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Old 08-17-2008, 01:52 AM   #1
GLandry803
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Precompiled Executable


Hello,

I have just installed Linux (Slackware 12.1) for the first time today with good success.
I have been provided with a precompiled Linux executable for a Monte Carlo routine I would like to run. I have no idea how to execute this file. Clicking on it doesn't seem to do the trick. It was not provided as a package, so I can't get the package manager to do anything with it.

Running this Monte Carlo program was my primary motivation for trying out Linux. It can take many hours to run some problems, and I was getting tired of Windows hogging up my resources. I am expecting better performance and shorter run times with Linux.

Any help is most appreciated.

Best regards,
GL
Columbia, SC
 
Old 08-17-2008, 02:22 AM   #2
MensaWater
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What is the name of the file (or files you installed)?

Often packages are designed to be installed by a package manager like RPM on RedHat or Apt on Debian. Other times they are "bundled" tar files which are usually compressed. The file name will often indicate what type of file it is (e.g. files ending in .rpm are RPM packages, files ending in .tar.gz are gzipped [compressed] tar archives.

Also at command line if you type the command "file <filename>" it should tell you what kind of file it is.
 
Old 08-17-2008, 03:30 AM   #3
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GLandry803 View Post
I have been provided with a precompiled Linux executable for a Monte Carlo routine I would like to run.
You may well have to provide extra information; as 'Monte Carlo' can be used with a variety of simulation processes, the file you have might be anything from a simulator packaged with a set of Monte Carlo routines to a set of macros that only work with some particular program and the advice might be different in each case.

Quote:
Running this Monte Carlo program was my primary motivation for trying out Linux. It can take many hours to run some problems, and I was getting tired of Windows hogging up my resources. I am expecting better performance and shorter run times with Linux.
Monte Carlo tends to be computationally inefficient (statistically inefficient) and so any use of Monte Carlo techniques is problematic when then underlying process is time consuming. You may get improved results with Linux in some cases, but all of the computation that has to be done, still has to be done, and unless the inefficiency of your reference platform is a big factor you might find that the improvement is not as large as you had hoped. OTOH, you may find that your system usability while a big run is in progress may be improved, although you might have to do some optimisation to get there.
 
Old 08-17-2008, 09:53 AM   #4
GLandry803
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The installation file is a tgz file. The program is MCNP, and the installation instructions are simply:

3. MCNP5.tgz
-- This is a tar and zipped file with the following contents:

* directory MCNP5/Testing
regression test set for verifying correct
compilation/execution,
* directory MCNP5/bin
executables for MCNP5 and MAKXSF for Linux, MacOSX,
& Windows, and an executable for the Visual Editor
(VISED) on Windows and Linux


Short Guide to new installation of MCNP5.1.40:
-------------------------------------
0. On a Unix system, or in a Cygwin shell on a
Windows PC, un-tar the .tgz file on the UNIX CD-ROM:

tar xvfz MCNP5.tgz

This will create a directory MCNP5,
with subdirectories Testing, Manual, Documents,
bin, Sample_problems, Pstudy

PRECOMPILED EXECUTABLES ARE INCLUDED IN MCNP5/bin DIRECTORY.
To use these, add the directory to your path environmental
variable.

1. Be sure to replace MCNP5 executables if other copies
exist in other directories listed in your PATH
environmental variable, if necessary.


The executable created is called mcnp5_rsicc_1.40_linux_intel.exe.

Thanks for your help.

GL
 
Old 08-17-2008, 12:25 PM   #5
MensaWater
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Since it says it will create "MCNP5/bin" directory rather than "/MCNP5/bin" it means the directory is relative to where you installed it (e.g. your home directory so it would be "/home/<yourhome>/MCNP5/bin".

.exe is a Windows type of extension for executables. Linux and UNIX don't require specific suffixes to make files executable. They do require the file to have the execute mode bits be set with the chmod command. Since it came out of a tar it likely already has that.

Type the command "file mcnp5_rsicc_1.40_linux_intel.exe" to be sure it tells you it is an executable (typically an ELF executable). If it tells you data or something else it could be a sign it is NOT compiled for your system type.

Their statement that it would work on UNIX is a little broad. Solaris can run on SPARC RISC chips. HP-UX runs on PA-RISC chips. AIX runs on a different chip and all of these are different from Intel chips. One compiled for any one of these will NOT work on any of the others. Ideally they mean it would run on BSD or other Intel based UNIX types. Linux is a clone of UNIX. However, even if it was compiled for Intel it might not work if it uses shared libraries because each of the different kinds of OS have differences in what the way they run.

Did you in fact add the MNCP5/bin to your PATH variable? (using full path as described above rather than relative path). It may be this executable calls other executables in that directory but can't find them.

Assuming file indicated it is an executable what happens if you cd to the directory the file is in then type:
./mcnp5_rsicc_1.40_linux_intel.exe then hit enter?
 
  


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