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Old 08-30-2006, 11:48 AM   #1
krutten1986
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Quick question :)


I'm trying to read up on Linux some and I'm finding that a few of the terms are going over my head. I've been reading mostly the slackbook which is good about briefly defining advanced terms like what the kernel is, etc. However, I still feel like I'm not understanding as much as I should be. I'm a computer science major, but only took on that major this (fall) semester and am in Computer Science 1 which is a Java programming class - so I'm not sure how much help that will be. Does anyone know of a good text that starts from ground zero, I'd really like to get a good handle on Linux before I go about pulling my hair out trying to just hop in. Thanks
 
Old 08-30-2006, 12:03 PM   #2
kilgoretrout
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Get "Running Linux" from O'Reilly Press. It's the classic introductory book for linux:

http://www.amazon.com/Running-Linux-...327854?ie=UTF8


For free, the rute users guide is good:

http://rute.2038bug.com/rute.html.gz
 
Old 08-30-2006, 12:08 PM   #3
swagner7
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I would recommend that you install Linux on a machine and just get into it. You will learn more that way than by just reading about it. Of course that is my way of doing things and I recognize that not everyone learns the same way. If you have an installation of Linux and continue to read and learn about it, I think you will find that you will gain knowledge and experience faster than just by reading about it. I would also recommend Chess Griffeth's podcasts which can be found at http://www.linuxreality.com.
 
Old 08-30-2006, 12:18 PM   #4
ethics
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swagner7
I would recommend that you install Linux on a machine and just get into it. You will learn more that way than by just reading about it.
If the OP is going to be installing Slackware then i'd say reading the book before hand is a good step, and also whilst installing.

it gives valuable insights into some of the problems you face, when i had a small tipple of slackware i didn't read the book first, and so i ended up with a 2.4 kernel and some other stuff (this was like 9.1 though).

Books are a great aid, they can show you some neat tricks, and i prefer reading about something before embarking on something.

on the whole though i agree, the greatest learning experience comes from a bit of trial and error with some research and knowledge

Advise for the OP:

1) Google words you don't understand, i do that whenever i find one, it's a good thing to do for any task, and it makes things much clearer.

2) Re-read things at least twice, then break it down into manageable chunks, this will help you to remember and digest.

3) Bookmark LQ

4) Check out LQ bookmarks, and peoples signatures, all contain useful links

5) Check the publication date of any guides you follow, Linux is developing at quite a fast rate, and whilst many older techniques still apply, there are several ways to do somethigns that may not be covered (there are pros and cons to both sides of that story, i'll leave you as to which you take )
 
Old 08-30-2006, 12:32 PM   #5
kstan
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i think any book for linux is helping you, the problem is whether you can force yourself stay in linux or always go back to windows.
I start familiar linux after I force myself stop using windows. probably same with you.
 
  


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