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Old 04-29-2006, 08:29 PM   #1
Indymaynard
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Redhat 9 DHCP problem - can't find IP information


When I first installed Redhat 9 on my machine, I had it plugged into my wireless router, and I had a beautiful connection. Since then, I put a Cisco catalyst 2950 switch in and connected my wireless router through it, and my Linux box I connected to the switch. Since then, it works fine plugging it into the wireless router, but no dice on the Linux box. It is a very simple HP setup, and I thought I had tried every trick, but I have let myself down. Does anyone have any information on this? Burn the machine? Microwave my Redhat 9 CD's? Just kidding.... But if you have any suggestions, please let me know. Thanks.
 
Old 04-29-2006, 10:03 PM   #2
Penguin of Wonder
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So your setup runs like this?

Internet --> Router --> Cisco Switch --> Linux Box

I assume you have other computers connected through the switch, do they all have internet? Are any of them running Linux too?
I honestly have no idea why this would make your internet stop working. Have you changed anything on the software side? That port isn't broke is it? Do other computers get internet through the same port on the switch?

Just out of curosity, any reason your still running RH9 and not Fedora?

(I hope I atleast came up with some fresh suggestions)
 
Old 04-29-2006, 10:18 PM   #3
Indymaynard
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Almost....

I am running Redhat mostly because I had the CD's, but also because I know it will work on my older computer (HP Pavilion circa 1998 or 1999 466 Celeron 192MB RAM 8GB hard drive, I can't even boot a CD!). I don't know anything about Fedora, so I haven't messed with it. This is my setup:

Internet to Cisco switch, Cisco feeds router and Linux box, router feeds 2 XP boxes

My router works great and the XP boxes hookup fine. My Redhat box wants to pull the address of the router still as a default gateway. I don't know how to change that other than the route add command I did. And that didn't work...So I'm kinda confused. Should I upgrade?

Last edited by Indymaynard; 04-29-2006 at 10:23 PM.
 
Old 04-29-2006, 10:34 PM   #4
Penguin of Wonder
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I don't honestly know if upgrading would help, but it definatly couldn't hurt. Since you have older hardware, you might wana consider running something besides KDE if you do. Perhaps Fluxbox with a new install of Fedora5. I know for a fact you can do a server install of Ubuntu and then use apt to get Fluxbox that way. Very clean, very effcient.

I was thinking maybe an upgrade would help since Fedora would have more advanced DHCP scripts.
 
Old 04-29-2006, 10:38 PM   #5
Indymaynard
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I'll give that a shot. Thanks very much.
 
Old 04-29-2006, 11:45 PM   #6
Penguin of Wonder
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Have you thought about using Damn Small Linux? Eveyone recmends it for older systems. Just another option. I've never personally used that one though, where I've actually used Fedora (core 3) and Ubuntu.
 
Old 05-01-2006, 06:13 PM   #7
Indymaynard
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I've considered it. I will have to look at what's included on the install. And, being a newbie, it's a little daunting to start off in a text based environment.
 
Old 05-01-2006, 07:46 PM   #8
JimBass
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If I am reading your post correctly, and you have this setup:

Code:
internet -> cisco switch -> router -> XP
                  |
                redhat
Then the problem is that the internet (if cable modem or DSL) probably is not giving out 2 addresses, but one, and the router is taking it. You need to have the linux box (OS isn't important, this is networking) behind the router. There is nothing doing DHCP until the router, save the one address that the high speed connection will do. If you switch the redhat machine and an XP box, then the redhat will be connected, and the xp in front of the router won't.

Peace,
JimBass

Last edited by JimBass; 05-01-2006 at 07:48 PM.
 
Old 05-01-2006, 08:10 PM   #9
Penguin of Wonder
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Why not put both your XP and Redhat machine where the XP machine is? Then have internet on both?
 
Old 05-02-2006, 04:39 PM   #10
Indymaynard
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I want to be able to see my linux box from the rest of the world. Now, me being only slighty educated on this crazy stuff, I understand (perhaps incorrectly) that you can't hook this linux box up behind the router and see it from anywhere else in the world. If you can, I don't know how legal it is. My whole point is that I want no restrictions to my linux box from anywhere else. How does one do this? And I checked with my ISP, and they say that 2 IP's is okay, but I have to pay $6 for a third.
 
Old 05-02-2006, 05:21 PM   #11
Nylex
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I have a limited understanding of these things myself, but you should be able to connect your Linux machine to the router and enable port forwarding on your router so it directs any traffic (correct term?) to a particular port, to a port on your Linux machine. For example, if your Internet IP address was 1.2.3.4 and you had a web server running on your machine (with internal IP 192.168.0.1), you'd be able to use your router to direct traffic from 1.2.3.4:80 to 192.168.0.1:80, so in that sense, your web server would be visible to the world. You can do this for other ports too, of course. That is legal, at least as far as I know! Hopefully this is the kind of thing you mean, if not.. oops .
 
Old 05-02-2006, 05:23 PM   #12
Penguin of Wonder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indymaynard
If you can, I don't know how legal it is.
Is there an illegal way to setup your home network??? That dosen't sound right at all.
 
Old 05-02-2006, 06:21 PM   #13
blazted
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Are you running a Web Server? If you are use port forwarding to your linux box on your router. Or whatever service you want running on the Linux box use forwarding to direct it there. You can also set this box to be visible. You just have to have it published. The only way you can have your current setup work is if you have your Linux with a Static IP address and your router with another Static IP address. Call your ISP and have them provide you with a Static IP.
 
Old 05-03-2006, 01:35 AM   #14
AwesomeMachine
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OK, let's first establish you don't want "NO" restrictions to access on your linux box. You don't want to give world writable permission to your root directory, do you? I don't think so. Otherwise anyone with internet could erase all your files. You also don't need every port open to the outside. You want 80 or 21, or both, probably. http runs on port 80. ftp runs on 21. The reason given earlier that there is nothing doing dhcp is correct. Your switch will not give out dhcp addresses. You run modem > router > switch > workstations. But, why not get rid of the switch, and just use the router. Then, configure the router to have the ports open you want. 192.168.1.1 in a browser will give you the router configuration screen. You want the port forwarding section. Forward the ports you want to be available to the internet, and away you go. But, you're insane not to run a firewall.
 
Old 05-03-2006, 08:56 AM   #15
Indymaynard
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See, I knew I should have payed attention in that Cisco class. Of course, that was 7 years ago. I didn't know I could configure my router like that. I thought that my little Linsys wireless router was kinda just for very simple basics. I didn't know you could do port forwarding and stuff on it. That's what I get for not reading. Thank you all.
 
  


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