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Old 07-28-2006, 10:00 PM   #1
kittaanna
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Question running x on windows


hi
We have telnet execute unix commands on our college
computers. Can i install X-programs on windows without
administrator knowing ( it must not use too much resource on the server and it might use current computers resourse )? I found somethings about x-servers on internet which i dont quite understand.

Please tell me what exactly i have to do.

Thanking You all
 
Old 07-29-2006, 03:34 AM   #2
spooon
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I don't understand any of this. What are you trying to run? On what computer? Remotely or locally? If remotely, what computer are you connecting from? What OS is running on the above computers? Do you understand how X works?
 
Old 07-29-2006, 03:58 AM   #3
acid_kewpie
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unrelated to networking. moved to Linux - Newbie
 
Old 07-29-2006, 07:35 AM   #4
kittaanna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spooon
I don't understand any of this. What are you trying to run? On what computer? Remotely or locally? If remotely, what computer are you connecting from? What OS is running on the above computers? Do you understand how X works?
I am trying to run remotely
I think the server is on FC3
I connecting from windows though telnet.
I dont really understand how X works(i know it is sort of server )

What i was trying to say i want to run xemacs,ddd etc on this sort of set up. Of course administrator should not understand that i am doing this( if possible )
Should i install some software for it on windows?

currently if i start any of this i get the message
'could not start x'

Last edited by kittaanna; 07-29-2006 at 07:42 AM.
 
Old 07-29-2006, 07:45 AM   #5
Nylex
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You should connect to the Linux machine via SSH and then you can forward graphical programs to the Windows machine. You'll need an X server for Windows (Cygwin/X, Hummingbird Exceed are two examples (the latter is a commercial one, though)).

Since this is a Windows question, it should really be in General.
 
Old 07-29-2006, 07:50 AM   #6
myates1980
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittaanna
I am trying to run remotely
I think the server is on FC3
I connecting from windows.
I dont really understand how X works(i know it is sort of server )

What i was trying to say i want to run xemacs,ddd etc on this sort of set up. Of course administrator should not understand that i am doing this( if possible )
Should i install some software for it on windows?

currently if i start any of this i get the message
'could not start x'
From what I understand you are trying to startx on the remote computer using telnet? I'm not sure if this can work unless you have the same version of Xorg or X11 on your windows box...client side at least.

Also the administrator of the FC3 box will always be able to tell what you're running on his server unless you want to go black hat on them and that isn't too cool on a trusted network; you could get in serious trouble with whatever authorities control the server.

Also the administrator probably doesn't allow a telnet user to execute startx...especially since he may have an instance of it running on his side. I'd just install Fedora on your own box if you want to play around with xemacs or ddd...but there is a windows version of emacs hacked somewhere if you just want to check out emacs.
 
Old 07-29-2006, 07:52 AM   #7
kittaanna
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nylex
You should connect to the Linux machine via SSH and then you can forward graphical programs to the Windows machine. You'll need an X server for Windows (Cygwin/X, Hummingbird Exceed are two examples (the latter is a commercial one, though)).
Hi I have ssh at our lab.
will just installing cygwin in our lab do my job
Can connect from cygwin symilar to telnet by typing the IP
address
and then start x using 'startx' command

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nylex
Since this is a Windows question, it should really be in General.
Sorry i did not know this

thanks for your time

Last edited by kittaanna; 07-29-2006 at 07:54 AM.
 
Old 07-29-2006, 08:01 AM   #8
kittaanna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myates1980
From what I understand you are trying to startx on the remote computer using telnet? I'm not sure if this can work unless you have the same version of Xorg or X11 on your windows box...client side at least.

Also the administrator of the FC3 box will always be able to tell what you're running on his server unless you want to go black hat on them and that isn't too cool on a trusted network; you could get in serious trouble with whatever authorities control the server.

Also the administrator probably doesn't allow a telnet user to execute startx...especially since he may have an instance of it running on his side. I'd just install Fedora on your own box if you want to play around with xemacs or ddd...but there is a windows version of emacs hacked somewhere if you just want to check out emacs.
I have fedora on my box so i want this to be in lab also
Administrator action may not be serious as this is not forbidden until now.
I think i will need to carry cygwin on CD where ever i go.
thanks
 
Old 07-30-2006, 09:33 PM   #9
gd2shoe
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kittaanna, do NOT use startx while remotely logged it. That command is only for those who are sitting at the computer they are accessing. X11 is a program that provides a drawing surface to other programs. To emphasize, you don't WANT that drawing surface on the server. What you want is the drawing surface on your computer, and the programs on the server to connect to your computer for all their drawing needs.

Installing linux on your own machine is probably the easiest way to go (and where you will learn the most), but installing an X11 server on your computer may allow the programs running on the server to talk to you. I will assume that this is either on your home computer/laptop or that you have permission for whatever lab you are in.

