LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-13-2008, 01:00 PM   #1
spickthall
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Preference for Newbie - Ubuntu 8.04 or Mandriva or OpenSuse??


Hi All - an absolute beginner here, from Vancouver:

First off thanks for providing this forum. Have been lurking for a few days and thought I'd dive in and try to learn about Linux.

I tried to use Linux about two years ago - I think it was openSuse, and wound up screwing up a partition on my Hard Drive (lost my XP recovery sector, oh dear!). I think it was an error in setting up a bootloader. Fortunately it was a small partition (40gb) on a 200 gb HD, so I just let it go ...

Now I am interested in LINUX again, so thought I would give her another try on my new Notebook. With a 300 gig HD I would like to partition and try a couple of versions of Linux, yet reserve about 100g for Vista (I know, I know, but my wife still has to be abkle to get in and do her emails ... )

PARTITIONING:

I intended essentially 3 equal partitions: Vista, Linux 1, and Linux 2. One of the concerns I have is whether all of the partitions will be able to use each other's data files. For example - I have 3,000 songs in my ipod/itunes - mostly mp3. Will I be able to see these files with Linux if they are installed in Vista Partition? Will vista see Linux Partitions?

** Or am I best to create 4 partitions, and have one as a strictly DATA partition where I save documents that all OS's can access?

Will each version of Linux automatically create partitions when I install it?

LINUX VERSION(S):

Any advice on what will be the most accessible Linux for me to try? If I start with the most user-friendly version, then I can learn slowly. (Keep in mind I am over 50, so new training has to be beaten in over time)

I have moderate PC/Windows experience with XP&Vista. VERSIONS: I have a linuxmag Ubuntu 8.04, as well as PCLinuxOS, Mandriva, OpenSuse, probably a couple others I downloaded. (Yes - I've been collecting the disks!) I did try to use ubuntu as a LiveCD but not able to find my wireless card.


I have bought a Toshiba Satellite P300 with the following specs:

Intel Core2Duo T5750 2.0ghz
3g RAM
shared video Intel GMA X3100 (358mb assigned)
320g HD
17' Screen
Conexant CX20561 Software Sound, Intel High Definition, Harmon Kardon speaker set.
Wireless Intel 802.11 agn
DVD Burner, card reader, etc etc..

Once again, thanks very much in advance for all your help. I'm sure once I embark on this education, you will all be my tutors.

Stan Pickthall
Vancouver, canada
 
Old 08-13-2008, 01:32 PM   #2
TB0ne
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Distribution: SuSE, RedHat, Slack,CentOS
Posts: 17,961

Rep: Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693
Quote:
Originally Posted by spickthall View Post
Hi All - an absolute beginner here, from Vancouver:

First off thanks for providing this forum. Have been lurking for a few days and thought I'd dive in and try to learn about Linux.

PARTITIONING:

I intended essentially 3 equal partitions: Vista, Linux 1, and Linux 2. One of the concerns I have is whether all of the partitions will be able to use each other's data files. For example - I have 3,000 songs in my ipod/itunes - mostly mp3. Will I be able to see these files with Linux if they are installed in Vista Partition? Will vista see Linux Partitions?

** Or am I best to create 4 partitions, and have one as a strictly DATA partition where I save documents that all OS's can access?
Welcome aboard.

I don't have any experience with dual-booting (been Linux-only since 2001), but from what I understand, there are some tricks to dual-booting Vista. There are lots of threads on here that have good info on how to do it, though.

I think you're on the right track, with a "data-only" partition...I do that myself, so upgrading the OS is easy (just format the OS partition, and reload clean), but that's only a personal preference. Linux should be able to see (at least read), the Windows partition, but Windows won't be able to do anything with the Linux partition(s). There may be some tricks to enable this, but like I said, I know nothing about Windows.

My $0.02 worth would be to load one distro, and see how it fits for you, and how you like it, before trying to load another. Each one you mentioned has its own good and bad points. As a newbie, I'd suggest Ubuntu for you. It's a good distro in its own right, but is geared a bit more towards Windows familiar users.

Good luck, no matter which you choose.
 
Old 08-13-2008, 01:35 PM   #3
{BBI}Nexus{BBI}
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Nottingham, UK
Distribution: Mageia 5, Linux Lite
Posts: 4,312

Rep: Reputation: 208Reputation: 208Reputation: 208
My advice would be to learn using GNU/Linux in LiveCD mode until you are confident of what you are doing. I'm biased here so the following are listed because I have recommended these to other newbies with no complaints: PClinuxOS, MiniMe (a cut down version of PCLinuxOS) & TinyMe (A cut down version of MiniME). The main difference with the latter two is they only come with basic software, you simply add more applications as and when you need them. They all run in Live mode and have very good hardware detection (especially MiniMe & TinyMe). Stick around you'll get other recommendations soon.
 
