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Old 12-28-2006, 10:55 AM   #1
yogaboy
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Londinium
Distribution: CentOs 4, OSX Tiger
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restrict access to root /


Hi,

I've just noticed that as any user on my CentOS box I can run
cd /

and I can access the root file system. Obviously accessing the other dirs within it isn't possible without the correct permissions, but this is a worry to me.

I don't know how to stop this, and because of the root (account) = root (filesystem) in the eyes of Google I can't find any help on this.

I appreciate your consideration on this, it seems pretty important (to me).
 
Old 12-28-2006, 11:01 AM   #2
jstephens84
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Even though you can access the / filesystem try to create a directory. it should fail as a normal user unless you have changed your user permissions on the directory. I don't suggest taking permissions away from users on the / filesystem. They need access to that.
 
Old 12-28-2006, 11:03 AM   #3
yogaboy
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ok, thanks. I will try to be less anxious!
 
Old 12-29-2006, 01:31 AM   #4
Prostetnic_Jeltz
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Hi yogaboy -

note there is a very big difference between read and write permissions - and that permissions on a parent directory affect its child directories. it is obviously crucial that non-root users be able to read dir's below / -- in short, I agree with jstephens

here is a nice link that explains it well:

https://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/...ownership.html

 
Old 12-31-2006, 09:17 AM   #5
yogaboy
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thanks. I suppose I was a little rattled by the fact that they can see the filesystem, even parts to which they have no access. Obviously the preference would be for them to be unaware of these other bits, but I fully understand that to take away permissions to / would most likely cascade to other parts of the system.
 
  


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