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Old 01-10-2006, 02:52 PM   #16
jarod_123
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Thanks for the help haertig. I did plan to practice on the system I just installed because it was a rush job. I've been using RH for awhile and wanted to try other distros, and have found that there are much more stable ones out there. I'm a bit of a convert now that've changed distros.
 
Old 01-11-2006, 11:02 AM   #17
jarod_123
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Another thing I wanted to bring up, was how would I add more space to my already existing /usr or /home directory if I bought a new drive. I don't want to simply mount that directory to the new drive. Is it easier to just create a soft link(ln -s) to the new drive's directory that I create? what would be better?
 
Old 01-11-2006, 06:25 PM   #18
haertig
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I've been chewing on your questions here for a few minutes and I just can't figure out exactly what you're asking. Maybe you could rephrase things.

But trying to guess:
Quote:
...how would I add more space to my already existing /usr or /home directory if I bought a new drive...
If you're saying you want to mix your current non-LVM filesystems with LVM space on a new drive ... you can't. What you would have to do is COPY your existing /usr over to new space on the LVM drive and then REPLACE your current /usr with the newly copied one. After you've done this one-time conversion, the newly copied filesystem (on LVM) would be extendable via LVM commands after that. But I thought you were thinking of going for the "install from scratch" option anyway. No need to copy anything, just set things up as LVM from the get-go and install. I know with Debian this is an option during the initial install, I don't know about other distros.
Quote:
I don't want to simply mount that directory to the new drive. Is it easier to just create a soft link(ln -s) to the new drive's directory that I create? what would be better?
This is where you totally lost me. Maybe because my mind's thinking you'd be reinstalling from scratch, and you're talking about keeping your current install and LVM-inizing it on the fly? I hate to admit I'm too stupid to figure out what you're asking, but I am!
 
Old 01-12-2006, 08:16 AM   #19
jarod_123
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I do intend to just to a complete re-install, but I was just wondering if people actually create symlinks in the real world(production environment) to make it seem to users that the capacity of the drive is huge.(Since symlinks can traverse to different filesystems and partitions) It just seems easy to do for sysadmins to do on the fly.
 
Old 01-12-2006, 10:44 AM   #20
haertig
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I use symlinks all the time. To simplify things for myself. I don't know why you'd want to make users think a drive is bigger than it is or why individual drive size would even matter to anyone other than the sysadm. All the production systems I work with have many many individual harddrives, most of them off on a SAN. Symlinks abound, and not just to point things off to a different drive, although that case does happen occassionally.

On my home system, I have /opt as a seperately mounted filesystem. Then I have /usr/local symlinked to /opt. Because on my system usage patterns for these two areas is almost synonymous. These directories/ are used to mostly keep locally compiled/installed stuff that I want to keep seperate from the more system level stuff in /usr.
 
  


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