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Old 01-02-2010, 03:28 AM   #1
Vanorge
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Registered: Jan 2010
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please help. 9.10 fresh install on dual boot problem.


i am a total nooooooooob to Linux. and im not a programmer. i decided to try and give Linux a try. so far I'm very, very , very frustrated :0)

k so the problem is this. i have installed Ubuntu Linux 9.10. i've tried to install updates from the update manager and for some reason i get this message:

Not enough free disk space


"The upgrade needs a total of 408M free space on disk '/'. Please free at least an additional 408M of disk space on '/'. Empty your trash and remove temporary packages of former installations using 'sudo apt-get clean'"

the disk usage analyzer says it only has 2.3 gb and 100% is used,the total filesystem usage is 2.3gb and 99.6% is used. this is a fresh install did i mess up somewhere along the process?

abit ip35 pro
Intel e8600
4 gig of dominator
ati 4870x2 graffix card

please help. i'd really like to learn this Linux OS so far it's been a pain i've looked and looked for a solution but im at my wits end. so im coming to you guys

tx

went to terminal and typed df if it helps with possible solution:


vanorge@Vanorge:~$ df
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdb5 2403420 2352612 0 100% /
udev 2028572 368 2028204 1% /dev
none 2028572 168 2028404 1% /dev/shm
none 2028572 92 2028480 1% /var/run
none 2028572 0 2028572 0% /var/lock
none 2028572 0 2028572 0% /lib/init/rw
vanorge@Vanorge:~$



P.S. i have two hard drives one is all vista/windows 7 and on the second I have Xp on the first 80gb and Linux on 70 of the last 80

Last edited by Vanorge; 01-02-2010 at 03:58 AM.
 
Old 01-02-2010, 03:43 AM   #2
jlinkels
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Hi and welcome to LQ

Most of us were frustrated when installing Linux for the first time. Later you learn not everything is hidden and dealt with automatically like in Windows, but you'll also learn that you get more information and can solve things instead of format the hard disk and re-install.

Now for this problem, open a command line window, and issue the command:
df -h
Mark the output with your mouse, select Edit -> Copy from the command line window and paste the results here.

In the future please use a more descriptive title for your thread. "Help me" makes many people not wanting to look in such a thread. After all we all need help. Much better: "Ubuntu says there is no space left on the device right after installation"

jlinkels
 
Old 01-02-2010, 03:55 AM   #3
Vanorge
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oops sorry about that. your right about the title just kinda feeling alittle beat up.lol

anyways "command line" is that the same as terminal? if so i tried df-h and i get a message: "command not found"
 
Old 01-02-2010, 04:07 AM   #4
Vanorge
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Smile

i found this code while searching for a solution. just in case you all gather something from this


vanorge@Vanorge:~$ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 160.0 GB, 160000000000 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19452 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x1ec81ec8

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 19451 156240126 7 HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sdb: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x2f1c2f1b

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 9735 78196192+ 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sdb2 9736 19131 75473370 83 Linux
/dev/sdb3 19132 19457 2618595 5 Extended
/dev/sdb5 19132 19435 2441848+ 83 Linux
/dev/sdb6 19436 19457 176683+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
vanorge@Vanorge:~$



this is what im getting with df-h

vanorge@Vanorge:~$ df-h
df-h: command not found
vanorge@Vanorge:~$

Last edited by Vanorge; 01-02-2010 at 04:11 AM.
 
Old 01-02-2010, 04:19 AM   #5
btmiller
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It's "df -h" not "df-h" (the command is "df" with "-h" as the option). You already posted the results of df in your original post and it does indeed look like your root partition (/) is full. From your fdisk it looks like you have two Linux partitions, sdb2 and sdb5, but from your df only one is being used, sdb5 which is a very small partition (only a couple of gigabytes). My guess is that you intended to install on sdb2. How did you set up the install? Did you partition the disk manually or have the installer do it for you?

The easiest thing to do, I suspect is to move either /usr or /home (whichever is taking up more space) onto sdb2, freeing space up on sdb5. Can you try the following commands as root:

mkdir /mnt/newspace
mount /dev/sdb2 /mnt/newspace

If the mount is successful, it means sdb2 has a filesystem on it and is ready to go. Please post back if that is the case and we can tell you how to move the data (this can be a bit tricky, though).