I recommend cygwin. It is a unix/linux like environment that runs in windows. It includes an X server. If you start the X11 server that comes with cygwin (assuming you tell it to install X11) then you can log into the server using ssh, and hope that the administrator has setup sshd to allow "X11 forwarding". If he has, you can fire up any X11 programs you want to, and they will magically be connected to the X11 server running on your computer.
 
Old 07-31-2006, 10:57 AM   #10
kittaanna
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by gd2shoe
kittaanna, do NOT use startx while remotely logged it. That command is only for those who are sitting at the computer they are accessing. X11 is a program that provides a drawing surface to other programs. To emphasize, you don't WANT that drawing surface on the server. What you want is the drawing surface on your computer, and the programs on the server to connect to your computer for all their drawing needs.

Installing linux on your own machine is probably the easiest way to go (and where you will learn the most), but installing an X11 server on your computer may allow the programs running on the server to talk to you. I will assume that this is either on your home computer/laptop or that you have permission for whatever lab you are in.

I recommend cygwin. It is a unix/linux like environment that runs in windows. It includes an X server. If you start the X11 server that comes with cygwin (assuming you tell it to install X11) then you can log into the server using ssh, and hope that the administrator has setup sshd to allow "X11 forwarding". If he has, you can fire up any X11 programs you want to, and they will magically be connected to the X11 server running on your computer.

Hi thanks for advising me.
I think I will drop this Idea.
I will ask the administrators to install cygwin all computers if possible.
I am doing this because many of my friends dont have any idea of power which modern day Linux programs give
According to them Linux is only gdb and vi( ofcourse these are powerfull in their own ways. I like gdb any way)which current telnet in our lab offers.
 
Old 07-31-2006, 05:47 PM   #11
spooon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittaanna
Hi thanks for advising me.
I think I will drop this Idea.
I will ask the administrators to install cygwin all computers if possible.
I am doing this because many of my friends dont have any idea of power which modern day Linux programs give
According to them Linux is only gdb and vi( ofcourse these are powerfull in their own ways. I like gdb any way)which current telnet in our lab offers.
I think I remember that Cygwin can be installed without Administrator privileges. (Why should it need Administrator?)

Also, Xming is the same X server as Cygwin/X but without needing Cygwin.
 
Old 08-01-2006, 12:46 AM   #12
gd2shoe
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If you're trying to show off Linux, try passing out live-CD's such as Knoppix! Knoppix is an awesome way to showcase linux and what it can do. Just boot off the CD, and away you go.

Knoppix is a full Debian installation that doesn't run off the hard drive. Instead, it runs off the CD and a ramdisk. It is a bit slower because the system needs to be read and uncompressed from the CD. It boots (by default) into a graphical interface (X11 with KDE). It comes with many development tools, open office, and firefox, etc.
 
Old 08-01-2006, 07:44 AM   #13
kittaanna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gd2shoe
If you're trying to show off Linux, try passing out live-CD's such as Knoppix! Knoppix is an awesome way to showcase linux and what it can do. Just boot off the CD, and away you go.

Knoppix is a full Debian installation that doesn't run off the hard drive. Instead, it runs off the CD and a ramdisk. It is a bit slower because the system needs to be read and uncompressed from the CD. It boots (by default) into a graphical interface (X11 with KDE). It comes with many development tools, open office, and firefox, etc.
I have never seen Knoppix.
Will try to get the live cd from somewhere
Thanks for telling me
An oppotunity to try out something newer
 
Old 08-01-2006, 03:46 PM   #14
gd2shoe
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Cool Getting Knoppix

I usually download it from www.knoppix.net; The official english site is at http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html .

The download is just under 700 MB (the maximum capacity of a CD) and will need to be burned to disk by a program that understands .iso files (most cd burning software will do). You can alternatively order the disks from a number of places. The newest version right now is 5.0.1 . Bear in mind that there are both English and German versions. The english downloads end in en.iso, the German end in de.iso .
 
Old 08-01-2006, 04:40 PM   #15
PingFloyd
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I think it's great that you want to introduce all your school chums to Linux. I think your best bet is a live CD like mentioned. At least until you feel comfortable that you may feel you want to install it onto your computer.

If I were you, I would take things a step further and maybe start up a Linux user group or club at your school. It's a great way for people to share their ideas with each other and help each other learn together. Not only that, but they're great in the all of the friends and people you end up networking with.

Another option would be to look and see if their is an existing user group in your area. You may find that you want to attend one. However, you may find that you may eventually want to have geared more toward other students getting together.

Anyway, the main point I wanted to make is that networking is a very powerful thing and that it sounds like you're in an environment that it would be real ideal to tap into that.
 
  


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