LinuxQuestions.org
Go Job Hunting at the LQ Job Marketplace
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 06-03-2011, 04:04 AM   #1
glock356
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Posts: 34

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Smile Replacing XP with Ubuntu


Hello!
This is my first post here.
Please exuse me for my poor english.

I am trying to install Ubuntu to replace XP.
I have a 200 GB disk with two partitions - 40 GB partition C with Windows and win apps installed and 160 GB partition named F for data storage.
On partiton C is cca 25 GB free space, on F is cca 20 GB free space.
There is another 160 GB disk(D) with Less than 5 GB free also used for data storage.

When i am try to instal Ubuntu to replace XP, instalation informed me there be used ALL 200 GB disk!
I stopped instalation there because i be feared to loose all data on partition F.

How to manage instalation to use ONLY C partition(40 GB)?

Thank You for answers

Last edited by glock356; 06-03-2011 at 04:05 AM. Reason: Wrong Title
 
Old 06-03-2011, 04:26 AM   #2
eSelix
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Location: Wroclaw, Poland
Distribution: Arch, Kubuntu
Posts: 1,245

Rep: Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309
First I recommend you to make a backup of your data. If you do mistake during installation you lost all your data, I see that this happen often.

About your question: you need one free partition at least. Two systems cannot coexist on one partition. Use Partition Magic to repartition your drive and make free space to new partition. I think it is possible to install Ubuntu on your data partition, but you must remember to not format this partition if you do not want lost this data. During installation when installator ask you about using the whole disk, you can select option to manual partitioning, and there select which partition to use as your root signed as character "/".

I recommend to buying another drive as they are cheap today. Or if you only want to try Ubuntu, installing VirtualBox on Windows and perform installation on his virtual disk, what is safe.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-03-2011, 04:55 AM   #3
goupixg6
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Bordeaux, France
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
first rule is: think murphy's law and backup your data !!!!

well well well.

lets make it clear :

Hard disk 1
C: 40 GB - system
F: 160 GB - data
hard disk 2
D: 160 GB - data

facts are : you have 2 partitions on Hard disk 1
Basic linux systems need at least 3 partitions : a system one (which is called root), a swap one (which is quite like xp pagefile) and a data one (which is called /home/)

Windows writes in NTFS stuff while linux uses EXT2, EXT3, EXT4, REISERFS etc.
Ubuntu can read and write NTFS stuff, but it remains Windows stuff.

it's gonna be quite headbreaking and "possibly unsafe" (which means no safe at all) to play with partitions and filesystems.
don't even think of resizing and/or converting before you backed up your data since a single mistype can ruin everything.
then see this : http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html

at your own risks!

Last edited by goupixg6; 06-03-2011 at 04:57 AM. Reason: just used center code :/
 
Old 06-03-2011, 05:28 AM   #4
EDDY1
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Mar 2010
Location: Oakland,Ca
Distribution: wins7, Debian wheezy
Posts: 6,219

Rep: Reputation: 578Reputation: 578Reputation: 578Reputation: 578Reputation: 578Reputation: 578
Right-click MyComputer click on manage
go to disk management and check which partitions are on which disk, before you do anything.
 
Old 06-03-2011, 05:29 AM   #5
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Hanover, Germany
Distribution: Main: Gentoo Others: What fits the task
Posts: 15,652
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095Reputation: 4095
Quote:
Originally Posted by goupil_g6 View Post
Basic linux systems need at least 3 partitions : a system one (which is called root), a swap one (which is quite like xp pagefile) and a data one (which is called /home/)
Were did you get this wrong information? A basic linux system needs only one partition, the system partition (called /-partition). Swap space is highly recommended, but you can choose to either use a swap-partition (I would recommend that for a newbie) or a swap-file on an existing partition (or no swap at all).


@glock356: Follow the advice from the posters before me, back up your data first. Then, when the Ubuntu installer comes to partitioning, choose the manual option. If you are in the partitioner, delete your old 40GB system partition and set up a swap partition (with 1GB you should be on the save side, if you want to use hibernation make it at least as large as your amount of RAM) and give the rest to the new system partition.
 
Old 06-03-2011, 05:39 AM   #6
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,597
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046Reputation: 1046
Quote:
I think it is possible to install Ubuntu on your data partition, but you must remember to not format this partition if you do not want lost this data
Installing linux on fat/ntfs is not an optimal solution.

Quote:
Basic linux systems need at least 3 partitions
Well, that's not technically true. I never have a separate /home partition and if one has enough RAM and doesn't need to hibernate/suspend, they can do without the swap system.


You are saying that you want to REPLACE XP with Ubuntu. I'd suggest you initially dual boot XP and Ubuntu until you feel comfortable with linux, but if that's what you want, that's fine.

Remember that during the ubuntu installation you need to choose the right drive. Drives in linux have a different naming nomenclature, eg. /dev/sda1 = first partition of the first drive (sometimes it can still be /dev/hda1)
/dev/sda2 - the second partition of the first drive, etc.
/dev/sdb1 - the first partition of the second drive
/dev/sdb2 - the second partition of the second drive, etc.

It seems your installer has chosen the right partition (200GB). As it was mentioned in the previous post, you need to choose to MANUALLY configure partitions. That way you'll be able to choose which partition you want to install linux to.

OBVIOUSLY, MAKE A BACKUP BEFORE YOU DO THIS. IF YOU HAVE NEVER INSTALLED LINUX, IT MIGHT BE EASY TO LOSE YOUR DATA.

If you have any doubts, please ask.
 
Old 06-03-2011, 07:44 AM   #7
goupixg6
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Bordeaux, France
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Wink

Quote:
Were did you get this wrong information? A basic linux system needs only one partition, the system partition (called /-partition). Swap space is highly recommended, but you can choose to either use a swap-partition (I would recommend that for a newbie) or a swap-file on an existing partition (or no swap at all).
Quote:
Well, that's not technically true. I never have a separate /home partition and if one has enough RAM and doesn't need to hibernate/suspend, they can do without the swap system.
true x2 and my bad!
Wrote this to make it easier for the XP->Ubuntu movers to understand, cause Windows XP works quite like this, i didn't know whether base linux or basic linux was the best way to describe this common way of partitioning :/ Let's take the third way by writing "classic" or "typical".
 
Old 06-03-2011, 10:59 AM   #8
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714
I don't use a separate /home partition. The advantage is that it lets you keep your home directory intact even when you upgrade or install a new distro. The disadvantage is that if you mis-estimate how much space you will use, and fill up your / but still have a lot of space in /home (or vice versa), then you have to do repartitioning. It's your choice.

So if your current setup is like this:

Code:
/dev/sda:
  /dev/sda1: 40GB (NTFS)
  /dev/sda2: 160GB (NTFS)
/dev/sdb:
  /dev/sdb1: 160GB (NTFS)
, then my recommendation would be to repartition it like this:

Code:
/dev/sda:
  /dev/sda1: ???GB (ext4)
  /dev/sda2: ???GB (swap)
  /dev/sda3: 160GB (NTFS)
/dev/sdb:
  /dev/sdb1: 160GB (NTFS)
I used ??? since I don't know how much RAM you have, and because it depends on what kind of stuff you use the computer for. I would typically give almost as much swap as RAM if you have a lot of RAM, and a lot of swap if you have very little RAM.

Also I never used a separate non-/home partition to store my data, I personally don't understand how you can manage that easily, so I have no idea how you will use your /home.

Last edited by MTK358; 06-03-2011 at 11:02 AM.
 
Old 06-03-2011, 03:00 PM   #9
floppy_stuttgart
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Distribution: Tiny Core Linux 4.5.6, knoppix 6.7, antixM8.11, partedmagic, slitaz 3.0,PuppyLinux,Ubuntu 10.04
Posts: 545
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by glock356 View Post
Hello!
This is my first post here.
Please exuse me for my poor english.

I am trying to install Ubuntu to replace XP.
I have a 200 GB disk with two partitions - 40 GB partition C with Windows and win apps installed and 160 GB partition named F for data storage.
On partiton C is cca 25 GB free space, on F is cca 20 GB free space.
There is another 160 GB disk(D) with Less than 5 GB free also used for data storage.

When i am try to instal Ubuntu to replace XP, instalation informed me there be used ALL 200 GB disk!
I stopped instalation there because i be feared to loose all data on partition F.

How to manage instalation to use ONLY C partition(40 GB)?

Thank You for answers
install a linux on the ntfs partition.
please check www.tinycorelinux.com
and ask help there
it boots at a space-shuttle speed...
 
Old 06-03-2011, 03:04 PM   #10
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714Reputation: 714
Quote:
Originally Posted by floppy_stuttgart View Post
install a linux on the ntfs partition.
Why?

NTFS doesn't support Unix permissions (which screws up many of the core concepts of a Linux system and could cause problems), and it's easy and fast to reformat.

Last edited by MTK358; 06-03-2011 at 03:06 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ubuntu LiveCD from ext. HDD alongside Windows Owndapwn Linux - Newbie 18 02-20-2011 05:24 AM
Error msg on trying to install Ubuntu 10.4 alongside Windows ZombyWoof Ubuntu 2 01-28-2011 06:00 AM
I can't uninstal Ubuntu 9.01 alongside Win XP plang53271 Linux - Newbie 8 04-30-2010 11:59 PM
Ubuntu says disk is full installed alongside windows and... Dygital_Karma Linux - Laptop and Netbook 2 05-17-2009 11:21 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:51 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration