LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-05-2004, 02:45 PM   #1
SirCez
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
Please help me..


Hi everyone.

How do Linux and Windows organize their swap space?

Can anyone help me answer the above question. I will be really gratefull if anyone helps me. I have searched the forum but couldn't find the asnwer to the above question. Please help me. Thanks in advance.

regards
Mehmet
 
Old 05-05-2004, 02:49 PM   #2
kvedaa
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Virginia
Distribution: PacketProtector
Posts: 331

Rep: Reputation: 30
I am sorry, I do not know what you mean by organize swap space? Could you be more discriptive regarding what you want to accomplish, it will likely improve your chances of getting a satisfactory answer.
 
Old 05-05-2004, 02:56 PM   #3
SirCez
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
To be hones thats how the question was given to me. Maybe how swap space works in Linux and Windows i guess. I searched all over the web, but couldn't find anything.
 
Old 05-05-2004, 03:08 PM   #4
320mb
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: pikes peak
Distribution: Slackware, LFS
Posts: 2,577

Rep: Reputation: 48
windows swap
 
Old 05-05-2004, 03:14 PM   #5
SirCez
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Quote:
Originally posted by 320mb
windows swap
What about Linux
 
Old 05-05-2004, 04:32 PM   #6
kvedaa
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Virginia
Distribution: PacketProtector
Posts: 331

Rep: Reputation: 30
fair enough, the link above for windows swap discuss the option to allow windows to resize the swap file for windows on the fly. This brings up a noteable diffrence between how windows and linux normally handle swap space. On a windows box, it will simply create a file on the primary partition (although you can modify this behavior and create additional swap files on extra drives if you choose to do so).

In Linux, it is generally more of a fixed item. For the most part linux use partitions that are dedicated for swap space. When making the choice for how big to set up your swap space when making this partition going with twice the size of the amount of RAM that your box has (or intends to have), is not a bad starting point.

But this information is more along the lines of defining you swap space vice orginizing it. But I hope that it helps you.

Last edited by kvedaa; 05-05-2004 at 10:23 PM.
 
Old 05-05-2004, 04:38 PM   #7
SirCez
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thankyou so much kvedaa, that was really helpful.

Here is another question:

Under what circumstances programmed I/O might be used?

And this is what i wrote:

A programmed I/O can be used for game peripherals. For example, a game pad is used to send signals to the game to perform certain actions in the game, which is processed by the CPU. When the signal is sent, the instruction is executed and what happens is that most of the time, the CPU will be waiting for input signals from the game pad before executing the next instruction.

Do you think that is correct?
 
Old 05-05-2004, 05:32 PM   #8
marghorp
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Slovenia
Distribution: Slackware 10.1, SLAX to the MAX :)
Posts: 1,040

Rep: Reputation: 45
I believe so.
 
Old 05-05-2004, 05:43 PM   #9
SirCez
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2004
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I just hate these questions about operating systems.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:30 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration