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Old 11-24-2003, 05:39 PM   #1
CruelEssence
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Question about using 'builtin' command in Terminal?


Hi! I wanted to find all the commands on RedHat9's Terminal(Shell commands). So I wrote:

builtin

and pressed enter. But nothing happened. So I was wondering did I do anything wrong by executing that command or did I made any changes by using that command? Anyone's reply will be appreciated.

---CE
 
Old 11-24-2003, 05:46 PM   #2
trickykid
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Press tab twice and this will bring up every command in your users $PATH if you want a full list of commands on your system currently.
 
Old 11-24-2003, 05:46 PM   #3
Peacedog
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what commands are you looking for?
 
Old 11-24-2003, 05:47 PM   #4
Peacedog
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too little too late, gotta learn to type one of these days.
 
Old 11-24-2003, 05:48 PM   #5
fancypiper
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Directory of Linux Commands

# Basic piping
some_command | another_command
See Linux and the tools philosophy
# Basic re-direction:
command > textfile_name
See this Text Manipulation Article
# Basic concantenation:
If you don't want to overwrite a file but add to the bottom of an existing file, concantenate it:
command >> exisiting_text_file

Handy bash commands for finding out stuff in Linux:
# Find CPU specifications
cat /proc/cpuinfo

# Find running kernel version
uname -r

# What compiler version do I have installed
gcc -v
gcc --version

# What is the running kernel and compiler installed
cat /proc/version

# Find X server version
X -showconfig

# What pci cards are installed and what irq/port is used
cat /proc/pci

# Memory and swap information
cat /proc/meminfo
free
An article: Tips for Optimizing Linux Memory

# How are the hard drives partitioned
fdisk -l

# How much free/used drive space
df -h

# Show disk usage by current directory and all subdirectories
du | less

# What takes up so much space on your box
# Run from the directory in question and the largest chunk shows up last
find $1 -type d | xargs du -sm | sort -g

# What is the distribution
cat /etc/.product
cat /etc/.issue
cat /etc/issue
cat /etc/issue.net
sysinfo

# For finding or locating files
find
locate
which
whereis

# Use dmesg to view the kernel ring buffer (error messages)
dmesg | less

# Watch error messages as they happen (sysklog needed)
as root, tail -f /var/log/messages (shows last 10 lines, use a number in front of f for more lines)

# What processes are running
ps -A

# Find a process by name
ps -ef | grep -i <plain text>
For example, XCDroast
ps -ef xcdroast

# See current environment list, or pipe to file
env | more
env > environmentvariablelist.txt

# Show current userid and assigned groups
id

# See all command aliases for the current user
alias

# See rpms installed on current system
rpmquery --all | less
rpmquery --all > <filename>
rpmquery --all | grep -i <plaintext>

Autospec for tarballs
RPM tools

# What directory am I using
pwd

# Get ls colors in less
ls --color=always | less -R

Look at man <command> or info <command> for the flags I used and for other options you can use for bash commands.
 
Old 11-24-2003, 06:10 PM   #6
slakmagik
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If you just want to know about builtins, do 'help' and/or 'man bash' and, assuming 'less' is your pager, hit '3609g'. AFAIK, running 'builtin' with no arguments just does nothing. Not sure why it even takes nothing as an argument, rather than spitting out a 'missing option' error or something.
 
Old 11-24-2003, 06:14 PM   #7
CruelEssence
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Thanks a lot.

Actually I wanted to know a summary of all commands that are there in shell. Thanks for all ur reply.

--CE
 
  


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