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Old 09-22-2013, 12:35 AM   #1
rpmacaspac
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restore my rescent desktop before yum update


i have rhel6 running on my system but my repos are centos base. i only update what i need to ensure that my background is still base on rhel 6. Last night i accidentally type yum update -y and so my login background and boot image became centos. I want to bring it back to rhel6 and Im thinking that if I restore my system status before the update then i could bring its before state.
 
Old 09-22-2013, 02:39 AM   #2
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpmacaspac View Post
Im thinking that if I restore my system status before the update then i could bring its before state.
How do you plan to do that? I use dpkg-based distros rather than rpm-based, so I don't know much about yum, but do rpm-based systems give you some kind of rollback capability (similar to Microsoft Windows "restore points")? Of course you can uninstall packages, but that is not the same as what I'm calling a "rollback" here. To the best of my knowlege, "rollback" means "restore your system from backups". I'd be interested to learn if Linux has some kind of system rollback. Not that I think I'd every use it, but just so that I know that such a thing exists. To the best of my knowledge, it doesn't.

Of course, if you restore your system from a previous backup, before the changes were made by the update, then things would be back to the way they were at the time that backup was made.

Last edited by haertig; 09-22-2013 at 02:40 AM.
 
Old 09-27-2013, 11:00 AM   #3
rpmacaspac
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Quote:
I'd be interested to learn if Linux has some kind of system rollback
i know there is rollback feauture included in yum. repackage
 
Old 09-27-2013, 11:19 AM   #4
TenTenths
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpmacaspac View Post
i know there is rollback feauture included in yum. repackage

== RHEL6/CentOS6 ==
Near the end of 2009 (or thereabouts) a 'history' command was added to yum. The history command allows an admin to access detailed information on the history of yum transactions that have been run on a system.


Yum started keeping a sqlite db of the information from each and every transaction. The history is organized by transaction id. Each time you perform a 'yum' command which changes your system pkgs in someway the history db is updated with this information.


The yum history dbs are normally found in /var/lib/yum/history/

Commands
yum history list [all] [pkgname...] [transaction_id...] a table of the transactions. It takes two optional arguments. A package name/glob and a transaction id number.
- For example:
- yum history list zsh will return a table of all the transactions where the pkg 'zsh' was modified in some way.
- yum history list 1 2 10 will return a table of transactions 1, 2 and 10.
- yum history list all will list every transaction in the history db. This could be A LOT.
- with no arguments it will list the most recent 20 transactions.

yum history info [pkgname...] [transaction_id ...]
- superset of that 'list' takes but provides detailed information on the transaction. You may best use this piped to 'less'. You can also see a "merged history" of some transactions. For example:
- yum history info 1..4 will show a single transactions for what would have happened if the first four transactions had been one single transaction.
- with no arguments it will display info on the most recent transaction.

yum history summary [pkgname...] [transaction_id ...]
- create a summary of what the transactions have done.
- with no arguments it will present a total summary of the current history database.
- example:
yum history summary glibc
Code:
        Login user                 | Time                | Action(s)        | Altered 
        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        seth vidal <skvidal>       | Last 3 months       | E, I, O, U       |     1873
        seth vidal <skvidal>       | Last 6 months       | I, U             |      154
        seth vidal <skvidal>       | Last year           | Update           |       16
The first row of this chart says that in the last 3 months transactions involving the glibc pkg were performed which modified 1873 pkgs and involved Erase, Install, Obsolete and Update operations.

yum history package-list [pkgname...]
- show a list of what happened to a particular package, or packages.
- For example:
# yum history packages-list yum
Code:
        ID     | Action(s)      | Package                                              
        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            58 | Updated        | yum-3.2.28-3.fc13.noarch                             
            58 | Update         |     3.2.28-4.fc13.noarch                             
            39 | Updated        | yum-3.2.27-4.fc13.noarch                             
            39 | Update         |     3.2.28-3.fc13.noarch                             
             1 | Install        | yum-3.2.27-4.fc13.noarch
yum history undo [transaction_id|'last']
this will attempt to 'undo' what the specified transaction did. In many cases this is possible, but in some cases the packages yum needs to downgrade to are no longer available anywhere and therefore an undo will not succeed.

yum history redo [transaction_id|'last']
this will attempt to perform the exact same transaction specified. This does NOT do a 'reinstall' but simply performing the same transaction again.

yum history new
creates a new yum history db, saving the old one. This command is only to let you keep the size of any single yum history database down in size. When you create a new history db the older transactions will not be accessible unless you move the new history db out of the way. You should rarely ever need to run this command.
 
Old 09-27-2013, 01:38 PM   #5
John VV
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Quote:
i have rhel6 running on my system but my repos are centos base.
you are using a unlicensed and unregistered install of RHEL 6

-- forget it , you will need to BUY the required license / support contract
the STD 1 year is $ 299 USD per year
-- for a single desktop install
https://www.redhat.com/apps/store/desktop/

or do a FULL migration over to CentOS 6.4

BUT
RHEL6 must be already fully updated and the current RHEL6.4

if not
there is not guarantee that a migration will work

also there is no " role back" that is a Microsoft windows and the MS system registry concept

yum dose keep a history and you can undo installed rpms
You really can not reinstall the Redhat rpms from RedHat without a paid for license
you DO NOT have access to RHN to install them
 
  


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