LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-22-2008, 05:34 PM   #1
guanajuatense2008
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Root login in Fedora 10


I'm absolutely a Linux newbie. I'm so excited after installing Fedora 10. My user account, rather than the root, works fine. Unfortunate, I can't log into the root even though I mistype nothing (surely not caplock-related problems). After several unsuccessful root-login's, I wipe out the whole HD and reinstall Fedora once again with the same root password. Currently, there hasn't been any successful root-login, and I am looking for an clue what I have done wrong. Thanks for your help.
 
Old 12-22-2008, 05:38 PM   #2
amani
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Kolkata, India
Distribution: Debian 64-bit GNU/Linux, Kubuntu64, Fedora QA, Slackware,
Posts: 2,766

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Root login is disabled in the Graphical desktops. If you want to do system tasks. Simply open a Konsole/terminal and do

#su
<root passwd>
Now you are root in this terminal

#yum update
 
Old 12-22-2008, 06:03 PM   #3
Hitboxx
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2006
Location: India
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 1,562
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 61
As said above, root Graphical logins are disabled in Fedora 10. However for tasks that require you to be root in a graphical mode, I typically follow this method.

Add a custom application launcher button to the Gnome panel, set type as Application in Terminal, give some name, and 'sudo nautilus --no-desktop' as the command. Then clicking the button will open a terminal for your user password upon which you will be able to open Nautilus as root. Once you are here, you can do all typical graphical things like creation, deletion, copy, cut, paste, etc..

*Note: However, for this to work, you should have added your user name to the sudoers file beforehand.
 
Old 12-22-2008, 09:36 PM   #4
lazlow
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,362

Rep: Reputation: 172Reputation: 172
You want to be careful to understand the difference between su and su -(su space dash). su gives you root's permissions but the user's path. su - gives you root's permissions and root's path. If you use just su you often get the response of blah blah not found. Personally I use su - exclusively to avoid any issues. As far as nautilus goes, you can su - , then type nautilus and you have root's nautilus(the same for any tool).
 
Old 12-23-2008, 12:59 AM   #5
guanajuatense2008
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thank a lot for your help.
 
Old 12-23-2008, 01:20 AM   #6
mk27
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2008
Distribution: fedora, gentoo, ubuntu
Posts: 148

Rep: Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitboxx View Post
As said above, root Graphical logins are disabled in Fedora 10.
If you boot or switch into runlevel 3 (non-GUI), login as root ("non-graphically"), and then startx, you can use the X desktop as root on FC10.

This is a very very very stupid "security feature". Eventually fedora should just send a team of people over to pick up your computer since you are not responsible enough to use it
 
Old 03-10-2009, 03:13 PM   #7
fedix
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Mpumalanga, South Africa
Distribution: Fedora / CentOS 5 / Ubuntu
Posts: 103

Rep: Reputation: 17
Angry

Quote:
Originally Posted by mk27 View Post
This is a very very very stupid "security feature". Eventually fedora should just send a team of people over to pick up your computer since you are not responsible enough to use it
Agree! Are Fedora becoming like Microsoft! Please don't!!!!!
 
Old 06-16-2009, 05:43 PM   #8
niels-da-piels
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
You can enable graphical login for root quite easy: edit both /etc/pam.d/gdm and /etc/pam.d/gdm-password and comment out the line containing "!= root".

greets
Niels
 
Old 10-26-2009, 12:14 PM   #9
jcipale
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2008
Posts: 9

Rep: Reputation: 0
Niels,

What if your default window manager is KDM? DO the same rules apply for this as well as GDM? I am no big fan of the Gnome Window Manager and always install/run KDE. But that is just my preference.

Thanks in advance,

Joe
 
Old 10-26-2009, 01:31 PM   #10
ronlau9
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: In front of my LINUX OR MAC BOX
Distribution: Mandriva 2009 X86_64 suse 11.3 X86_64 Centos X86_64 Debian X86_64 Linux MInt 86_64 OS X
Posts: 2,369

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcipale View Post
Niels,

What if your default window manager is KDM? DO the same rules apply for this as well as GDM? I am no big fan of the Gnome Window Manager and always install/run KDE. But that is just my preference.

Thanks in advance,

Joe
Yes it apply for GNOME
 
Old 10-26-2009, 02:39 PM   #11
John VV
LQ Muse
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Location: A2 area Mi.
Posts: 16,827

Rep: Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409Reputation: 2409
why do people drag up old posts !!!!!!

this IS NOT a NEW change gnome and fedora started to block root GUI login in fedora 8
 
Old 10-26-2009, 02:53 PM   #12
lazlow
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,362

Rep: Reputation: 172Reputation: 172
It did not start until F9.

If you look back there has been a post to this thread about every 4 months. Personally I would not put that into the category of dragging up old posts. Now if there was a year or more between posts, then I would put it in that category.
 
Old 10-26-2009, 03:52 PM   #13
MBybee
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Location: wherever I can make a living
Distribution: PC-BSD / FreeBSD / Debian / Ubuntu / Win7 / OpenVMS
Posts: 438

Rep: Reputation: 57
This general theme keeps coming back. Both Gnome and KDE have been moving away from permitting default root logins for a long time.

It's non-trivial to modify the config file to fix this, and has been discussed on linux questions repeatedly. It's not even distro-specific, really.

It's not that they should come and pick up your machine, it's that the users demand security and ease of use. If you are (or want to be) a power user, do some research and become one.

Linux has dropped a lot of 'unix-isms' to become more like Windows in order to gain market share. That's generally regarded as good. One of these is the crutch of using root to do everything. Some things still don't work properly via gksudo and the like, but they are trying.
 
Old 10-26-2009, 06:56 PM   #14
chrism01
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Sydney
Distribution: Centos 6.8, Centos 5.10
Posts: 17,241

Rep: Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325Reputation: 2325
Quote:
One of these is the crutch of using root to do everything.
What???
One of the points of *nix is that only system services and the like should run as root. Apps should not, unlike MS....
Linux has not dropped *nixisms.
Ubuntu has decided to be non-std and automatically give the first non-root user full root powers via sudo.
That's not what sudo was invented for.
 
Old 10-27-2009, 01:17 AM   #15
MBybee
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2009
Location: wherever I can make a living
Distribution: PC-BSD / FreeBSD / Debian / Ubuntu / Win7 / OpenVMS
Posts: 438

Rep: Reputation: 57
I'm going to have to disagree with you there - many actual Unix systems (like AIX, Solaris, HPUX, Tru64) still require the root user to perform the wide variety of daily tasks.

Solaris, for example - restarting a print queue or starting and stopping printing entirely requires root.
Managing space requires root.
Managing network interfaces requires root.
Managing hosts files and any form of config requires root.
Installing most system-wide software requires root.
Changing file ownership frequently requires root.
Configuring X (if used at all) requires root.
User management (even your own) requires root. Can't go tweaking your default shell without it.
Even network tools like ping can require root depending on the age of the OS.

These are not bad things, per se. They are just a holdover from an older mindset. A mindset where users stay in user directories and do user stuff, and the admins use root as needed for system config and system management. Now we use sudo and vanity accounts a lot more, but this is imported from the Linux universe.

The newest line of thinking is that root shouldn't be even running services if at all possible. OpenBSD is working on rootless X, for example. Apache 2 works hard to run in non-priv mode for almost everything. Jails are becoming very popular for running services.

Ubuntu does follow the Apple tradition of giving the initial user all(all) for sudo (or maybe it's Apple following Ubuntu or whatever).

This is better than nothing - and better than the PC-BSD default where the user is constantly bombarded with prompts for the root user's password to do any of the above tasks. Default behavior of BSD, for example, is that a user can't even run su, because they typically aren't in the wheel group.

Linux has made great strides in becoming more user friendly. If you want a comparison, go install an actual Unix like Solaris 8 or AIX 5 on a machine and knock yourself out. Most of the big Unix systems are actually starting to clone concepts from F/OSS projects like Linux and *BSD, which is making life a lot easier all around. Tools like lsof, gzip, ssh, and sudo are fantastic, and I know that I am grateful for them whenever I find them on a big box.

Last edited by MBybee; 10-27-2009 at 01:20 AM. Reason: clarifying that SSH isn't from Linux ;)
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fresh Fedora 8 Installation Hangs after Root Login threefivezero Linux - Newbie 11 11-07-2009 06:53 AM
Root login on Fedora 10 danie1 Linux - General 2 01-22-2009 05:30 PM
Forgotten Password of root in Fedora 8, Cant login, need it badly :( confulity Linux - General 3 09-19-2008 12:18 AM
Fedora Core 3: How do I enable remote root login? xunil321 Fedora - Installation 2 09-16-2005 06:43 AM
Fedora core 1 Cant login as root ? Evilgrin Fedora - Installation 1 03-26-2004 11:59 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:48 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration