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Old 05-28-2006, 01:51 AM   #1
chitranjan
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Relation Between Kernel Version And Distribution Version


I want to know whether A particular version of linux kernel is specific to distribution of linux i.e if i want to work on linux kernel version 2.2.14 then how to know that which either FC3, FC2 OR red hat etc which version of their disrtibution i need to install .

i am using FEDORA CORE 3 , so can i simply download source code of 2.2.14 kernel version and install it to use it or i need to install seprate OS like RED HAT 6.1 which actually contain kernel version 2.2.14 ?

one more thing can i know vice versa i.e given the name of distribution like redhat 7.1,8.0 or 6.1 and know which kernel version they contain without actually installing them ?
 
Old 05-28-2006, 02:47 AM   #2
Simon Bridge
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The kernel version and distro version need not be related.
If you want to work on kernel 2.x.yz then download the source for this, stick it in a handy directory and go for it.

Goodness knows why you would want the 2.2.14 kernel - much of your hardware will fail to work. Work is desired in the 2.4 and 2.6 trees. Most folk choose to learn and work on the most recent unstable version they can get hold of.
 
Old 05-28-2006, 03:55 AM   #3
Electro
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Every Linux distribution version that comes out is actually perfecting the configuration of the previous version. Also its proprietary utilities are also perfected. A distribution like Gentoo is hard to state its version because it can be easily upgraded by the user.

I recommend using kernel version 2.6.x because it provides excellent performance from its scheduler and supports a wide variety of hardware. You could use kernel version 2.4.x but it lacks a good scheduler and it is limited in hardware. Using kernel version 2.2.x is very old but it could work better on very old systems. Not a lot developers that have a big project like Linux NTFS are supporting 2.2.x and 2.4.x kernels because these kernels are very different than 2.6.x kernels.
 
Old 05-28-2006, 04:07 AM   #4
MasterC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chitranjan
one more thing can i know vice versa i.e given the name of distribution like redhat 7.1,8.0 or 6.1 and know which kernel version they contain without actually installing them ?
The above points are great, but to directly answer your question, yes you can find out what kernel a particular version of a particular distro comes with *without* installing it. Using Fedora as an example, you head to a mirror that is close to you (or if you are like a lot of people, just go to redhat's mirror) and then follow the links down until you come to the version in question. We'll use FC4 for example:
You click the 'os', then Fedora, then RPMS directory to get here:

http://ftp.ussg.iu.edu/linux/fedora/...s/Fedora/RPMS/

As you can see, Fedora automatically redirected me to the iu.edu mirror, so that's a nicety that you won't always find.

In the RPMS directory, you should be able to find what kernel is offered.

Using the "find" function of your browser (in firefox press CTRL F), you will find this package (type kernel):
http://ftp.ussg.iu.edu/linux/fedora/...9_FC4.i586.rpm

So, FC4 originally came with 2.6.11 Then Fedora added their patch set, which brings you to the the -1.1369 added version.

Hopefully that's not too confusing, just trying to point out that you don't need to install a slew of distros to find one that has the kernel you are looking for.

HTH

Cool
 
Old 05-28-2006, 09:00 AM   #5
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Bridge
Most folk choose to learn and work on the most recent unstable version they can get hold of.
I don't think so....
When Ubuntu or RHEL come up with an update that they recommend it is definitely NOT to give me the "most recent unstable". The update is often just a security upgrade or fixing some bug.
Especially when starting out, follow the old rule: Don't fix that which is not broken.
 
Old 05-28-2006, 06:34 PM   #6
Simon Bridge
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Quote:
When Ubuntu or RHEL come up with an update that they recommend it is definitely NOT to give me the "most recent unstable".
I agree - and I have not said otherwise. What I said was that
Quote:
Most folk choose to learn and work on the most recent unstable version they can get hold of.
... which is different. The most bleeding edge you can get hold of would naturally be unstable - this is the one that most folk will want to use to learn kernel hacking.

Of course - if you just want to tweak an existing box, then you want the source for the distro-kernel that is actually installed. This did not appear to be the situation in terms of the OP.
 
Old 05-28-2006, 09:52 PM   #7
J.W.
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There is no correspondence between the kernel version and the distro version. If you want to see what kernel you are currently running, then
Code:
uname -a
If you are interested in obtaining the very latest and greatest kernel, then go to kernel.org

Have fun
 
  


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