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Old 10-31-2013, 01:23 PM   #1
ChrisPbass
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Question Server distro choice.


I apologize as this thread is probably a little on the weak side considering I should probably just be combing this site for answers. However! I am a newb so I get a little leeway, right? The # of distros is pretty amazing.

Here's my deal:

I am pretty much a Linux newb. I've run mint and fedora off USB very briefly while troubleshooting a new server / windows install that I built. I *will* be learning Linux beyond just dealing w/this server. That is down the road a bit. I'm studying something else at this point.

I am looking for the fast track to getting the server I built up and running w/a Linux distro as the engine. I know there are loads of free docs to read and that I should be reading up to make sure I know what I'm doing. Or at least to know what I'm getting into. So, what should I read that will, relatively, quickly get me to the point where I can install, setup and administer this server?
The server is for a home business but that business will not rely on this server. It will basically file serve the client files. That will come down the road. At this point, I'm messing w/several PCs in my home and I need to utilize the storage capability of the server.

Eventually the server will be used to:
file serve for the small business (accounting software),
store and stream vids/pix,
backup 3-5 windows PCs
does not necessarily need to be connected to the 'net, just the home network.

Which distro would work for me?
I've been told 'just throw Samba on there.'

The server has a AMD A series chip w/onboard video and a gigabyte board w/Sata 6 and USB 3.
I have 2 3TB Seagate NAS drives and 1 1TB Seagate Barracuda. I have several external drives to backup the backup via onboard USB 3. I also happen to have a pcie USB 3 card.
I probably have 2 gigs of pics/vid to store but will be shooting more 1080 vid as times goes by and those files are huge. I am not manipulating the vid...it's just vid of fam/kids.

BTW - I did see a few similar threads but they are years old.

Also, I assume this is in the right forum but if not will an admin please move it to the appropriate place?

Last edited by ChrisPbass; 10-31-2013 at 01:25 PM.
 
Old 10-31-2013, 01:41 PM   #2
snowpine
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Lots of "best server distro?" advice in this thread:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ar-4175441845/

When you tried Mint and Fedora, did you have a preference between those two? If you like Mint, then you would probably enjoy Debian for server use. If you prefered Fedora, then I think CentOS would be a good server distro for you. (Mint is in the ".deb" family and Fedora is in the ".rpm" family.)
 
Old 10-31-2013, 02:00 PM   #3
DavidMcCann
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CentOS is easier to configure than Debian (some of the Mint tools are their own extras), especially when it comes to services and security. I also find the Red Hat documentation better than Debian's (it's written for paying customers, of course). But both are good quality: they consistently rate as the two most popular systems for web servers, for example.
 
Old 10-31-2013, 02:03 PM   #4
szboardstretcher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
CentOS is easier to configure than Debian (some of the Mint tools are their own extras), especially when it comes to services and security. I also find the Red Hat documentation better than Debian's (it's written for paying customers, of course). But both are good quality: they consistently rate as the two most popular systems for web servers, for example.
Im a long time user of Rhel/SL/Centos and Ubuntu. I think the only thing truly different when configuring the two is file locations. The actual configuration isn't any different.

Any specifics you are referring to?
 
Old 10-31-2013, 02:06 PM   #5
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Just click on the box in this links link and pick servers instead of live . . . plus check my signatures first link and have fun.

Last edited by jamison20000e; 10-31-2013 at 02:07 PM.
 
Old 10-31-2013, 03:57 PM   #6
carlosinfl
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CentOS 6.x IMO is the best server Linux distribution I used that will add value for you. Value meaning that anything you learn can be applied to most (80%) of companies running Linux bc they're a RHEL source based distribution. So many companies rely on / use RHEL or CentOS. For home / personal / fun Linux usage, I rely love Debian (not Ubuntu) but learning this can be tricky because Debian doesn't do things like RHEL / CentOS and could cause you confusion if you're just starting out.
 
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Old 10-31-2013, 04:40 PM   #7
jmc1987
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Everyone here has their own Opinion for what distro to choose or what is best and isn't to reliable to give you which direction to go.

I would suggest do some research for starters.

1. Ask what kind of things you will need.
2. Are you using commercial software? If so what distros are compatable?
3. Are you looking to compile software or used pre built packages?

Those are some of the questions you need to ask first.

CentOS is Stable and a great distro for a Server.
Fedora is a great desktop.
Ubuntu is a good Desktop, but Mint is better as in more polished, but Ubuntu provides a more polished software center. Both have the same compatiablity for packages such as you can instasll in Ubuntu package onto a Mint Machine (exludeding Mint LDE).
Debian is a great desktop and a rock solid server. Has such a long line of testing it is amoung the most stable Distributions. Debian Testing is also considered stable which Mint and Ubuntu is based off of. (I used Debian Testing as a desktop).
Slackware is also a rock solid stable platform, but requires more work to get where you would like it.

So out of everything again what distro to choose is an opinion, but I suggest Debian. It is just as easy to configure as CentOS and has one of the biggest communities backing it.

So what you choose is based on your needs, Shop wisely.
 
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Old 10-31-2013, 10:19 PM   #8
chrism01
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As above, you ahve a few choices (mine is Centos of course ).
Re backup, have a read of http://www.zmanda.com/quick-backup-setup.html.
In that context, will all client files be copied to the server, or moved? In the latter case, you only have one copy, so backup to a removable media as well.
Ideally off-site for company stuff; data is more valuable than HW/SW - seriously.
 
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Old 10-31-2013, 10:54 PM   #9
ChrisPbass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
As above, you ahve a few choices (mine is Centos of course ).
Re backup, have a read of http://www.zmanda.com/quick-backup-setup.html.
In that context, will all client files be copied to the server, or moved? In the latter case, you only have one copy, so backup to a removable media as well.
Ideally off-site for company stuff; data is more valuable than HW/SW - seriously.
I planned on backing up to USB drives and then storing offsite as the file on the server will be the working file and only file, less backups.

I'll check the link. Thank you.
 
Old 10-31-2013, 11:18 PM   #10
ChrisPbass
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Ok

Thanks to all for the help. What can I start studying to get a background on the core of Linux?
 
Old 10-31-2013, 11:45 PM   #11
jmc1987
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisPbass View Post
Ok

Thanks to all for the help. What can I start studying to get a background on the core of Linux?
Well what do you mean by the core of Linux?

Basic commands and how to manage Linux?

Or do you just want to get down and dirty all the way to build your own Kernel?

If learning Linux the Core and up, Slackware is your man, however if you just want to use it, I suggest you start with a brief overview of your distro of choice.

http://tldp.org/ has all kinds of great stuff. Check them out, they should rocket your Linux Life style
 
Old 11-01-2013, 06:28 AM   #12
chrism01
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For Centos you can also read the RHEL manuals eg http://www.linuxtopia.org/, especially the SysAdmin links.
If you are new to the cmd line, here's an oldie but goldie http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
 
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Old 11-01-2013, 12:58 PM   #13
ChrisPbass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmc1987 View Post
Well what do you mean by the core of Linux?

Basic commands and how to manage Linux? I need this...

Or do you just want to get down and dirty all the way to build your own Kernel? I would really to be able to start up the server and then continue to learn.

If learning Linux the Core and up, Slackware is your man, however if you just want to use it, I suggest you start with a brief overview of your distro of choice.

http://tldp.org/ has all kinds of great stuff. Check them out, they should rocket your Linux Life style
so much info

Last edited by ChrisPbass; 11-01-2013 at 01:00 PM.
 
Old 11-01-2013, 12:59 PM   #14
ChrisPbass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
For Centos you can also read the RHEL manuals eg http://www.linuxtopia.org/, especially the SysAdmin links.
If you are new to the cmd line, here's an oldie but goldie http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
I think I'm going w/Centos and I do have some experience w/ Win CMD line but I definitely need to learn more.

Thanks to everyone! I will be back w/a billion questions once I get rollin'!
 
Old 11-01-2013, 01:10 PM   #15
DavidMcCann
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I'll endorse Chris's recommendation of the Rute User's Tutorial and Exposition. It's very old and some things are obsolete, but it really explains things in language you can understand. There's also another pdf out there somewhere called the Unix Toolbox, which gives you a classified list of commands.

Some useful sites are
http://tille.garrels.be/training/tldp/
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/HOWTO-INDEX/howtos.html
http://lowfatlinux.com/
http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/
 
  


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