from your post. If that is the case and you can boot Mint, open a terminal from the icon in the lower left and enter this command: sudo update-grub
Hit the Enter key and you will be prompted for your user password, enter it and again hit Enter. You can watch the output and if windows is detected it will show in the output and you can try rebooting. Obviously, if you had the windows drive dis-connected when you isntalled Mint there would be no entry for windows. That command may resolve the text size icon, if not check the options at the other link I posted.
 
  


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