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Old 06-26-2011, 05:17 AM   #1
Blackened Justice
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Problems with partitioning


Hey,I have 3 partitions on my hdd right now, a Windows 7 one, the associated System Reserved and my Linux Mint partition. I was trying to use GParted to make another partition by splitting my Linux Mint one in two smaller partitions. I can't, however, unmount it, and so can't partitions it. I have considered partitioning it from Windows 7, but I'm afraid it will screw some things up and stop booting up correctly. So, what could be making the partition unable to unmount?

Last edited by Blackened Justice; 06-26-2011 at 05:43 AM.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 05:35 AM   #2
pierre2
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rather than unmounting that drive,
use a live_cd - eg:- the mint cd - to axcess the hdd,
& use gparted from within that, to get to the drive, while it is not mounted.

however, you may find that, you need to delete the Mint partition,
in order to split it into two bits.

but with any luck, you may be able to shrink the mint partition to the left a bit,
and use that space for the new partition.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 05:51 AM   #3
0men
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4 partitions on a hard drive..... Although possible and has definately been done before. May
not be a great choice. Why do u need 4 OSs on one machine ? Maybe think about creating a persistant live USB? I realize that many people need windows for iTunes and office.

I don't think I've helped you mate but I've tried !!

peristanr live USB may be the way to go. ??
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:02 AM   #4
Blackened Justice
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I do not need 4 OSs, I need 3. One of the partitions is Windows' System Reserved 100MB partition.

I have some persistent live OS USB pens, I like them a lot, just what I'm not looking for in this particular situation.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:13 AM   #5
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If it is an option for you to reinstall Mint completely, I'd recommend to create an extended partition. An extended partition can be splitted into several logical partitions so that you are not bound to the 4 partition limit. If you don't want to reinstall Mint, you should anyway consider to create the new partition as an extended one. I have also Windows (2 partitions) and a recoverypartition, here as an example my partitiontable:
Code:
Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders, total 625142448 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x096716b2

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1            2048    31459327    15728640   27  Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sda2   *    31459328    31664127      102400    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3        31664128   138487807    53411840    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda4       138487808   625137344   243324768+   5  Extended
/dev/sda5       138487871   211897349    36704739+  83  Linux
/dev/sda6       498241958   625137344    63447693+  83  Linux
/dev/sda7       211899398   222139397     5120000   82  Linux swap
/dev/sda8       222141446   253598725    15728640   83  Linux
/dev/sda9       253600774   358458373    52428800   83  Linux
/dev/sda10      358460422   498239909    69889744   83  Linux

Partition table entries are not in disk order
don't be confused because the logical partitions are not in disk order.
You may for example create a swap partition for both (Mint and the new) Linux as logical partition.

As said above, you'll have to use gparted from a live-CD because you can only make changes at non mounted partitions.

Markus

Last edited by markush; 06-26-2011 at 07:15 AM.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:14 AM   #6
syg00
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See the (much) more useful post #2.
Use a liveCD to do the resize.

It is possible to resize without unmounting, but gparted has checks in place to not allow it (for general safely).

Be aware that if you create 4 primary partitions you will not be able to create any more. I prefer to set up an extended to hold logicals - much more flexible. Could be a problem with Mint already in place. Let's see the output from "sudo fdisk -l".

Edit: my comment was not aimed at markush' post

Last edited by syg00; 06-26-2011 at 07:16 AM.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:15 AM   #7
Blackened Justice
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How can I select this 'extended partition' option? And what is it exactly?
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:20 AM   #8
markush
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This depends on the program you use for paritioning. I use fdisk, but many people say the cfdisk is more comfortable. I'd recommend read the manpage for fdisk or cfdisk carfully before!!! using this tools and perform a backup at least of all your personal data on all your systems!

Better would be to use a virtualmachine and try it out without any risk.

Markus

Last edited by markush; 06-26-2011 at 07:21 AM.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:23 AM   #9
markush
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An additional explanation to the partitiontable in post #5: note that all the linuxpartitions including the swapspace reside as logical partitions within the extended one.

And I'd further recommend to use the
Code:
fdisk -l > fdisk.txt
command which will create a textfile named "fdisk.txt" with your partitiontable and then print it out so you can use it in a case of emergency to recover your partitiontable. The partitiontable is only a table of contents and has not directly to do with the physical data, but when the parititiontable is damaged, your systems can't finde the filesystems.

Markus

Last edited by markush; 06-26-2011 at 07:28 AM.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 07:44 AM   #10
syg00
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Note this is *not* a Linux issue, but a design mandated originally by IBM/Microsoft.
Have a read of this for example.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 08:54 AM   #11
Blackened Justice
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I think I already have an extended setup. Here is what fdisk -l prints out:

Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xa8c495a4

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 13 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2 13 53556 430085146 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 53557 60802 58195969 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 53557 60313 54267904 83 Linux
/dev/sda6 60313 60802 3927040 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Something seems wrong, why doesn't Partition 1 end on cylinder boundary (whatever that means)? And I can't run cfdisk, it gives me a FATAL ERROR: Bad primary partition 2: Partition ends in the final partial cylinder Press any key to exit cfdisk

I have all my data backed up, and I have no problem reinstalling mint.
 
Old 06-26-2011, 11:17 AM   #12
markush
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Well, this means that Mint has already created an extended partition. The Windows partition (/dev/sda2) is very big.

It seems that Linux has (including the swapspace about 60GB. Windows more than 400GB. If you don't need as much place for Windows, I'd suggest to use gparted and decrease the Windows partition down to about 250GB. Then delete the extended partition (at first the logical ones have to be deleted). Afterwards create an extended partition on the rest of the disk (about another 250GB since sda1 is very small).

The layout for the extended partition is very flexible, I change it relatively often when I install a new distribution. I give you an example for two Linux-distributions:
Code:
/dev/sda5   20GB  first distribution (the / partition)
/dev/sda6   20GB the second Linux /
/dev/sda7   Swap for both
/dev/sda8   15GB  /home for the first distribution
/dev/sda9   15GB  /home for the second one
/dev/sda10  50GB  mount this one for both distributions on the same path (I use /usr/local/public)
leave the rest free, you may once use it for example for an image of a virtual machine.
I have a similar setup, here the output of "df -h" from my laptop:
Code:
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/root        35G   16G   18G  47% /
/dev/sda8        15G  5.4G  8.7G  39% /home
/dev/sda9        50G   44G  3.4G  93% /usr/local/public
/dev/sda6        60G   40G   17G  71% /usr/local/vm
/dev/sda10       66G   11G   53G  17% /usr/local/vmwin
/dev/sda3        51G   41G   11G  80% /usr/local/win7
tmpfs           2.0G     0  2.0G   0% /dev/shm
I have yet only Slackware installed, but once used Slackware and Gentoo with the above scheme on my laptop.

Markus
 
  


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