LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-29-2009, 08:59 AM   #1
crazyy
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
problem: setting advanced power management level to 0xfe


During uninstalling Dbus from my ubuntu I got this message: "setting advanced power management level to 0xfe [OK]" in a black screen and after that happened nothing so I decide to restart and when I did it I got:
kinit: No resume image, doing normal boot...

what the problem?
how can I solve it??
 
Old 07-29-2009, 10:46 AM   #2
neonsignal
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Distribution: Debian Stretch (Fluxbox WM)
Posts: 1,388
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: 355Reputation: 355Reputation: 355Reputation: 355
If this is a new install of Ubuntu (ie, if you don't have any data of value on the computer), then I'd suggest reinstalling it. You shouldn't remove dbus - it handles much of the communications between desktop applications and the operating system, so you can't do much without it.

The black screen you are seeing is just the text based interface to the operating system; Ubuntu normally hides this during startup, but because you have removed half the operating system, it can't open up any graphical user interface.

If you do have data of value on the system, then you will need to resurrect the system using the command line interface. You can do pretty much everything from the command line, so this isn't as bad as it sounds.

Just out of interest, what was the reason that you removed dbus? Perhaps the description in the package manager was a bit misleading?

Last edited by neonsignal; 07-29-2009 at 10:49 AM.
 
Old 07-29-2009, 11:02 AM   #3
crazyy
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2009
Posts: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks neonsignal

First of all the reason of uninstalling dbus is that I need to downgrade it to older version because the new version of dbus makes alot of problems with bluez. But the problem I don't know how to downgrade it so I decide to uninstall it and install the older version. If you know how could I downgrade it please help me.
Anyway I found away to solve my problem. Which is:
I tried :

Code:
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop
but I have no network configurations. So I made a new network configurations:

Code:
ifconfig eth0 my-ip netmask my-netmask up
route add default gw gateway-ip-add
sudo nano /etc/resolv.conf
and I added this line:
nameserver DNS-server-ip-add

Then I installed dbus again just because it was the reason of my problem and:

Code:
sudo apt-get install dbus
sudo dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
follow the instructions and finally reboot.
Now everything is OK.
I am replying now just in case anyone got the same problem so he can try this maybe it can help him.
 
Old 07-29-2009, 06:11 PM   #4
neonsignal
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Distribution: Debian Stretch (Fluxbox WM)
Posts: 1,388
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: 355Reputation: 355Reputation: 355Reputation: 355
Glad to see you got your system going again.

The reason why there are few instructions for 'downgrading' is that it is an inherently risky process, and likely to break the system.

It is relatively easy to create new stuff that is backward compatible with the old system, and can just be upgraded in place.

On the other hand, with downgrading, you are replacing components with older versions that might not be forward compatible with the rest of the system (because one cannot predict the future).

Anyway, yes, it is possible to force package managers such as apt to downgrade. One can use pinning to force it to install older versions of packages (have a look at the second section in this howto).

However, I would not recommend this unless you are prepared for the possibility of ending up with an unbootable system.

If you have an option of simply reinstalling the older system (not forgetting to backup your data first), it is faster and involves a lot less frustration.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advanced power management in Ubuntu clpl1980 Ubuntu 1 12-02-2007 11:22 AM
How do you shutdown Advanced Power Management in Linux jacatone Linux - Newbie 2 05-21-2007 08:19 PM
Advanced power management settings....where? BarkingBonefish Linux - Software 5 02-15-2004 12:07 AM
power management problem navarre9 Linux - Laptop and Netbook 3 12-09-2003 09:06 AM
Advanced Power Management rdanda Slackware 6 04-09-2003 08:59 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:13 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration