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Old 09-15-2010, 08:28 PM   #16
TobiSGD
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As you seem to be not very familiar with Linux I would suggest to begin with the basics and read some tutorials like this http://www.linux.org/lessons/beginner/toc.html
 
Old 09-15-2010, 08:50 PM   #17
DrDwayne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
As you seem to be not very familiar with Linux I would suggest to begin with the basics and read some tutorials like this http://www.linux.org/lessons/beginner/toc.html
None of these lessons gave me any help to getting to the root. I can supposingly open a "root" terminal, it accepts my root password, but the command prompt only goes to the user.

I type in su and ignores the command while staying on the user. typing in root produces nothing.

Dwayne
 
Old 09-15-2010, 08:58 PM   #18
TITiAN
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Sorry, but you can not "go to a user". You can "go to a directory" (command: cd), and "change the user" (command: su). Confusingly, there is both a root directory (/) and a root user.

What are you trying to do in particular?
 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:10 PM   #19
TITiAN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
As you seem to be not very familiar with Linux I would suggest to begin with the basics and read some tutorials like this http://www.linux.org/lessons/beginner/toc.html
These tutorials are interesting if you have time to read them (also, they give a "book-feel", they introduce the subject, explain backgrounds, etc.). But I think there are also other ways to learn about Linux, especially if you need to learn certain concrete uses, in this case sharing files with samba.
 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:15 PM   #20
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDwayne View Post
None of these lessons gave me any help to getting to the root. I can supposingly open a "root" terminal, it accepts my root password, but the command prompt only goes to the user.

I type in su and ignores the command while staying on the user. typing in root produces nothing.

Dwayne
You have read all this lessons in 20 minutes?
It seems to me that you do not understand the differences between a user and a location in the filesystem. Even if you are root you can be in a directory in a users home. That doesn't matter. If you are root you can fire up commands that normal users can't, like installing software, and you can edit files, that normal users are not allowed to, like /etc/samba/smb.conf. You don't need to go to roots home to do this. If you have read the lessons you should know this.
 
Old 09-15-2010, 09:23 PM   #21
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TITiAN View Post
These tutorials are interesting if you have time to read them (also, they give a "book-feel", they introduce the subject, explain backgrounds, etc.). But I think there are also other ways to learn about Linux, especially if you need to learn certain concrete uses, in this case sharing files with samba.
You are right, but you need to have a basic knowledge about Linux to achieve this particular task, especially knowledge about users and editing configuration files. If the user simply lacks this knowledge, from my point of view there is no way to get it running. Therefore I recommended this tutorial. Just as in "Learn to stand, before you try to run."
 
Old 09-15-2010, 11:02 PM   #22
DrDwayne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TITiAN View Post
Sorry, but you can not "go to a user". You can "go to a directory" (command: cd), and "change the user" (command: su). Confusingly, there is both a root directory (/) and a root user.

What are you trying to do in particular?
In the redhat, I remember being able to boot to command prompt, type in root, give root password, then be able to use cd cd/ to move about the different directories. Su was also used, but needed root password.

I can't seem to do this with this Debian. I tried logining in as root during the login screen, but that didn't work.

I tried opening up a "Root Terminal" via the appliciantions->root terminal. But I cannot get to the true root of the system. I am stuck in the user directory.

About the "Manual" I have already gone through that manual before about a week ago. Nowhere does it say anything on the situation I am attempting to do. Especially when the system is up and running, Samba is there and seems to be running (verified only by using this system and going through the network administrative section and seeing the setup of the network drive, as well as this computer and other computers in the network.)

When I got Fedora 13 installed, the graphical part never worked. I was fully command prompt. I fianlly gave up on it, because of this. I have 128 meg of memory, slower and older computer, and it would lock up at times. I was able to manuever to the root directory and user directory.

I have not found the magic "window" to get to the root directory in this debian set up.

Yes, I am very VERY new to linux. I will fully admit that. I was somewhat familiar with Redhat 7.1, Ran a Web server for 3 different companies on it about 8 to 10 years ago. Apache was ran. But it I pulled it because the Server did not help the companies business. It is rather difficult to sell a commodity over the internet, when the price of the commodity changes every minute (Which I tried to tell them that in the first place <smile>)

So I continued with the Novell Network system for an inhouse infrastructure accounting system. Now, that Novell 4.1 is fairly old, and I am hoping to replace it with this Samba system.

Dwayne
 
Old 09-15-2010, 11:28 PM   #23
TobiSGD
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I don't understand what you mean with "true root". If you su and give your password, you are the true root. If you want to go to roots homefolder just type
Code:
cd /root
but why do you want to do this? If you want to configure samba, then su and type
Code:
nano /etc/samba/smb.conf
and edit the file to your needs. When you are finished with this restart samba with
Code:
/etc/init.d/samba restart

Last edited by TobiSGD; 09-15-2010 at 11:30 PM.
 
Old 09-15-2010, 11:47 PM   #24
DrDwayne
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Quote:
I don't understand what you mean with "true root". If you su and give your password, you are the true root.
Not according to the command prompt!.. the command prompt says I am in the user of "Dwayne", NOT the root! the only thing I get when I type DIR is the DESKTOP and DOWNLOADS(which I created). No other files are present.

I would like to see the user directory, and all the others. Then I know I am in the root , and can also migrate to the different directories.

Dwayne
 
Old 09-15-2010, 11:48 PM   #25
Wim Sturkenboom
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Use su - (that is su dash) instead of su The dash makes that the environment will be changed as well.

oops, missed the fact that there was a second page with replies

Last edited by Wim Sturkenboom; 09-15-2010 at 11:50 PM.
 
Old 09-16-2010, 07:15 PM   #26
DrDwayne
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I tried the su - But when I do a dir, still no files or directories.

I tried the direct command of nano /etc/samba/smb.conf and was able to access the config file.

But I cannot do a directory and see the "/etc". Using the su - and then doing a dir, I see nothing.

I am definitely loggen in as the Root administrator, because I was able to axcess the conf file, change it, and save it.

Could these dir be hidden somehow during the setup I did?

Dwayne
 
Old 09-16-2010, 07:23 PM   #27
TobiSGD
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I recommend that you actually read the tutorial I have linked in a previous post, especially about the linux filesystem and the command cd. In linux the root of the filesystem has the name / so the the command cd / will bring you to the root of the filesystem. There you will see the folder /etc. Changing the user, like from normal user to root with the command su will not change your actual position in the filesystem.
 
Old 09-16-2010, 07:58 PM   #28
DrDwayne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
I recommend that you actually read the tutorial I have linked in a previous post, especially about the linux filesystem and the command cd. In linux the root of the filesystem has the name / so the the command cd / will bring you to the root of the filesystem. There you will see the folder /etc. Changing the user, like from normal user to root with the command su will not change your actual position in the filesystem.
THAT is the problem cd / is NOT bringing me to the root directory. If it is, there are no files or directories if I do a dir command. It is totally blank.

Before, i could type in dir and see all the differnet directories I could progress into, as well as the files. This is non-existant now.
 
Old 09-16-2010, 08:12 PM   #29
TobiSGD
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If your directory / would not be existent you would not be able to start your system, because you would have no linux-installation at all. There must be a directory / that you can reach with cd /.
 
Old 09-16-2010, 08:48 PM   #30
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Ok, I did a complete reinstall with format of the drive.
I finally can get to the root directory with visual verification!

Wow! I don't know what happened, but it is there.
thank you all for being so patient with me. I feel like I have put you all through the ringer, and that is NOT my intention.

I also realize this is a older computer. I am also having video problems too. though it shows ok on the video, some of the windows I am not able to "scroll" down and see all that is in it.

Step 1 finally completed!

Dwayne
 
  


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