LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-17-2010, 10:11 AM   #1
Whatif
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Distribution: VectorLinux
Posts: 87

Rep: Reputation: 0
Primary partition


Which partitions should be set as primary, /, /home, /tmp, /var, /boot or any other?

Thanks,
Mike
 
Old 11-17-2010, 10:12 AM   #2
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181Reputation: 1181
It doesn't matter.

Linux doesn't care whether any of its partitions are primary vs. logical.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 03:11 PM   #3
Whatif
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Distribution: VectorLinux
Posts: 87

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Well, I read that the /boot partition must be on a primary partition. Was this true at any point in time?
 
Old 11-17-2010, 03:29 PM   #4
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,453
Blog Entries: 55

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatif View Post
Well, I read that the /boot partition must be on a primary partition. Was this true at any point in time?
I don't know, but it's certainly not true now. Some people like to have a separate /boot partition, others (me) don't. I've always only had / and swap, but some prefer / , /home, and swap. Others have even more.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 03:37 PM   #5
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,130
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatif View Post
Well, I read that the /boot partition must be on a primary partition. Was this true at any point in time?
There was a time when some bootloaders had problems when the /boot-partition was at a cylinder number greater than 1024, but these days are long gone.

Last edited by TobiSGD; 11-17-2010 at 03:38 PM. Reason: fixed grammar
 
Old 11-17-2010, 05:50 PM   #6
hilyard
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2010
Location: Inland PNW
Distribution: Lite | siduction
Posts: 291

Rep: Reputation: 66
Sorry, brianL, but take a look at KahelOS Manual, page 10

1. Auto-Prepare. This option will erase the ENTIRE hard drive and skips options 2 and 3 because autoprepare will already partition your hard drive (Option 2) and set mounting points for your filesystem (Option 3).
(a) Partitioning /boot. In Kahel OS, the default /boot partition is 32MB. You can enter other values then select OK to save it.

Kahel is based on another modern Linux distro.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 06:09 PM   #7
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,453
Blog Entries: 55

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Yeah, Arch (I think) recommends a separate /boot partition too in their installation manual, but a lot of distros don't bother.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 06:22 PM   #8
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,979

Rep: Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850Reputation: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Yeah, Arch (I think) recommends a separate /boot partition too in their installation manual, but a lot of distros don't bother.
Well, I'm running Arch without a separate bootpartition. It grumbles while the installationprocess but there is an option to ignore the grumble. I've never had problems without a separate bootpatition, with every distribution.

Markus
 
Old 11-17-2010, 06:41 PM   #9
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,453
Blog Entries: 55

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Like I said before, it's optional, not necessary.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 06:44 PM   #10
Tinkster
Moderator
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: in a fallen world
Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
Posts: 23,066
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by hilyard View Post
Sorry, brianL, but take a look at KahelOS Manual, page 10

1. Auto-Prepare. This option will erase the ENTIRE hard drive and skips options 2 and 3 because autoprepare will already partition your hard drive (Option 2) and set mounting points for your filesystem (Option 3).
(a) Partitioning /boot. In Kahel OS, the default /boot partition is 32MB. You can enter other values then select OK to save it.

Kahel is based on another modern Linux distro.
Ummmm ... and?



Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 11-17-2010, 06:53 PM   #11
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 14,833

Rep: Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820Reputation: 1820
/boot is optional until you delete the partition that has the boot-loader code. Then you decide it's kinda mandatory.
Lots of people seem to do it (the former) judging by threads here.

FWIW I've always allocated one at the start of a disk since the bad old days when the BIOS (note BIOS, not bootloader) had the 1024 cylinder problem. Still do.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 07:01 PM   #12
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,453
Blog Entries: 55

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Yeah, I admit it might be useful under certain circumstances, but it's not essential. Like having a separate /home partition may be useful, but not necessary.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 07:06 PM   #13
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,130
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825Reputation: 4825
Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
since the bad old days when the BIOS (note BIOS, not bootloader) had the 1024 cylinder problem.
I thought it was the bootloader, not the BIOS. Googled now after it, and we are both right, there were issues wit the BIOS and LILO back in the days, both had the 1024 cylinder problem.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 07:19 PM   #14
GazL
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Posts: 4,081
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526Reputation: 1526
I think most distros recommend a separate /boot in a primary partition because it allows for an encrypted rootfs, or rootfs on LVM or RAID setups, and is organisationally just a tidy way to do things.

If you install the grub/lilo boot-manager code on the Master Boot Record (MBR), then I don't believe you need a primary at all, but if like me you prefer to leave the MBR as it is and put the Linux bootloader on a Partition Boot Record (PBR), then you'll need one primary partition which you can mark as bootable in the partition table. The standard bootcode in the MBR will find the partition that is marked as bootable and load the Linux bootloader code from that partition's PBR. It doesn't matter which filesystem is on that partition. From an organisational standpoint / or /boot are the most sensible choices, but it could just as easily hold /home (it just doesn't make a lot of sense to do so).


I fall into the "keep the MBR standard, lilo or grub on a primary partition holding /boot, and everything else in an LVM partition" camp.


P.S. I believe that OpenBSD's bootloader still has the 1023 cylinder limitation on it's loader code, so it probably still needs to be placed on the beginning of a disk. I've no idea about where Windows needs to be.

Last edited by GazL; 11-17-2010 at 07:32 PM.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 07:24 PM   #15
frieza
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Location: harvard, il
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.4,DD-WRT micro plus ssh,lfs-6.6,Fedora 15,Fedora 16
Posts: 3,200

Rep: Reputation: 397Reputation: 397Reputation: 397Reputation: 397
if you had /boot and /lib/modules on separate partitions then you could share kernels between multiple distributions with separate / partitions, other then that /boot is only useful on older machines that have the 1024 cylinder limit
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Large-Disk-HOWTO-4.html should explain it
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
openSolaris hosed the partition table. Why? Changing primary to secondary partition? JZL240I-U Solaris / OpenSolaris 9 10-16-2008 11:48 AM
[SOLVED] Safety: Primary Partition and Extended (Logical) Partition MBA Whore Linux - Security 11 01-03-2007 03:05 PM
Partition Problems: Bad primary partition 1: logical partitions overlap rovitotv Slackware 6 01-08-2006 07:55 PM
Primary Partition cbriscoejr Fedora 1 04-12-2005 02:33 PM
Moving from extended partition to primary partition joelbudgor Linux - General 5 05-26-2004 07:08 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:01 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration