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Old 04-07-2009, 01:44 PM   #1
sittykitty
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Run CD Command?


I turned autorun off on my laptop, and when I did the swap thing with Vista, I guess the file was transfered here too. I'm trying to install the cd for a new printer, but auto run is off, and I don't know how to run a CD in Linux. Can anyone help?

Sorry, I did a few searches, and everything that comes up is about running linux live. Thanks!
 
Old 04-07-2009, 01:52 PM   #2
MasterC
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Hello,

Typically in Linux you don't use the CD that comes with your printer. The distributions I've used all provide the web interface for CUPS management. Fire up your favorite browser and type:
http://localhost:631

If you get the CUPS admin page you can setup your printer there.

Good luck!

-Chad
 
Old 04-07-2009, 01:55 PM   #3
Didier Spaier
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You usually don't need to "run" a CD in Linux, that is to say start a program (usually an installer) automatically.

And probably the drivers on you CD won't be useful on Linux anyway.

So please tell us first the exact brand and model of your printer, then hopefully we will be able to help you install it.
 
Old 04-07-2009, 01:57 PM   #4
Robhogg
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First, do you need the disk? What type of printer is it?

Linux comes pre-loaded with the drivers for many models - just try clicking "New Printer" from System > Administration > Printers.

If not, you can try the disk. The auto-setup facility isn't going to work, because it will be intended for Windows. However, you can open the disk in Nautilus (file manager) and look for Linux drivers on it. Look for a "README" file or similar for instructions.

If the manufacturer doesn't support Linux, you could also try the Linux Foundation's Open Printing project.

Lastly - autorun - no,no,no,no! Among the many things I immediately turn off when installing Windows. Makes things easy for the user, but even easier for the virus writer.
 
Old 04-07-2009, 02:03 PM   #5
sittykitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterC View Post
Hello,

Typically in Linux you don't use the CD that comes with your printer. The distributions I've used all provide the web interface for CUPS management. Fire up your favorite browser and type:
http://localhost:631

If you get the CUPS admin page you can setup your printer there.

Good luck!

-Chad
eek! I'm not familiar with CUPS. I just searched the site here: http://www.cups.org/ppd.php?L and it saihttp://www.cups.org/ppd.php?L no drivers found.

This is a HP Photosmart C4500 All-in-one series. Since it's wireless, I also have to configure the SSID etc, too. geez...
 
Old 04-07-2009, 02:11 PM   #6
sittykitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robhogg View Post
First, do you need the disk? What type of printer is it?

Linux comes pre-loaded with the drivers for many models - just try clicking "New Printer" from System > Administration > Printers.

If not, you can try the disk. The auto-setup facility isn't going to work, because it will be intended for Windows. However, you can open the disk in Nautilus (file manager) and look for Linux drivers on it. Look for a "README" file or similar for instructions.

If the manufacturer doesn't support Linux, you could also try the Linux Foundation's Open Printing project.

Lastly - autorun - no,no,no,no! Among the many things I immediately turn off when installing Windows. Makes things easy for the user, but even easier for the virus writer.
Yeah, I just officially learned about autorun a week ago, and shut it off for that very reason.

In new printer, under AppSocket/HP JetDirect, to the side it says
Host:
Port number:
 
Old 04-07-2009, 02:15 PM   #7
MasterC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sittykitty View Post
eek! I'm not familiar with CUPS. I just searched the site here: http://www.cups.org/ppd.php?L and it saihttp://www.cups.org/ppd.php?L no drivers found.

This is a HP Photosmart C4500 All-in-one series. Since it's wireless, I also have to configure the SSID etc, too. geez...
The printer should connect to your wireless network, unless you are trying to do ad-hoc networking (which I've never played with). Once it's connected to your network there is nothing special you need to do that is different than any other network printer.

In the CUPS web interface you would use the IP of the printer:

socket://192.168.1.30

If you don't have any specific PPD for your printer when you go hunting for one in the next screen, you can select the generic PS and use it until you find something better. Typically that's it.

Good luck!

-Chad
 
Old 04-07-2009, 02:20 PM   #8
MasterC
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Depending on your distro, you may need to install the hplip package. It will contain the recommended driver for your printer (http://www.openprinting.org)

-Chad
 
Old 04-07-2009, 02:52 PM   #9
Didier Spaier
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And don't worry there is a driver for your printer in any recent CUPS installation. I just checked that.
 
Old 04-07-2009, 02:56 PM   #10
sittykitty
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Yeah, I went to the HP site, and they're nice... they have the linux driver support, so I was able to get that at least. I am trying to use this ad hoc thingy (as it is mentioned in the book). For some reason, my laptop on Ubuntu 8.10 had wifi problems with the internet. I found a way to fix it, but I'm totally lost on how to configure this printer.

I was able to print up a sheet with the mac address etc, but all this stuff is confusing. I'm not sure what all goes where in the Ubuntu wireless set up. it is showing up in my list of networks, but it won't connect on it's own. I tried simply printing sans USB and that didn't work either.
 
Old 04-07-2009, 03:02 PM   #11
MasterC
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I'm not sure on your specific situation, but typically you have something like a wireless router (maybe even running DD-WRT ) which your wireless devices all connect to. Once they are connected, networking them should be no different than it would be for a wired network...

So, eating the elephant one bite at a time:
Do you have a wireless router or wireless access point through which your devices communicate on your network?

If not, you'll want to first setup your printer to get on your network (whether that is through your Ubuntu machine, through a router or through some other machine in ad-hoc mode). Once it's on the network the same thing above applies. Just make sure your printer is on the network first (through whatever means that takes) and *then* proceed to setting it up.

-Chad
 
Old 04-07-2009, 03:51 PM   #12
sittykitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterC View Post
I'm not sure on your specific situation, but typically you have something like a wireless router (maybe even running DD-WRT ) which your wireless devices all connect to. Once they are connected, networking them should be no different than it would be for a wired network...

So, eating the elephant one bite at a time:
Do you have a wireless router or wireless access point through which your devices communicate on your network?

If not, you'll want to first setup your printer to get on your network (whether that is through your Ubuntu machine, through a router or through some other machine in ad-hoc mode). Once it's on the network the same thing above applies. Just make sure your printer is on the network first (through whatever means that takes) and *then* proceed to setting it up.

-Chad
Well, the house is currently de-networked, so to speak. The desktops connected by ethernet, and only one laptop in use right now. (I'll have the other up and running shortly. The two laptops and one of the desktops will share this printer.) I have AT&T Uverse, so all TV boxes and computers connect to it with ethernet cords or wirelessly.

But, no, I don't have a home network set up for the computers to share files, etc. I had security concerns, when I had it that way before. And honestly, that was set up through Windows XP Pro... lol... by dumb luck.

The other laptop will be running Edubuntu for the kids. This one is Ubuntu 8.10/Vista. The desktop for this printer will be Ubuntu 8.10/XP Pro... I can't set anything up from there yet because it's currently dead, and I'll be spending the next week rebuilding it... rather building a new one.

So, I guess the question now is... where or how do I input the info the printer printed out for me? For example, I have no clue what a BSSID is, and there isn't one listed on the sheet for the printer. Under IPv4, I haven't a clue what to select (manual, link-local only, shared to other computers... I'm pretty sure it's not DHCP). I've tried it with all of the other three, but no luck. Maybe because I need the BSSID?

This, of course, is all under "Network Connections" -> "Wireless"

It's listed under "Wireless Networks" right along with all of my neighbors etc, but I can't connect to it in that way.

Last edited by sittykitty; 04-07-2009 at 04:04 PM.
 
Old 04-07-2009, 04:20 PM   #13
MasterC
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Hmmm...

When you say "connect to it with ethernet cords or wirelessly" what is it? If they are connecting to a router, chances are they are networked (whether or not you are sharing the resources of the systems isn't what I mean when I say that term, I simply mean they can communicate with each other over TCP/UDP).

If they cannot communicate (when you look at their IP and try to ping, do you get a response or a timeout? If you get a timeout then...) then you will probably need to set it up ad-hoc which is what it sounds like you are trying to do.

If that's the case:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WifiDocs/Adhoc

Really I don't have a lot of experience with setting up an ad-hoc network as I've always had the convenience of just throwing in a wireless router. I've setup a PAN over Bluetooth which I suspect is a similar idea. Basically your devices just broadcast out to each other. Another option might be to turn your laptop into a wireless router. It sounds much cooler and considerably more complex than it really is, but this would allow you to "network" your devices through a single entity and allow them to share their resources (which from the printer's perspective is the ability to print). It does require you to do things you wouldn't normally do in Linux though, and if you are just wanting to put in a CD and have your printer work it probably is the least desirable option.

If you have 30 bucks my suggestion is to instead pickup a wireless router and go from there. I'm a fan of the wrt54g (and then throw dd-wrt on it ) but I've noticed they are dying off, so maybe a wrt54gl if you can find one of those.

Good luck!

-Chad
 
Old 04-07-2009, 04:57 PM   #14
sittykitty
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I guess it is a router. LOL To the best of my knowledge, the devices aren't configured to communicate with one another. However, the TV boxes, considering they all share a list of recorded programs, must share some sort of memory at some point. Where or how, I wouldn't know. I've never pinged anything before

As far as turning my computer into a router, maybe when I learn more about properly securing my computers. I'm super fresh to Linux. Come to think of it... there is a way to ummm... I guess create a server within the router config. Like, an option to allow sharing of xy&z.files. I don't know... it seems weird. The printer is coming up as though it is a network or router itself. It has it's own SSID, IP, etc.

But that's for trying to help.
 
Old 04-07-2009, 05:05 PM   #15
MasterC
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The printer is likely set in ad-hoc mode, which would indeed show up as a wireless device you can connect to.

If you want to tinker, fire up 2 machines and look at their IP's. From one machine try to ping the other. In linux open up a terminal and type:
/sbin/ifconfig

The IP will show up next to a device like wlan0, eth0 or something like that, anything but lo hopefully.

In windows click Start, Run and type cmd In the black box type:
ipconfig

Now that you have the 2 command lines open and the 2 IP's, from one of the boxes type:
ping 1.2.3.4

Where 1.2.3.4 is the IP of the other system on the network.

If you can ping it, they are networked.

-Chad
 
  


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