In the end, if you don't have any critical data, you might want to simply redo the installation. For home use, I suggest 4 partition, /, /home, /boot, and swap although /boot isn't really needed these days. Both / and /home should be fairly healthy (> 10 GB) for the typical home user, since most of your programs will be installed in /usr (which will be on / if no separate partition is created) and your personal files are kept in /home. The /boot partition can be a couple hundred MB and I usually set swap to 2 x RAM or 2 GB, whichever is less.

I know this must all seem horribly confusing at the outset. I remember back in with my first install (Red Hat 5.2 many, many years ago) that I was horribly confused by how disk partitioning works. It's pretty easy once you get the hang of it though, it just takes an initial time investment and the willingness to read some docs and ask questions when you don't understand stuff. Good luck!
 
Old 01-02-2010, 04:35 AM   #6
Vanorge
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tx for the reply! i booted back onto vista okay to check my disks and it seems that some how i messed up the partitions after the first install.

i did this
1. i used disk management to shrink and make a new partition on my second disk did this from vista
2. booted from dvd and installed
3. installed to sdb2 which i believe is the correct space
4. attempted a reinstall when this "no disk space" issue arose the first time ( this is where things probably got really screwy)
5. while attempting to reinstall it would only want me to install in sd1 which was a no no .. so i deleted sb2 lol through the manual partition option. and then it did let me install anyways to make a long story short. im going to delete the partitions and hopefully start all of over from one, i hope xp is not lost. because now i cant even get into ubuntu im writing this from vista. something didn't install correctly is some message im getting after i type my password. oh well

if you have anymore advise on the subject that would be cool to post just in case it happends again... be it me or some other poor soul

and yea i won't give up. somehow this pain , hurts but it's still pretty fun ... go figure

Last edited by Vanorge; 01-02-2010 at 04:40 AM.
 
Old 01-02-2010, 03:43 PM   #7
btmiller
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Registered: May 2004
Location: In the DC 'burbs
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Yeah it sounds like given what happened it's probably best just to start over. I'd suggest deleting all of the Linux partitions (leaving the Windows ones intact) and partition the disk during the Ubuntu install (I think Ubuntu's installer can do this automatically, but I tend to do it by hand myself). I'd also suggest backing up any important data on Windows. Just deleting the Linux partitions and redoing things should not hurt Windows, but mistakes/unforeseen circumstances can happen and it's better safe than sorry.
 
Old 02-16-2010, 06:43 PM   #8
theiron
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Trying to start over with Ubuntu

Quote:
Originally Posted by btmiller View Post
Yeah it sounds like given what happened it's probably best just to start over. I'd suggest deleting all of the Linux partitions (leaving the Windows ones intact) and partition the disk during the Ubuntu install (I think Ubuntu's installer can do this automatically, but I tend to do it by hand myself). I'd also suggest backing up any important data on Windows. Just deleting the Linux partitions and redoing things should not hurt Windows, but mistakes/unforeseen circumstances can happen and it's better safe than sorry.
This is exactly what I was trying to do, but could you be a bit more specific as to what needs done and how? Like, what utilities in what OS are used to perform such tasks?

I'm no stranger to CHPT from back in the day, but can I do such from a LiveCD? I've got 8 partitions on the HDD now, due to a "botched" reinstall of Ubuntu 9.10 Netbook Remix. I had a dual bootable eMachines M2352 until I shut down Ubuntu the hard, with the power switch.

Oh boy, it's good to see that things haven't changed, Unix filesystems can still get corrupted by little things like pulling a cable out. So much for 'data-integrity', huh?

I'll look around some more, maybe hit on just the thing, but why can't you "gurus" just 'splain a bit more plainly for folks that want to know? I had the same problem when I was trying to burn the ISO image onto CD-R, and nobody had any URL pointing to the godsend of all ISO burning software, InfraRecorder. How fraggin' hard is that? Or, guide using a URL to the proper thread that may just answer the question?
 
  


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