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Old 03-11-2006, 09:17 AM   #1
The Show
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Arrow Problems with new Ubuntu Kernel, won't load


I installed Ubuntu and went to the 'updates' and it installed a new Kernel. However, when I restart/turn-off the PC it doesn't load. Only way I can get it to work is to choose the other Kernel which ends in a 9, the new one is a 10.

Any reason why Ubuntu isn't booting with the new Kernel? and is there a way to make it boot correctly?.

Thanks

Last edited by The Show; 03-11-2006 at 10:12 AM.
 
Old 03-11-2006, 09:40 AM   #2
Zeistler
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Does the kernel start to boot and then fails or doesn't it boot at all?
 
Old 03-11-2006, 09:50 AM   #3
pixellany
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First, I suggest using the Ubuntu kernel---the "Ubundu" ones have never been much good.....

I infer that, when you boot, you are getting a choice of kernels in the boot menu. You can change the default by editing the grub config file (/boot/grub/menu.lst).

If you look in /boot/grub, you will see ALL of the kernels that are available at bootup. You can disable any of these by hiding them in a folder.
 
Old 03-11-2006, 10:08 AM   #4
The Show
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeistler
Does the kernel start to boot and then fails or doesn't it boot at all?
It begins to boot then fails.

Quote:
I infer that, when you boot, you are getting a choice of kernels in the boot menu. You can change the default by editing the grub config file (/boot/grub/menu.lst).

If you look in /boot/grub, you will see ALL of the kernels that are available at bootup. You can disable any of these by hiding them in a folder.
The problem kernel has the following files:

initrd.img.2.6.12.9-3.10-386
abi-2.6.12.9-3.10-386
config-2.6.12.9-3.10-386
System.map-2.6.12.9-3.10-386
vmlinuz-2.6.12.9-3.10-386

As for hiding them, would I need to hide all of the above relating to -10? and what would I need to name the folder, and would it still need to be placed in boot?

I can't seem to edit the menu.lst file, it's read-only. How do I edit it?, I assume I log in as root, how do I do this in Ubuntu?.

I was thinking if I installed Red Hat 9 now, would I be able to choose between Ubuntu and Red Hat? as I assume Red Hat would use it's default boot loader once installed.

Thanks for the assistance so far.

Last edited by The Show; 03-11-2006 at 10:09 AM.
 
Old 03-11-2006, 10:19 AM   #5
pixellany
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If you set up dual boot, you can use the bootloader installed by either one. As long as there is boot code in the mbr of the 1st drive, and the grub config is set correctly, you can dual-boot.

to edit menu.lst, use "sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst". Or just "su" to take on root powers (see next)

Ubuntu has only one really dumb thing---disabled root account. To fix, so this: "sudo passwd root". You'll be prompted for your password and then for the new root password. For GUI login, go to System-->Administration-->Login Screen setup. Security tab--->Allow root user to log in...

Hiding the files is really just a housekeeping thing--to keep the options from appearing at bootup, you have to edit menu.lst. Hiding can be anywhere...

When the problem kernel "begins to boot and then fails" what error messages do you get?
 
Old 03-11-2006, 12:53 PM   #6
The Show
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Quote:
If you set up dual boot, you can use the bootloader installed by either one. As long as there is boot code in the mbr of the 1st drive, and the grub config is set correctly, you can dual-boot.

to edit menu.lst, use "sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst". Or just "su" to take on root powers (see next)

Ubuntu has only one really dumb thing---disabled root account. To fix, so this: "sudo passwd root". You'll be prompted for your password and then for the new root password. For GUI login, go to System-->Administration-->Login Screen setup. Security tab--->Allow root user to log in...

Hiding the files is really just a housekeeping thing--to keep the options from appearing at bootup, you have to edit menu.lst. Hiding can be anywhere...

When the problem kernel "begins to boot and then fails" what error messages do you get?
Thanks.

I managed to edit the menu.lst file, and it now boots correctly.
However, I have a problem adding some applications such as
Aegis Anti-Virus, it installs but doesn't add itself to the 'Accessories' like it says it has. Any reason why this is occuring? and how I can get Aegis to run.

As for setting up a dual boot code configuration between
Red Hat 9 and Ubuntu, how would I do this?.
 
Old 03-11-2006, 04:21 PM   #7
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Show
Thanks.
I managed to edit the menu.lst file, and it now boots correctly.
Yeah!!!--that's what we like to hear/

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Show
As for setting up a dual boot code configuration between
Red Hat 9 and Ubuntu, how would I do this?.
What is your current configuration? Just Ubuntu?
Partitions and drives? How many, size, etc.?

Easy answer: post output of fdisk -l (ell) this must be run as root (or with sudo)
 
Old 03-12-2006, 04:25 AM   #8
The Show
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Yeah!!!--that's what we like to hear/
Thanks for the help. I would still like to find out the reason why the .10 Kernel doesn't work. Also does this effect the way programs are installed, and the updates since it mentions they need the .10 kernel.

Quote:
What is your current configuration? Just Ubuntu?
Partitions and drives? How many, size, etc.?

Easy answer: post output of fdisk -l (ell) this must be run as root (or with sudo)
This is the output of fdisk:

Disk /dev/hda: 20.8 GB, 20847697920 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2534 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hda1 * 1 2489 19992861 83 Linux
/dev/hda2 2490 2534 361462+ 5 Extended
/dev/hda5 2490 2534 361431 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Just using ubuntu at the moment, tried to install Red Hat 9 again and it was very slow. Any reason why it was slow, it took around a few minutes for web pages to load.

Thanks again
 
Old 03-12-2006, 09:43 AM   #9
pixellany
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IMHO--the first thing you need to do if you are going to be dual-booting, is to get a bigger harddrive. With 2 or more OSes.... plus data, you are going to run out of space very quickly.

This aside, the steps for dual-boot are:
Create empty space on the drive--eg using fdisk to resize your main partition. You will need to do this from a LiveCD, since you can't re-size a partition whill running from it. Be sure to backup important data first.

Install OS #2, letting its installer set up a new partition in the empty space.

Allow the new install to install the bootloader--it should see Ubuntu and automatically update the grub config file.

Since you already have grub in the mbr, you can skip this step in the new install--you will then have to manually edit the grub config file (/boot/grub/menu.lst)
 
  


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