Old 08-13-2008, 01:52 PM   #4
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,549
Blog Entries: 23

Rep: Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943
Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by spickthall View Post
Hi All - an absolute beginner here, from Vancouver:

First off thanks for providing this forum. Have been lurking for a few days and thought I'd dive in and try to learn about Linux.

I tried to use Linux about two years ago <snip>
Welcome to LQ!

We won't hold that against you. Everyone starts somewhere so why not just work with a Livecd for awhile. That way you can get around and get a feel for the OS. I would suggest that you get 'Knoppix', *buntu (Gnome or KDE) and DSL. I prefer Slackware so Slax would be another Livecd.

There are several good online references available to you;

'Rute Tutorial & Exposition', 'Linux Newbie Admin Guide' and 'Linux Command Guide' are just a few.

You should be aware of the 'Linux Documentation Project' which is a great documentation source.

These links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links' . More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 08-13-2008, 02:18 PM   #5
TB0ne
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Distribution: SuSE, RedHat, Slack,CentOS
Posts: 17,961

Rep: Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693Reputation: 3693
Quote:
Originally Posted by {BBI}Nexus{BBI} View Post
My advice would be to learn using GNU/Linux in LiveCD mode until you are confident of what you are doing.

Very good advice...that didn't occur to me, but it is a great idea for a newbie.
 
Old 08-13-2008, 03:47 PM   #6
{BBI}Nexus{BBI}
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Nottingham, UK
Distribution: Mageia 5, Linux Lite
Posts: 4,312

Rep: Reputation: 208Reputation: 208Reputation: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Very good advice...that didn't occur to me, but it is a great idea for a newbie.
It was inspired by...
Quote:
(I know, I know, but my wife still has to be abkle to get in and do her emails ... )
Hell hath no fury like a wife kept from her emails.
 
Old 08-13-2008, 04:32 PM   #7
spickthall
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks all for the advice. I will try the LiveCD approach over the next week or so, before I venture further. And check out some of the links to tutorials and etc....

All other advice is welcomed also.

I am looking at a site now from NEOSMART they have EasyBCD bootloader software that allegedly works ver well with Vista.

Comments?
 
Old 08-13-2008, 07:38 PM   #8
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,549
Blog Entries: 23

Rep: Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943Reputation: 1943
Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by spickthall View Post
Thanks all for the advice. I will try the LiveCD approach over the next week or so, before I venture further. And check out some of the links to tutorials and etc....

All other advice is welcomed also.

I am looking at a site now from NEOSMART they have EasyBCD bootloader software that allegedly works ver well with Vista.

Comments?
'Dual/Multi Booting With Vista' is a good link.

'Windows Vista Recovery Disc Download' is a good recovery cd, something M$ should have provided.

You should look at the 'How to resize a partition in Windows Vista' if you are resizing.
The "BackTrack v2.0 and MS Vista, Create Dual Boot Guide' is a good general guide that can be applied to your needs.

These links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 08-13-2008, 08:19 PM   #9
Honeysuckle
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: Australia
Distribution: Puppy, debian
Posts: 118

Rep: Reputation: 15
In addition to what's already been suggested, when you decide that you want to install something to your hard drive, I suggest that you get an imaging program (Acronis True Image is one) and image your vista partition, and your main boot record, before you do anything. When it goes awry, you can restore your partition or your boot record and you are good to go again.

Also, find out what partitions are on your computer before you install and how any recovery partition works. Mine has a hidden partition and it needs a fat32 partition for the automatic recovery thing to work - if you want to keep the recovery procedure intact you don't want to mess with either (or have an image to restore if you do want to mess with them, but go back to what you had before). You'll need to know what partitions you have, so that you can direct the installers to put things in the right place.

Having a decent backup takes a lot of the stress out of experimentation - if you know that all is not lost if you mess it up, you can be quite brave.

As for having a separate data partition, I recommend doing that. You can install different things and wipe them without touching it. Again, make sure that you've backed up all of your important data before changing anything.

As for user-friendly, I found Puppy the easiest. It doesn't have run-levels and has wizards which tell you what's going on, so it was the first I managed to "get going".
 
Old 08-13-2008, 11:44 PM   #10
Reasa
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 53

Rep: Reputation: 16
i would not recommend Rute book for a beginner
http://www.linux.org/lessons/beginner/toc.html
i started with this as soon as i installed. its outdated but all the essential linux tools/commands (so called binutils) are covered which you will meet in every distribution.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 12:36 AM   #11
fair_is_fair
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Posts: 516

Rep: Reputation: 52
Wireless and laptop. You will find configuring wireless in Mandriva the easiest out of the three.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
flashplayer opensuse/mandriva yancek Linux - Software 2 05-09-2008 08:13 PM
openSuse, Mandriva or Kubunto? kotoko Linux - Laptop and Netbook 7 03-22-2007 06:53 PM
I moved to opensuse from mandriva. kalleanka SUSE / openSUSE 3 12-15-2006 02:25 AM
Kubuntu vs openSUSE vs Mandriva BlahBlah_X Linux - Distributions 6 12-09-2006 07:27 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:18 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration